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Full text of "Report of the Corporation Commission for the biennial period .."

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/reportofcorporat1932nort 



,North Carolina State Libraiy. 
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STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 



TWENTY-SIXTH REPORT 



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CORPORATION COMMISSION 



BIENNIAL PERIOD, 1931-1932 



COMPILATION FROM RAILROAD RETURNS ARE FOR 
YEARS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1930 AND 1931 



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STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

CORPORATIOJN^ COMMISSIOlSr 



W. T. LEE, Chaieman 
GEORGE P. PELL 
STANLEY WINBORNE 

COAIMISWiOiNKRS 

R. O- Self, Clerk Rebecca Mekeitt, Reporter- 

Elsie G. Riddtok, Assistant Clerk Maey Shaw, Stenographer 

Edgar Womble, Statistician 

RATE DEPARTMENT 

W. G. Womjjle, Director of Railroad Trans imrtation 
Needham B, C0RRE1.L, Rate Specialist 
C. H. Noah, Junior Rate Specialist 

CAPITAL ISSUES DEPARTMENT 

Stanley Winborne, Commissioner 
Sophia P. Busbhp:, Stenographer 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 

Raleigh, December 5, 1932. 
His Excellency, O. Max Gardner, 

Governor of North Carolin'O., 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Sir: — As required by Section 1065, Chapter 21, Consolidated Statutes, 
the Corporation Commission has the honor to report for the biennial 
period 1931 and 1932. 

The 1931 Legislature passed Chapter 455, of the Public Laws, which 
materially amended Chapter 21, Article III, Volume I, Consolidated 
Statutes, by giving this Commission authority to require uniform ac- 
counting, annual and other reports, make ex parte investigations, require 
certificates of convenience and necessity for the transfer of public utility 
property, and to a])prove contracts between utilities and holding Com- 
panies. 

Electric Kates 

This Commission has had jurisdiction of ehn-tric, gas and telephone 
utilities since 1913, Practically all the utilities operating in the State at 
the present time were at that time operating and had many of the plants 
that are in operation today already in service at the time that the Com- 
mission obtained jurisdiction. Since that time, there has been only one 
increase in electric rates made by Commission order after hearing, — 
that of the Southern Povv'er Company in 1921 ; and, on appeal the Com- 
mission's decision in that case was upheld by the Supreme Court. The 
increase in public utility earnings has not come about by increase in 
rates, but by extension into new territory and growth in industry. Dur- 
ing and aft(>r the close of the World War the great criticism of public 
utilities was caused by their inabilit}^ to su])ply the demand, which was 
so great from sources of industry that the utilities financed themselves 
for a great growth in hydro development, ^vhich took a period of years 
to develop, and about the time that this development was completed, de- 
crease in business because of the financial depression left many of them 
with investments in ]:>lants which have capacities in excess of present 
demands. 

A¥ith reference to tlie authority given the Commission to require an- 
nual reporting, etc. the Commission revised its requirements under the 
1931 statute, and, based upon the information obtained through that 
source, made a thorough investigation of the earnings of the several util- 
ities possible. After it had compiled sufficient information, the Com- 

iii 



iv N. C. OoKi'OHATio:^ Commission 

mission issued an order on July 21, 1932^ directing the scA-eral utilities 
to appear before it for conference. To date, we have concluded confer- 
ences with the four large electric utilities in the State, w^hich have re- 
sulted in an annual reduction in rate revenue, as follows: Duke PoAver 
Company, including Southern Public Utilities Company, $957,000; Dur- 
ham Public Service Company, $65,000; Carolina Power & Light Com- 
pany, $120,000; and Tide Water Power Company, $25,000. Prior to 
these conference's, during the study and investigation in 1931 reductions 
and adjustments in vaivious g-as, electric and telephone rate schedules 
were made, Avhich resulted in approximately $200,000, w^hich when added 
to the above, make total reductions amounting to $1,367,000. 

We take the liberty to quote a comment of an examiner of the Federal 
Trade Commission on the comprehensiveness of our report forms. He 
said : 

While not among the most elaborate and extended report forms in use, it 
contains several novel schedules, designed to bring out important and useful 
information, as well as schedules to develop what is commonly recognized 
as essential in a revealing report. This examiner found the information 
therein well worth while for his purpose and he is disposed to rank the 
report form as among the very best now in use. 

The above qnotation was taken from the report of Examiner Dicker- 
mon to the Federal Trade Commission in his investigation of the Tide 
Water Power Company. 

As to certificates of convenience and necessity, the Commission wishes 
to emphasize tluit this requirement has been found to be veiy effective 
in accomplishing the purpose desired. Prior to the passage of this act, 
public utility properties could be transferrc^d or constructed without the 
knowledge of tbe Commission, and in many instances have been trans- 
ferred and operated for twelve months without the Commission's know- 
ing of the change in ownership. Since the passage of this act, the Com- 
mission has been called u])on to issue seven such certificates, and the 
practice required bv the Commission under this section is embodied in 
Rule N^o. 8, of the Commission's Rules of Practice and Procedure, and 
enables the Commission to obtain first-hand information about the pur- 
chaser of a public utility which would not be possible for it to obtain 
over a long period without invoking this act. This section of the act 
was one of the fii'st restraints that has ever been thrown around a utility 
jU'operty by an act of the Legislature of this State, and no act that has 
the effect of restraining the actions of an individual or corporation can 
escape some criticism. The operation of the act has been satisfactory 
and if any change therein is contemplated, it should be strengthened 
rather than weakened. 



Lettek of Tkansmittax. V 

We have iiad uiaiiy favorable comments on tlie authority given the 
Commission with reference to the approval of contracts between utilities 
and holding companies. This question is not only attracting the atten- 
tion of this Commission, but is receiving due consideration from other 
states in the Union as well as the Federal Government. It has become 
a national issue because of the failure of what was known as the "Insull 
Empire," an association of holding companies controlled by Samuel 
Insull, of Chicago, and his allied interests. Some of our utilities in 
this State were affected by that failure and this Commission, in taking 
action with reference to these, has been confronted by the necessity for 
cautious procedure in order not to put these in receivership also. We 
report our findings as follows : 



VI 



N. C. Corporation Commission 





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Letter of Transmittai. 



vn 



The legislation passed by the 1931 Legislature has been found to be 
wholly necessary in the conduct of the Commission's business during the 
past two years and it contemplates preparing and presenting to the 
Legislature additional suggestions for strengthening our present law, 
to meet modern requirements in public utility regulation. 

Telephone Rates 

For some time the Commission has had under consideration the ques- 
tion of telephone rates. The comparison of our rates with those of ad- 
joining states reveals the following : 



AVERAGE RATE FOR EXCHANGES OF LESS THAN l.OOD 
TELEPHONES MAGNETO SERVICE 





Number of 
Exchanges 


Rate 


State 


Business 
l-Party 


Residence 
1-Party 


North Carolina .. ..... .. 


28 
37 
70 
120 
46 


$3.35 
3.55 
3.35 
3.05 
3.50 


$2.25 


South Carolina . ... 


2.25 


Georgia 


2.00 


Tennessee 


2.00 


Virginia . 


2.35 







AVERAGE RATE FOR EXCHANGES OF LESS THAN 1,000 
TELEPHONES COMMON BATTERY SERVICE 





Number of 
Exchanges 


Rate 


state 


Business 
1-Party 


Residence 
1-Party 




17 
16 
30 
10 
10 


$3.85 
4.30 
3.90 
4.15 
3.50 


$2.45 




2.65 




2.30 


Tennessee . ... _ . 


2.40 


Virginia .. 


2.45 







Vlll 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



AVERAGE RATE FOR EXCHANGES HAVING BETWEEN 
1,000 AND 3,000 TELEPHONES 



Stiit<' 



North Carolina 
South Carolina. 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Virginia 



Number of 
Exchanees 



Ratt 



Business 
l-Party 



S4.00 
5.15 
4.90 
4.50 
4.00 



Residence 
1-Party 



$2.65 
3.15 
2.90 
2.75 
2.75 



AVERAGE RATE FOR EXCHANGES HAVING BETV^EEN 
3,000 AND 10,000 TELEPHONES 



State 



North Carolina 
South Carolina. 

Georgia-- 

Tennessee 

Virginia 



Number of 
Exchanpies 



Rate 



Business 
1-Party 



$5.50 
6.40 
6.25 
5.00 
5.00 



Residence 
1-Party 



.«.25 
3.80 
3.60 
2.50 
3.00 



COMPARISON OF EXCHANGES OF MORE THAN 10,000 TELEPHONES 



Exchange 



Asheville, N. C 

Charlotte, N. C 

Savannah, Ga 

Atlanta, Ga — 

Knoxville, Tenn — 
Chattanooga, Tenn 

Nashville, Tenn 

Memphis 

Roanoke, Va -. 

Norfolk, Va 

Richmond, Va - 



Rate 



Number of 






Telephones 


Business 


Residence 




1-Party 


1-Party 


10,154 


$5.75 


$3.35 


14,524 


6.50 


3.75 


11,530 


7.00 


4.00 


61,086 


10.00 


4.50 


16,217 


7.50 


3.50 


18,500 


7.50 


3.50 


32,722 


7.50 


3.75 


44,078 


7.50 


3.75 


16,213 


6.00 


3.50 


33,553 


8.50 


4.00 


44,408 


8.50 


4.00 



Conferences on these rates liave been set for early in January, 1933. 



JvBTTER OF TbAASMITTAL IX 

Artificial Gas EATEt< 

Investigation and study of artificial gas rates and s<3rviee has been 
practically completed and confei'ences will be held with the companies 
during the month of Decemher, with a view to making such reductions 
as may he found expedient. 

Motor Vehicle Ooaimois Cabriees 

The views of tbe Commission on this subject as expressed in its report 
to the 1931 Geneial Assembly have not changed. Your attention is re- 
spectfully dire(;ted to that report, ^o appropriation is made to the 
Commission for the performance of this work and it is believed that the 
request which has been made to the Budget Commission for this work, 
if granted, will result in much additional revenue to the State. 

Interstate Rail Rate Investigation 

An appropriation for interstate rail rate investigation work has been 
requested of the Budget Commission and is sponsored hy the Traffic 
League of the State, which is composed of the leading traffic officials of 
the several industries in this State and is to be used for investigational 
purposes only where the rate structure affects the State at large. The 
waging of rate cases for reduction in rates on particular commodities is 
usually borne by the particular industry interested and it is not con- 
templated to pay such expense from this fund. 

Public Utilities Department 

An appropriation of $30,300 for a Public Utility Investigation De- 
partment has been requested of the Budget Commission because of the 
fact that this State never has made any expenditures for the setting up 
of values of the particular utility properties through extensive appraisals, 
nor has it made general audits of the public utilities in question. The 
work which is contemplated to be done by virtue of the appropriation 
requested vnll be laying the basic foundation on which all future rates 
will be made. For illustration : If we had the appraisal and audit of a 
public utility property from its inception to the present, future rate 
cases could take that in consideration with additions and betterments 
and have a rate base on which to form any conclusion that might be- 
come necessary over a number of years to come. It is too expensive to 
try to accomplish this as a special undertaking and much better results 
may be obtained from going about the matter deliberately, \Yiili a regular 
force working upon it from month to month until it is finished. 

This Commission has under its jurisdiction fifty railway companies; 
103 telephone companies; 75 artificial gas and electrical power com- 



X ]Sr. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 

paiiies; and 134 common carrier motor vehicle operators. All of these 
Utilities have a fixed book capital in excess of $660,000,000 and had in 
excess of $100,000,000 of gross operating revenue for the year 1931. 
They paid to the State, counties and municipalities approximately 
$10,000,000 in taxes during the same year. The supervision and regula- 
tion of these companies during this same period cost the State consid- 
erably less than one-half of one per cent of the taxes paid; and, if the 
request which is being made for the next biennium appropriation is 
granted and should be spent, such regulation then would cost the State 
less than one per cent, of the taxes paid in by these utilities. 

Railroads 

General 

In our report for the previous biennial period we commented on the 
effect of motor vehicle transportation on the railroads as evidenced by 
matters coming before the Commission. During the period covered by 
this report, the rail carriers have continued to feel, even more keenly, 
the effects of the competition of other forms of transportation due to 
the general business depression. This has been evidenced by numerous 
applications to discontinue agency stations, by requests for permission 
to establish reduced rates to meet motor truck competition, and by the 
abandonment of short line railroads. 

The Commission has continued the policy of extending liberal treat- 
ment to short line railroads in the matter of rates, however, notwith- 
standing this policy the carriers listed below have received from Federal 
authorities permission to discontinue operation and have abandoned their 
lines of railroads. 

Carolina Railroad Co. Operated between Kinston and Snow Hill, N. C. — 
15 miles. 

Dover and South Bound R.R. Operated between Dover and Richlands, 
N. C— 25 miles. 

Elkin & Alleghany R.R. Operated between Elkin and Doughton, N. C. — 
12 miles. 

Atlantic Coast Line R.R.* Branch between Smithiield and Goldsboro, 
N. C— 22 miles. 

The discontinuance of these lines has made relatively little change 
in the total railroad mileage operated in N'orth Carolina. The figures 
are 4,968.14 miles for 1930 and 4,887.63 miles for 1931. The carriers 
operating this mileage reported a total investment in road and equip- 
ment of $308,725,032.67 in 1930 and $307,506,142.99 for 1931. For the 
year 1930 the same carriers reported a total capital stock of $114,984,- 
350.56 and a funded debt of $151,121,798.54 with corresponding figures 
for 1931 of $114,253,532.87 and $153,550,410.38. 

* Trunh Line. 



Lettek of Teansmittai. xi 

The operating revenue in 1930 was $67,121,149.30 which was a de- 
crease of $11,628,504.72 from the figure of $78,749,654.02 for 1929. 
This fig-ure was further reduced for the year 1931 to $57,039,716.67. Of 
the operating revenue for 1930 $10,426,110.57 was from passenger train 
service while for 1931 this figure was $7,896,489.63. For comparative 
purposes, it should be pointed out that the corresponding figure for 1929 
was $13,331,261.91. 

The above figures indicate to some extent how the carriers in North 
Carolina have suffered and are still suffering from the general business 
depression in common witli the conditions in the nation and all other 
States in the Union. 

As a result of the conditions described, a case, sponsored by bond 
holders and other financial interests, was brought by the carriers before 
the Interstate Commerce Commission seeking authority to increase all 
freight rates 15 per cent. Our Commission, along with other State Com- 
missions and shipping interests, opposed the carriers application at 
public hearings and contended that increased freight rates would have 
the effect of diverting more traffic to other forms of transportation and 
would, therefore, be detrimental to the rail carriers, to say nothing of 
the great handicap such increases would place upon business at a time 
when it could be ill afforded. 

The Interstate Commerce Commission took our view of the matter 
but in dismissing the application that Commission found that there 
were certain moving commodities upon which it was thought some ad- 
ditional charges might reasonably be collected for the benefit of the weak 
rail lines, which money is to be loaned to such carriers. Our Commis- 
sion upon petition from the carriers approved the same increases on 
intrastate traffic as authorized on interstate traffic with limited excep- 
tions, as did practically all other State Commissions. 

The railroads have and are endeavoring to meet the competition of 
motor transportation, both freight and passenger. Rates on various 
commodities have been reduced by the carriers with notations in the 
tariff's to the effect that such rates are published to meet motor truck 
competition. 

In the passenger field, the efforts of the carriers to increase their 
revenues have been directed to low week-end excursion fares and to cer- 
tain experiments with reduced fares over certain portions of the lines 
of individual carriers. 

Cases Before the Interstate; Commerce Commission 

North Carolina Rate Case, I. C. C. Docket 21665: The record in 
this case, which was referred to in our previous report, has been closed 



xii N. C. Corporation Commissiots 

and the case submitted to an examiner of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
sion. The briefs were filed on June 10, 1932 and it is hoped that a 
favorable proposed report will be received in the very near future. 

Caroliim Coal Cases, I. C. C. Docket No. 2331J{ : This case attack- 
ing the rates on coal to all points in jN^orth Carolina from all mine 
producing points which ship into the State has been submitted to an 
examiner of the Interstate Commerce Commission since November 10, 
1931. The case became involved with an investigation and suspension 
case, next referred to, which has delayed final disposition. A report 
in the case is expected any time. 

Coal to the Southeast, I. & S. Doclxet 377 S: This case resulted from 
an endeavor of the carriers to increase rates on coal to the southeast 
generally, including the southeastern part of J^orth Carolina. This 
Commission, along with other parties, succeeded in having the increased 
rates suspended and thereafter participated in the proceeding in order 
to protect our interest in complaint cases hereinbefore referred to. 

Cotton and Knitting Factory Products, Dockets :2Jil39 and 2Jf-lJ^0: 
These two complaints have been filed in the name of the Commission 
seeking to secure for N'ortli Carolina manufacturers of cotton goods a 
more equitable basis of rates. Due to financial conditions, the burden 
of prosecuting the cases was thrown on the cotton goods people. The 
cases have now been submitted to an examiner of the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission and a proposed report is expected during the first 
half of the coming year. Combined with these two cases is an investi- 
gation and suspension proceeding (I. k S. Docket 3636) resulting from 
an attempt by the carriers to increase cotton goods rates. 

Leaf Tobacco Rates. I. & S. Docket 367 -k: This case resulted from 
the carriers filing tariffs carrying certain increased rates on leaf tobacco. 
The rates were suspended upon petition of various parties, • including 
this Commission, and the issues have been fj-ied and submitted to the 
Interstatfi Commerce Commission. 

Rates on Potatoes from Eastern N art h Carolina, Docket 25JfJf I : This 
case is based on complaint of the Carolina Shippers Association of Wil- 
son, ^. C. and involved the rates on potatoes from N'orth Carolina 
producing territory to ])oints in the territory north of the Ohio River 
and west of Buftalo, J^J". Y. and Pittsburgh, Pa. This Commission, upon 
request of complainants, intervened in the proceeding and supported 
the position of the complainant. Briefs were filed on l^ovember 28, 
1932. It is hoped the matter will be determined before the next ship- 
ping season. 

Consolidated Southwestern Cases, Docket No. 13535: These cases 
involved rates to nm] from that large territory west of the Mississippi 



Letter of 'rKANsMiTTAi. xiii 

River and south of the Missouri and Kansas Stat(3 lines. The; partici- 
pation of the Commission in this proceeding since our last report has 
been limited to the filing of exceptions to examiners' proposed report 
and presenting oral argument. Our efforts combined with those of other 
southern interests should result in an equitable basis of rates to and 
from Southwestern territory conipara])le with rates from competitive 
territory north of us. 

Participation Limited Due to Cukt ailed Expenditures 

Due to lack of funds as a result of insufficient appropriations and 
of curtailment in our appropriations W the budget bureau, our partici- 
pation in legal proceedings as affecting interstate rates has been limited 
to such activities as we were able to perform with the means at our 
command. 

In addition to the cases heretofore cited, we give below reference to 
other cases in which the Commission was confined to limited action. 

I. & S. Docket No. 3048— Rates on Hay and Straw. 

I. & S. Docket No. 3299 — Rates on Stoves and Ranges. 

I. & S. Dockets Nos. 3578 and 3706— Rules for Loading Watermelons. 

I. & S. Docket No. 3614— Rates on Building Materials. 

I. & S. Docket No. 3705 — Rates on Fresh Vegetables to, from and between 
points in the South. 

I. C. 0. Docket No. 12964— Consolidation of Railroads. 

I. C. C. Docket No. 17000, part 2— Western Trunk Line Territory, Class 
Rates.. 

I. C. C. Docket No. 17517 — Rates on Sand, Gravel and Crushed Stone, 
within southern territory. 

I. C. C. Docket No. 21623 — Intrastate Rates on Excelsior on complaint 
of interstate shipper. 

I. C. C. Docket No. 22771 — Rates on Limestone. 

I. C. C. Docket No. 24820 — Intrastate Rates on Limestone and Marl as 
well as interstate Limestone Rates. 

Acknowledgment of Cooperative Assistance 
The Commission wishes to express its appreciation of the fine co- 
operation it has received from tlie industrial and independent traffic 
men of the State. 

Respectfully subn)itted, 

W. T. Lee^ Chairman, 
Geo. p. Pell, 
Stanley Winborne, 

Commissioiiers. 
Attest: 
R. O. Self, Clerk. 
W. G. WoMBLE, Director R. R. Transportation. 



BIENNIAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Capital Issues Department North Carolina 
Corporation Commission 

For the Fiscal Years April 1, 1930 to Marcli 31, 1931; April 1, 1931 

to March 31, 1932 ; April 1, 1932 to December 1, 1932. 

Chapter 149 of the Public Laws, 1927, known as the Capital Issues 
Law, or the State Securities Act, provides for a fiscal period from April 
1st to March 31st. This report covers the period from March 31, 1930 
to December 1, 1932. 

It will be observed from the attached financial statement that there 
has been some decrease in the receipts of this Department during the 
period covered, but it will also be obsen^ed that the expense of adminis- 
tering the law has been materially decreased and that the receipts are 
greater in proportion to the expenditures for the period from July 1st, 
1931 up to December 1st, 1932 than ever before. The fact that this 
Department has produced revenue for the State is incidental, for the 
reason that in administering the law it has been the purpose of the 
Commissioner to protect the public against fraudulent securities and 
not to raise revenue. 

It is generally believed that I^orth Carolina has one of the most 
effective Securities Act of any of the forty-six States which attempt 
to regulate the sale of securities and it has been stated that ^orth 
Carolina is one of the most difficult States in which to qualify securities. 

Since the last Legislature, the activities of this Department have been 
hampered, due to the fact that the Legislature eliminated the Director 
nnd all appropriations for attorney's and auditor's fees, for which had 
formerly been appropriated the sum of $5,400, and provided the De- 
partment with only a secretary at a reduced salary of only $1320; and 
the Commissioner is now attempting to perform, in addition to the 
work of the Corporation Commission which has grown increasingly 
heavy, the duties formerly performed by the Director and attorney. 

While it is not recommended that said former appropriations be 
restored at this time, yet, if the Department is to continue to properly 
function and the public be protected, there should be appropriated a 
sum sufficient to employ, from time to time, additional help to make 
special investigations, examinations and audits, and to assist the Com- 
missioner at certain rush seasons of the year, when it is practically im- 
possible for the Commissioner to execute the duties of the office with 
the celerity which conditions demand. The Budget Gommisaion has 

xiv 



Capital Issues xv 

been asked for an allowance of $500 for this purpose and it should be 
borne in mind that, in the opinion of the Commissioner, the proper 
expenditure of such a sum will result in a much larger increase in 
revenue. 

Contrary to current opinion, the work of the Department has not 
decreased on account of the depression. Periods of depression such as 
this through which we are now passing, stimulate crooks in devising 
schemes to defraud the public and multiply the activities of stock 
swindlers and thereby increase the work of the Department. Schemes 
and rackets range from selling stock in rabbit farms to interests in 
oil leases and constant vigilance is required to prevent the investment 
of large sums in these gold brick enterprises. 

Furthermore, in addition to passing upon the many applications for 
qualifications of securities made to this Department, the hundreds of 
applications for dealers' and salesmen's licenses, the Department is 
required to answer thousands of inquiries in regard to various secur- 
ities which are offered for sale in the State. During the period cov- 
ered there has been over 9,000 letters written and as the work of the 
Department becomes known to the public, the inquiries for various in- 
formation annually increase. The department feels that it has ren- 
dered a considerable service to the citizens of the State and has saved 
them millions of dollars and in some instances has actually recovered 
money which has been unwisely invested in securities which were not 
authorized for sale. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Stanley Winborne, 

Commissioner. 



xvi N. C. Corporation Commissio 



N 



CAPITAI. ISSUES DEPARTMENT 

ExPKXDi'rr.'KEM IIbceipts 

April 1, 1930-April 1, 1931. 
Salaries; 

Director—. $4,500 

Attorney (3 mos.) _-. 600 

Auditor (IMt mos.) 300 

Sr. Steno-Clerk 1,800 

Total Salaries $7,200 

Travel Expense. 199 

Subscirption and Dues 100 

Total - $7,499 $18,879 

April 1, 1931-April 1, 1932. 
Salaries: 

Director (3 mos.) $1,125 

Sr. Steno-Clerk 1,640 

Total Salaries S2,765 

Travel Expense... . 54 

Subscription and Dues 100 

Total - - $2,919 $9,977 

April 1, 1932- Dec. 1, 1932. 
Salaries: 
Sr. Steno-Clerk-. S 880 

Total ---- --- - $ 880 ?4,807 

Salary of Commissioner not included, neither does this include postage, telephone, printing, etc. 
These items are included in the administrative account of the Corporation Commission. 



Utilities Decisions xvii 

(This or'Ser should have come under Electric Light Companies — page 85) 

IN RE: CONFERENCES ON PUBLIC UTILITY RATES AND SERVICE, 

Ordek 

The Commission has completed its survey of public utilities under its 
jurisdiction, which was made with a view to adjustment of rates in response 
to the demands of this unprecedented period of depression. It has made 
this survey cognizant of the inability of the public to pay almost any rate 
and also that the law requires the Commission to fix such rates as will yield 
to the utilities a fair return on the capital invested in the property which 
they devote to the public use. It has undertaken this Investigation with the 
expectancy of saving to our State the enormous amounts appropriated by 
the legislatures of other states to special commissions to investigate utilities, 
which investigations have in numerous instances proven absolutely futile 
and become obsolete before being completed, owing to the rapid changes in 
conditions. In one state the legislature appropriated fifty thousand dollars 
two years ago for such purpose; and, after the special commission had 
made its report, recommending reduced valuations upon which to base rates, 
the special commission publicly admitted it had no evidence on which to 
support its findings, the result being that not a single rate in that state 
has been reduced based upon such findings and now the legislature of that 
state has appropriated thirty-six thousand dollars more to be placed in the 
hands of its regular Railroad Commission (a body similar to the North 
Carolina Corporation Commission) to complete the investigation undertaken 
by the special commission for which it was especially created. 

In making this order this Commission can only hold out to the public 
the assurance that it shall not be required to pay greater rates than justified 
under the decisions which the courts have prescribed for its guidance in 
rate-making. It should be remembered that the utilities have been suffer- 
ing under the depression as well as the people. For instance: Many of the 
mills, factories and machine shops of the State which have in the past 
consumed much power have either shut down or are running only part time. 
The telephone companies have lost thousands of subscribers, the Southern 
Bell reporting that it has lost 59,687 subscribers in the last six months, 
4,439 of which were in the State of North Carolina. The light and power 
companies have lost in proportion, one company stating it has sustained a 
loss of 2,869 customers within the same period. 

The public should remember that when individuals and corporations were 
making fabulous profits during the period of the War and as late as 1929, 
the public utilities were limited to their same fair return on the invested 
capital; we were not permitted by law to give them rates that would pro- 
duce any more. The growth in public utility revenue in this State after the 
World War resulted from growth in business by expansion into new 
territory and building up industry and not from increase in rates. 

Public utilities, under the law, are entitled to charge just and reasonable 
rates for service which they render to the public. Under our regulatory law 
and rules made thereunder, the method by which these just and reasonable 
rates shall be ascertained is prescribed. The Commission believes that ad- 



xviii 'N, C. Corporation Commission 

justments, commensurate with a fair return upon a fair value of the used 
and useful property devoted to the public service, should he made in rate 
schedules from time to time. Rate controversies are expensive and are 
usually subjected to great delays. It is desirable that adjustments be ac- 
complished without delay or expensive procedure, and it is thought that this 
can be accomplished best by negotiation and the readjustment of rate sched- 
ules where possible. The Commission is aware that the present unusual 
economic conditions have created new problems requiring careful consider- 
ation by the utilities of all the elements affecting their rates and the Com- 
mission desires, and it is determined, that the lowest rate which will yield 
a fair return shall be promptly put into effect; therefore, pending consider- 
ation of further orders, it is now 

Ordered, That all electric, gas and telephone utilities operating properties 
in the State of North Carolina shall cause their accredited representatives 
to meet with this Commission, on dates to be named, for the purpose of 
conferring with a view to effecting such immediate reductions in rates as 
may be legitimately possible under present conditions ; and, it is 

Further, ordeired, That the schedule of dates for conferences be deter- 
mined and furnished, together with a copy of this order, to each public 
utility operating within this State; and, it is 

Further ordered, That this order be effective as of date of issue. 

By order of the Commission: 

R. O. SEI.F, 

Clerk. 
This 21st day of July, 1932. 



(This order should have come under Electric Light Companies — page 85) 

IN RE: SECTION 1037(f), CONSOLIDATED STATUTES, AS ENACTED 

BY CHAPTER 455, PUBLIC LAWS OF 1931. 

(Holding Company Relationship) 

Order 

Under authority of Section 1037(f), Consolidated Statutes, as enacted by 
may be legitimately possible under present conditions; and, it is 

Ordered, That all public service corporations operating electric, artificial 
gas, telegraph or telephone properties within the State of North Carolina 
are hereby directed to file with the North Carolina Corporation Commission, 
at its office in Raleigh, under oath, on or before September 30, 1931, the 
following: 



Utilities Decisions xix 

I 

Copies of all written contracts and statements in full of all agreements, 
arrangements, understandings and practices in effect during the calendar 
year 1930, or any portion thereof, between the reporting public service cor- 
poration and any person, firm, or^corporation, classed as a holding, manag- 
ing or operating company and engaged in the selling of services of any kind. 
Such contracts and statements shall comprise those relating to operating, 
constructing, engineering, financing, purchasing or other services and shall 
include those with parent and subsidiary companies and companies affiliated 
through stock ownership, or otherwise. 

II 

Copies of all such contracts and statements as specified in I above that 
were effective during the period from January 1 to June 30, 1931, or any 
portion thereof. 

Ill 

Statement of all fees, commissions and/or other compensation paid, or 
payable, by the reporting public service corporation in connection with its 
North Carolina operations to any such holding, managing, operating, con- 
structing, engineering, financing and/or purchasing company or agency (in- 
cluding subsidiary and/or affiliated companies) for services and/or property 
for the calendar year 1930 and also for the period from January 1 to June 
30, 1931, with statements of the character of service for which such fees, 
commissions and/or other compensations were charged and the basis on 
which determined. In cases where fees or commissions are not paid as 
such, but are paid by way of compensation as a percentage added to cost, 
or otherwise, then state in full the arrangement, agreement, understanding 
and practice in each such case. 

By order of the Commission: 

R. O. Self, 
Clerk. 

This 15th day of August, 1931. 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENTS OF COMPLAINTS 
Railroad Companies 

APPLICATION OF ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY COMPANY FOR 
PERMISSION TO DISCONTINUE ITS ENTIRE PASSENGER TRAIN 
SERVICE, MAKING IT A LINE STRICTLY FOR HANDLING FREIGHT. 

Order 

This application is dated May 23, 1931. The Atlantic and Yadkin Railway 
Company operates on its main line one passenger train daily in each direc- 
tion hetween Sanford and Mount Airy, North Carolina, a distance of 130.1 miles, 
and in addition provides passeiT^er accommodations on so-called mixed trains 
on its 'branches between Ramseur, on the one hand, and Madison, N, C, on 
the other, the Ramseur Branch being 18.8 miles, and the Madison Branch 11.4 
miles in length, the total mileage of the entire line and its branches being 
160.3 miles. The main line is mostly paralleled by hard surfaced highways 
upon which trucks and buses are operated. The application is accompanied 
by financial statement of revenue and expenses from operation of passenger 
train service for twelve months, from January to December, 1930, inclusive, 
which will later be shown more in detail; which statement shows net deficit 
from operation of the two main line passenger trains Nos. 30 and 31, for the 
year of $22,652.00, no account being taken of any charge for upkeep, or main- 
tenance of track, buildings or bridges, taxes, interest on indebtedness and 
insurance, but only the actual operating deficit based on actual out-of-pocket 
cost of the two trains. 

There is no train mail service between Ramseur and Madison, and the 
passenger business on that run is practically nothing. The application states 
it is proposed the mail will in future be handled by star routes and express 
on local freight trains, one of which is operated in each direction daily, by 
the addition of an express car and express messenger. 

Hearing was held at Raleigh, June 23, 1931, there being present, as protest- 
ants, representatives from Mount Airy (population 6,045), Pilot Mountain 
(population 1,010), Liberty (population 873), Staley, Siler City (population 
1,730), Bear Creek, Goldston (population 312), and Sanford (population 
4,253), all of which tov/ns, except Sanford, have no other railroad facilities. 
The Commission also received written petitions from points along the line 
protesting removal of these trains. The Commission likewise received numer- 
ous requests and letters from business men seeking to have the petition 
granted upon the general grounds this would tend to insure continuance of 
operation of the line for freight service. 

In dismissing the petition, from the bench, the Commission took occasion 
to suggest to protestants that the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Company could 
not be expected to continue for an indefinite period operating passenger service 
at such a loss as sho^wn and that the people along its lines might look for 
abandonment of the passenger service unless it w^as patronized; and to the 
applicant, the suggestion v/as made that the question of performing this service 



2 N. C. OoEPORATioN Commission 

in a more economical way should be considered, and that in case it was found 
no improvement in income and expenses for the service occurred, applicant 
might come back to the commission after the first of the year when the appli- 
cation would receive further consideration, in the meantime monthly finan- 
cial statements of operation were to be furnished the Commission for its in- 
formation. 

Accordingly, on January 8, 1932, the former application was renewed with 
the general statement that the trains were not being patronized either as a 
means of transportation for passengers or express, the latter having fallen 
off more than 50 per cent, that the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway has a deficit 
for eleven months of 1931, in excess of $131,000; that unless some relief is 
obtained the company faces receivership within the near future. 

Hearing upon the renewed application was had at Raleigh on Tuesday, 
February 9, 1932. The protestants present being vigorous and probably more 
numerous than at the previous hearing, and in addition the Greensboro Cham- 
ber of Commerce was represented to say that no protest was made by that 
city. A statement of revenue and expenses of the operation of these trains is 
shown below as a whole for the year, 1930, and by month for 1931. 

The figures above show month by month the relative income importance 
of the three service features sought to be abandoned, some features of the 
expense, and the total actual expense of the whole passenger operation. The 
statement also demonstrates beyond question that the total expense of the 
whole passenger service is far out of proportion to income, cost alone con- 
sidered, and yet it appears these items of income cannot be termed so unim- 
portant as should be voluntarily abandoned forever to other transportation 
agencies on account of cost alone. Particularly is this true when thought of 
in the light of these depressed times, and in connection with the gross revenue 
of a railroad with no greater mileage, or traffic density per mile than that 
of the Atlantic and Yadkin line. 

It was not contended by any protestant that improvement had occurred 
in the revenues from the movement of passengers, mail or express, but that 
the business people located upon the line are entitled to have express and 
mail service as well as freight service, and that the reason for continued) 
falling off of passenger and express revenues was due to the poor schedules 
and no efforts to improve or strengthen the service on the part of the man- 
agement. 

Upon questions by the Chairman of the Commission to the Management 
of the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Company as to what efforts had been made 
looking to the use of more economical equipment in the form of gasoline cars, 
in reply it was stated the management had looked into the matter, but had 
no money to make any change and indicated clearly in its opinion the passen- 
ger train business was a thing of the past for its line. Conditions in the 
instant case are, no doubt, like many of its kind in the United States, which 
is ably covered in general by a public address, recently delivered by an execu- 
tive vice-president of one of the small railway systems, in which the following 
language occurs: 

Our passenger service is much too fine, too heavy, and too inflexible for 
cash customers. Despite the fact that our passenger miles are 49 per cent 
of those of 1920, our passenger train miles are 87 per cent. We are faced 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 



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4 'N. C. Corporation Commission 

with the problem of either getting into the passenger business profitably 
or getting out of it altogether. For many the latter alternative may prove 
the wiser. The present cost of handling cars is about forty times the cost 
of hauling the passengers therein. The most modern motor coaches re- 
duce the ratio to five pounds of car (including the power plant) to one 
pound of passenger. The airplane reduces the ratio still lower. Not only 
is a reduction in the size and weight of our passenger trains indicated, 
but economical and profitable service requires further coordination. The^ 
passenger service, like the freight service, must be adjusted to meet the 
demands and the tastes of the average rider. . . . 

Terminal expenses not only delay our service but drain away 40 per cent 
of our revenue. Here is a fertile field for the railway technician. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds there is no uestion but 
that the applicant needs some relief, which however it is thought the manage- 
ment of the property can supply, in the form of less expensive equipment 
and operation. It is also convinced that the commercial and agricultural in- 
terests along the line of this railroad are entitled to some consideration at 
least as affecting mail and express service, and it, therefore, feels it would 
be unreasonable to allow the entire discontinuance of these services without 
further efforts on the part of the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway to "carry on" 
as a complete common carrier for passenger, mail and express service as well 
as a freight line. Moreover, the Commission still has faith in the territory 
served by this line, which line of railroad is helieved to be a stragetical one 
for the State's commercial welfare, particularly when the common carriers by 
rail in the Nation are finally consolidated into a limited number of systems. 

It is Therefoke Oedeeed, That the application of the Atlantic and Yadkin 
Railway Company to discontinue its entire passenger train service upon its 
line be, and the same is hereby denied and the petition dismissed; 

It is Further Ordered, That if the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Com- 
pany shall place in operation upon its main line between Sanford and Mount 
Airy double daily service for passengers, mail and express, using less expen- 
sive equipment and at less cost of operation in the form of gasoline cars, which 
the Commission is convinced can be provided within a period of thirty to sixty 
days at the outside, then that Company shall be deemed to be giving adequate 
passenger, mail and express service in place of steam train passenger service 
as now in operation, and the latter may then be discontinued. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 17th day of February, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7059. 

Order 

It appearing to this Commission that circumstances have arisen which 
require a reconsideration of the petition in the above entitled cause, it is 

Ordered, That a rehearing in the above entitled cause be had at 10 o'clock 
on Tuesday, June 21, 1932. 

By Order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 10th day of June, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7059. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 5 

IN RE: REMOVAL OP PASSENGER SERVICE FROM THE ATLANTIC 
AND YADKIN RAILROAD: 

Order 

By the Commission: The petition in the above entitled cause came up 
before us on rehearing on June 21st, 1932. Some new evidence was intro- 
duced. After a careful consideration of this evidence and all the evidence 
introduced at the original hearing, the Commission finds the following facts: 

1. That the convenience and necessity of the traveling public does not 
require the running of passenger trains on the railroad of petitioner. 

2. That the petitioner is losing very nearly $25,000 a year in the opera- 
tion of its passenger trains and that this loss does not include taxes, main- 
tenance or any other expense except that incurred in the actual operation of 
the trains. 

3. That the petitioner is losing heavily each year in the operation of its 
roads both for freight and passenger business. 

These facts on their face demand that we give petitioner the relief de- 
manded in the petition, but, according to our construction of the law, we 
are unable to do so. It appears to be elementary that no railroad corporation 
can divest itself of the exercise of its functions granted to it by its charter 
nor put itself in such position that it cannot exercise them. Again Section 
3481 of the Consolidated Statutes provides that a railroad company "shall 
run at last one passenger train in each direction over its road on every 
day except Sunday." It appears to us that it is the clear intention of the 
Legislature to compel railroads to give passenger service at least once a 
day to each station on its line. The Commission will venture the opinion 
that the running of a mixed train will be a compliance with the law. 

In view of the two legal propositions above we feel compelled to deny the 
petition. It is, therefore, 

Ordered, That the petition be dismissed. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This July 25, 1932. GlerU. 

Docket No. 7059. 

IN RE: PETITION OF ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY COMPANY 
TO DISCONTINUE PASSENGER SERVICE. 

Order Overruling Exceptions of Respondent 

This petition was heard by the Commission on June 23, 1932, and order 
was issued, finding certain facts in favor of the petitioner but denying the 
petition on certain legal grounds specified in said order of July 25, 1932. 

Now come the Sanford Merchants' Association, and other respondents, 
and file exceptions to certain findings of the Commission in this order, 
which exceptions the Commission has carefully considered; and, it is, 
hereby, 

Ordered, That the said exceptions are overruled. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 10th day of August, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7059. 



6 N. C. Corporation Commission 

ATLANTIC MARBLE AND TILE COMPANY, v. CAROLINA AND NORTH- 
WESTERN RAILROAD COMPANY AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COM- 
PANY. 

Order 

This is a claim in which the Atlantic Marble & Tile Company complain 
of excessive minimum weight charged on car containing 104 bags crushed 
marble, covered by Carolina and Northwestern Railroad bill of lading, dated 
Lenoir, N. C, June 1, 1929, shipment being made in S. A. L. — 79468 by 
complainant, consigned to complainant at Charlotte, and the lading shows 
shipment tendered as a carload, although the actual weight was only 10,400 
lbs. The Southern Railway, Charlotte, N. C, paid freight bill No. 361-J, 
dated June 15, 1929, shows weight charged for was 72,000 lbs., which was 
90 per cent of marked capacity of car used, and this was clearly in accord- 
ance with tariff (Agent Cottrell's I. C. C. 710). 

The facts appear to be as follows: shippers dispatched a colored man, 
with a drayload of this stone to the railroad station at Lenoir. The dray- 
man asked for a car in which to load the stone, indicating there would be 
a small lot, and the railroad representative inquired why not let the lot 
go as a less carload shipment. The reply was that shipper did not desire 
to mark the bags. There is conflicting evidence as to whether something 
was said about a "small" car in which to load, but in any event as to this 
the carrier's agent admits he was on notice the shipment was small; that 
he used the only available car on the yard which was an 80,000 lb. capacity 
car, and which was, of course, used for the convenience of carrier as well 
as shippers. 

Under Rule 6, Section 2 (b) where shipper pays for a weight of 24,000 lbs. 
or more, marking requirements is waived. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds that both shipper and 
carrier was somewhat at fault in that, according to the evidence developed 
by correspondence, shipper was, to say the least, indifferent to his own 
interest in not seeing that a small car was furnished for the small load 
of stone; that the railroad agent was indifferent to the best interest of 
shipper in not at least advising shipper of the additional cost to him in 
using the large car compared with the use of a smaller car, and in that 
view a compromise will, in the Commission's opinion, be fair to both 
sides. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Southern Railway be, and it is 
hereby ordered and directed to apply a minimum weight of 54,000 lbs. on 
the shipment in question, which is based upon 90 per cent of marked 
capacity of car of 60,000 lb. capacity, which is the capacity car generally 
in use in this territory; and to refund on the shipment to the Atlantic 
Marble & Tile Company, at Charlotte, N. C, the sum of nine dollars and 
forty-five cents ($9.45), with six (6%) per cent, interest from June 15, 1929. 

It is Further Ordered, That this refund be made on or before March 1, 
1930; and that the Carolina and Northwestern Railroad be, and it is hereby 
ordered and directed to settle its proper share of this overcharge with the 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 7 

Southern Railway through claim channels in the customary manner when 

bill is presented to them. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

February 12, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7013. 

ATLANTIC MARBLE AND TILE COMPANY v. SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILr 
WAY (L. R. POWELL, Jr., AND E. W. SMITH, RECEIVERS), Overcharge 
on car crushed stone from Greystone, N. C, to Durham, N. C. 

Order 

This is claim for $9.04, overcharge on S. A. L. car 96807, covered by Sea- 
board Air Line Railway, Greystone, N. C, bill of lading, dated January 
5, 1931, in which is included the following indorsement: "60,000 lb. capacity 
car ordered, above car furnished." The above car, it appears, is a 100,000 lbs. 
capacity and was billed out at 90,000 lbs., as against actual scale weight 
of 63,400 lbs. The rate is 68 cents per ton. The car was delivered at Dur- 
ham, N. C, on freight bill No. 182, dated January 7, 1931, and $30.60 collected, 
plus $2.25 for trackage to Duke University. 

The Commission has repeatedly held, and so finds in this case that: 
"Where a carrier, for its own convenience, provides a car of greater capacity 
than that ordered by shipper, charges shall be assessed on basis of minimum 
weight fixed for car of capacity ordered; provided the shipment could 
have been loaded into car of the capacity ordered; and provided, further, 
that where a car of greater capacity is accepted by shipper and loaded 
beyond the loading capacity of car ordered, the minimum weight shall be 
that of a car of stencilled capacity next above the actual weight of shipment." 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Seaboard Air Line Railway, L. R. 
Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, Receivers, be and it is hereby ordered and 
directed to refund to Atlantic Marble & Tile Company, Charlotte, N. C, the 
sum of $9.04, this refund to be made on or before August 15, 1931, with six 
per cent interest from January 7, 1931. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This July 29, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7095. 

ATLANTIC MARBLE AND TILE COMPANY v. SEABOARD AIR LINE RAIL- 
WAY (L. R. POWELL, Jr., AND E. W. SMITH, RECEIVERS), Overcharge 
on Car Crushed Stone from Graystone, N. C, to Durham, N. C. 

Order 

Effective date of order in the above matter, dated July 29, 1931, is hereby 

postponed until a date to be later fixed pending hearing, which has been 

requested the Seaboard Air Line Railway, and which will be allowed, 
date for which announcement will later be made. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 10th day of August, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7095. 



8 'N. C. CoRPOKATioN Commission 

EARNHARDT MANUFACTURING COMPANY v. SOUTHERN RAILWAY 
COMPANY. 

Okdee 

This is a claim for straight overcharge, amount Nine Dollars and Eighty 
($9.80) Cents on account of use of erroneous minimum weight on carload 
of Textile Machinery, Southern 14544, covered by Graham, N. C. to Charlotte, 
N. C, waybill 1297 dated March 16, 1929, consigned to Earnhardt Manufactur- 
ing Company and collection of freight being made on Charlotte, N. C. 
Freight Bill No. 1141-J, dated March 19, 1929. 

Actual weight of shipment was 17,000 pounds, billed as 24,000 pounds 
minimum, rate 24^/^ cents per 100 pounds, amount collected $58,80; correct 
minimum weight is 20,000 pounds, rate 24i^ cents; correct amount $49.00, 
overcharge of $9.80, 

It is ordered that the Southern Railway be and it is hereby ordered and 
directed to refund overcharge as above amounting to $9.80, with interest, 
to the Earnhardt Manufacturing Company, Charlotte, N. C, through its 
traffic representative, W. S. Creighton, on or before March 25, 1932. 

Ey order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 14th day of March, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7239. 

CAPE FEAR RAILWAYS, INCORPORATET) v. ATLANTIC COAST LINE 
RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Order 

At a special session of the North Carolina Corporation Commission, com- 
posed of W. T. Lee, Chairman, George P. Pell and Stanley Winborne, 
Commissioners, at the offices of the Commission at Raleigh, N. C, on the 
5th day of February, 1931, at which the Chairman and Commissioners, afore- 
said, were present, and also in attendance W. G. Womble, being Director 
of Railroad Transportation of said Commission, there came on for con- 
sideration the following: 

In connection with the order and certificate of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, dated December 26, 1930, in Finance Docket 8254, granting 
the Cape Fear Railways, Inc., a certificate of public convenience and necessity 
to operate as a common carrier, the status of the Cape Fear Railways, Inc., 
as an interstate common carrier being before the Commission: and it being 
made to appear to the Commission that shipments were now actually 
moving from points in North Carolina which are consigned and destined 
to Fort Eragg, N. C, and which are being moved by the Cape Fear Rail- 
ways, Inc., from the junction point at Fort Eragg Junction to the destination 
at Fort Eragg, N. C, unaccompanied by revenue freight bills customary 
in the interchange of freight between carriers showing point of origin, 
shipper, consignee and destination, rate, weight and revenue. And it 
being made to appear that rates published to the Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road station of Fort Eragg Junction (Fort Eragg), N. C, do not lawfully 
apply to Fort Eragg, N. C, the local station on the Cape Fear Railways, 
Inc.; and a shipment destined to Fort Eragg, N. C, has not reached 
destination when tendered for delivery at Fort Eragg Junction, N. C. 



Decisions a]\d Adjustments of Complaints . 9 

And it being made to appear that rates between points in the State of 
North Carolina and Fort Bragg are at present published as follows: Agent 
J. H. Glenn's Southern Rate Basis (Freight Tariff No. 89-B), I. C. C. 
A-725 provides Manchester, N. C, rates from points published in Agent 
J. J. Cottrell's Freight Tariff No. 98-A, I. C. C. No. 752, section 1 thereof, to 
Fort Bragg, N. C, on the Cape Fear Railways, Inc. In some instances rates 
in Agent J. J. Cottrell's I. C. C. 752 are restricted not to apply on traffic 
moving to Fort Bragg, reference being made to Section 6 for rates. Section 
6 of this tariff refers to distance tables of various carriers for distances in 
ascertaining the lawful rate. While Cape Fear Railways, Inc., is a participat- 
ing carrier in Section 6 of said tariff, this line does not have a distance 
table showing the mileage between Fort Bragg Junction and Fort Bragg 
that could be referred to and consequently rates cannot be ascertained. 

Cape Fear Railways, Inc., does not participate in commodity rates pub- 
lished in Agent J. J. Cottrell's North Carolina Tariff, I. C. C. 767 and no 
basis is provided for arriving at rates to Fort Bragg in connection with the 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad via Fort Bragg Junction. 

And it being made to further appear the Cape Fear Railways, Inc., has 
filed with this Commission, effective May 13, 1930, its Rate Issue No. 1, 
purporting to apply rates between points in North Carolina and Fort Bragg, 
N. C, the same as between points in North Carolina and Fort Bragg Junc- 
tion, N. C, which Rate Issue does not bear the concurrence of the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad Company; 

And it being made further to appear that Fort Bragg, N. C, is a local 
station on the Cape Fear Railways, Inc., alone; 

And it being made to appear that Fort Bragg Junction (Fort Bragg), 
N. C, is a station on the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, to which 
the Cape Fear Railways, Inc., has only recently extended its common carrier 
service; 

And it being made to further appear the Cape Fear Railways," Inc., by 
H. A. Page, Jr., its President, stands ready and willing to join with the 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad to establish through rates and joint rates 
to and from Fort Bragg, N. C, via. Fort Bragg Junction the same as the 
rates to Fort Bragg Junction, N. C, or to Fort Bragg, N. C, via the route 
through Skibo in connection with the Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad, 
and the Commission having considered the matters and things hereinabove 
set out and referred to, 
Now IT IS Ordeeed : 

1. That the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company shall immediately 
cease and desist from the unlawful receipt and transportation of traffic 
between points in North Carolina and Fort Bragg, N. C, for which no lawful 
rates are^. published, maintained and filed with this Commission. 

2. That the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad shall immediately cease and 
desist from the practice of receiving and handling intrastate traffic destined 
to Fort Bragg by tendering it for delivery to Fort Bragg Junction (Fort 
Bragg), N. C. 

3. That on all traffic for which there are rates duly published and filed 
with this Commission to and from Fort Bragg, N. C, in connection with 



10 N. C. Corporation Commission 

the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, that Company shall furnish to 
the Cape Fear Railways, Inc., regular revenue waybills to accompany the 
cars and to be delivered with the cars at the time the shipments are 
interchanged. 

4. That this order shall take effect on this the fifth day of February, 
1931. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 5th day of February, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7009. 

CAPE FEAR RAILWAYS, INCORPORATED, v. ATLANTIC COAST LINE 
RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Order 

The Commission having heard the argument of the Respondent, the 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, that the Commission is without 
authority to issue its Order of February 5, 1931, in this matter; and the 
Commission having considered the argument concludes: That the order is, 
and shall be, treated upon the resistance by the Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road Company as an order to show cause why it should not be required to 
exchange revenue bills with the Cape Fear Railways, Incorporated, at Fort 
Bragg Junction. 

As to that part of the Order requiring the publication of through rates 
through Fort Bragg Junction to Fort Bragg, it is the opinion of the 
Commission, and it so holds, that the Order of the Commission is, and for 
the purposes of this hearing shall be treated as, an order to show cause 
why the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company shall not be required to 
publish said through rates. 

Upon this conclusion of the Commission, the Respondent, the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad Company, is given the opportunity to present its evi- 
dence, if any it has, as to why it should not be required to furnish to the 
Cape Fear Railways, Incorporated, revenue bills at Fort Bragg Junction and 
publish through rates through Fort Bragg Junction to Fort Bragg. 

By order of the Commission: ' R. O. Self, 

This 17th day of February, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7009. 

COMPLAINT OF CAPE FEAR RAILWAYS, INCORPORATED v. ATLANTIC 
COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Order for Suspension of A. C. L. R. R. G. F. O. 8710 (Supplement A to 
Miscellaneous Charges, Rules and Regulations Tariff No. 10). 

Order 

The above tariff, issued by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, July 3, 
effective July 8, 1931, was received by the Commission on July 6, giving 
notice to agents and connecting lines requiring full prepay on all property 
from initial points of origin to destinations on the Cape Fear Railways, Inc., 
except such shipments as are moving on government bills of lading. The 



Decisions akd Adjustments of Complaints 11 

provisions of this tariff are protested by H. A. Page, Jr., President, Cape 
Fear Railways, Inc., for account of his Company, in letter of blank date, 
requesting that opportunity for hearing be given. 

After due consideration, the Commission is of the opinion, and so finds 
that under the rules of the Commission, and statutes imposed by law, 
it appears unreasonable that important changes such as called for by this 
tariff should be made without good reasons be shown, which could have 
been done by application to the Commission; moreover, it appears reason- 
able that more notice to the public should be given than called for by the 
effective date of the tariff. 

It is Theeeforb Ordered, That A. C. L. R. R. Tariff G. F. O. 8710, (Sup- 
plement A to Miscellaneous Charges, Rules and Regulations Tariff No. 10), 
effective July 8, 1931, be and the same is hereby suspended and shall not 
become effective until so ordered by the Commission. 

It is Further Ordered, That hearing in the matter be had in the court 
room, at the office of the Corporation Commission in Raleigh, Wednesday, 
July 15, at 10:00 a.m., and that notice to this effect be given the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad Company and Cape Fear Railways, Inc. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 7th day of July, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7009. 



EQUITABLE FREIGHT ADJUSTMENT BUREAU, PATTON PACKAGE 
COMPANY, CORBETT PACKAGE COMPANY, MOUNT OLIVE MANU- 
FACTURING COMPANY V. ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD COM- 
PANY AND ALL OTHER COMMON CARRIERS BY RAIL WITHIN THE 
STATE. 

In the matter of rates on Fruit or Berry Crates, and Vegetable Baskets or 
Hampers, in Straight or Mixed Carloads, between points in North 
Carolina. 

Supplementai. Order 

By order of this Commission dated March 29, 1927, a scale of rates on 
Fruit or Berry Crates, and Vegetable Baskets, or Hampers, in straight or 
mixed carloads, was found reasonable between points in North Carolina on 
intrastate traffic. This scale does not exceed 300 miles. It now develops 
that there is a prospective movement from manufacturing points to destina- 
tions situated more than 300 miles from said manufacturing points and 
there being no protest to the extension of the present scale to and including 
500 miles. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the said scale shall be extended beyond 
300 miles as follows: 



standard Single Line 


Standard Joint Line 


231/2 


27 


241/2 


28 


251/2 


29 


261/2 


30 


271/2 


31 


281/2 


32 


291/2 


33 


301/2 


34 


3IV2 


35 


321/2 


36 



12 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Miles 

320 miles and over 300 

340 miles and over 320 

360 miles and over 340 

380 miles and over 360 

400 miles and over 380 

420 miles and over 400 

440 miles and over 420 

460 miles and over 440 

480 miles and over 460 

500 miles and over 480 

It is Puether Ordered, That except as provided herein the original order 
shall remain in force, and 

It is Further Ordered, That these rates shall be published to become 
effective on September 6, 1932. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 26th day of August, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6549. 

EQUITABLE FREIGHT ADJUSTMENT BUREAU, PATTON PACKAGE 
COMPANY, CORBETT PACKAGE COMPANY, MOUNT OLIVE MANU- 
FACTURING COMPANY V. ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD COM- 
PANY AND ALL OTHER COMMON CARRIERS BY RAIL WITHIN THE 
STATE. 

In the matter of rates on Fruit or Berry Crates, and Vegetable Baskets or 
Hampers, in Straight or Mixed Carloads, between points in North Carolina. 

Second Supplemental Order 

It having been shown to our satisfaction that carriers are unable to 
comply with the effective date of our Supplementary Order issued August 26, 
1932 in the above matter, wherein the scale of rates on Fruit or Berry 
Crates and Vegetable Baskets or Hampers was extended to and including 
500 miles, and request being made for postponement of the effective date. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the effective date of the said Supplemental 
Order issued August 26, 1932, be postponed to September 21, 1932. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 8th day of September, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6549. 

PETITION OP GOLDSBORO LUMBER COMPANY FOR LICENSE TO 
HAUL FREIGHT AS A LOGGING RAILROAD. 

Order 

This is a petition of the Goldsboro Lumber Company, dated January 14, 
1931, setting forth that this company is a corporation with its principal 
office and place of business at Dover, Craven County, North Carolina; that 
the company operates a logging railroad known as the Dover South-Bound 
Railroad, which is a standard gauge line running from Dover southwardly 
to Richlands, in Onslow County, with sidings at Foys Crossing, Taylors 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 13 

Crossing, Phillips Crossing, Wimsatt and Comfort in Jones County, and 
Petersburg in Onslow County; that there is a limited amount of freight 
that would normally move in and out and over the logging road, provided 
petitioner is authorized to transport such commodities, other than its 
own, between points on its line, and to charge therefor reasonable rates. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds, that the common carrier, 
formerly known as the Dover and Southbound Railroad, having having recently 
been permitted by the Interstate Commerce Commission to abondon its charter 
as a common carrier, and that in view of the petition of Goldsboro Lumber 
Company to accommodate shippers along the line by hauling freight as long 
as it operates this logging tram it should be permitted to do so; 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Goldsboro Lumber Company operating 
a logging tramroad, known as the Dover-South-Bound Railroad, be and they 
are hereby authorized and directed to transport commodities, by freight, 
as herein mentioned other than its own over and upon said logging road, 
and to charge therefor the following: 

Coal, $15.00 per car 60,000 lbs., excess in proportion. 

Cottonseed, $20.00 per car 24,000 lbs., excess in proportion. 

Fertilizer, $30.00 per car 40,000 lbs., excess in proportion. 

Gasoline "j 

Kerosene > $40.00 per car 40,000 lbs., excess in proportion. 

Lubricating Oil ) 

Agricultural Lime, $30.00 per car 60,000 lbs., excess in proportion. 

Brick, $20.00 per car 50,000 lbs., excess in proportion. 

Sand, $15.00 per car 50,000 lbs., excess in proportion. 

Rock or Gravel, $17.50 per car 50,000 lbs., excess in proportion. 

Cement, $35.00 per car 50,000 lbs., excess in proportion. 

Sewer Pipe, $17.50 per car 25,000 lbs., excess in proportion. 

Logs, (except Pine) $13.00 per car 40,000 lbs., excess in proportion. 

All other commodities $2.00 per ton. 

Maximum load, car and contents, 100,000 lbs. 

Carload shipments handled only. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 16th day of January, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7002. 

ROGER MOORE'S SONS & COMPANY v. SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 
(L. R. POWELL, Jr., AND E. W. SMITH, RECEIVERS). 

Order 

This claim., amount $6.59, covered by Seaboard Air Line Railway Clay- 
brick, N. C, bill of lading, dated August 15, 1930, covering S. A. L.-79816, 
loaded with 13,500 common brick consigned to U. A. Underwood, Wilming- 
ton, N. C, weight 61,695 lbs., being billed out at capacity of car of 80,000 
lbs., and charged at correct rate of 3.6 cents per 100 lbs., freight charges 
$28.80, switching charge $2.25, total $31.05, covered by Seaboard Air Line 
Railway Wilmington, N. C, Freight Bill No. 296, dated August 16, 1930. 

The bill of lading shows 60,000 lb. capacity car ordered, and therefore 
the weight should be 61,695 lbs. and freight charges $22.21, plus switching 
charge of $2.25, total $24.46, overcharge in freight revenue $6.59. 



14 N. C. CoEPORATioN Commission 

The Commission has previously and repeatedly held where 60,000 lbs. 
capacity cars are ordered by shipper he shall have the benefit of such 
capacity car and not be required to pay on basis of higher minimum 
capacity car which is furnished at the convenience of the carrier. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Seaboard Air Line Railway, (L. R. 
Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, Receivers) be and it is hereby ordered and 
directed to settle this overcharge claim with Roger Moore's Sons & Com- 
pany, claimant, at Wilmington, N. C, amount $6.59, on or before February 
25, 1932. 

By direction of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 9th day of February, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7225. 

ROGER MOORE'S SONS & COMPANY v. SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 
(L. R. POWELL, Jr., AND E. W. SMITH, RECEIVERS). 

Obdeb 

This is a claim of Roger Moore's Sons Company, Wilmington, N. C, cover- 
ing straight overcharge in rate and freight charges on S. A. L.-10181, loaded 
with 13,500 common brick. Seaboard Air Line Railway bill of lading, dated 
Claybrick, N. C, August 13, 1930, consigned to U. A. Underwood, Wilmington, 
N. C, delivery being made upon Wilmington, N. C, Freight Bill No. 254, 
dated August, 14, 1930, and charges collected on basis of 61,695 lbs., at 
4.5 cents per 100 lbs., freight charges $27.76, switching charges $2.25, total 
$30.01; whereas correct rate is 3.6 cents per 100 lbs., weight 61,695 lbs., 
and correct freight charges $22.21, plus $2.25 switching charge, total $24.46, 
overcharge in freight revenue $5.55. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Seaboard Air Line Railway, (L. R. 
Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, Receivers) be and they are hereby ordered 
and directed to refund Roger Moore's Sons & Company, claimants, the over- 
charge amounting to $5,55 on or before February 25, 1932. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 9th day of February, 1932. Clerk, 

Docket No. 7225. 

IN RE: PETITION OF THE NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COM- 
PANY FOR PERMISSION TO DISCONTINUE TRAINS NOS. 7 AND 10, 
BETWEEN GOLDSBORO AND BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

This cause came on to be heard before the Commission upon the applica- 
tion of the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company for permission to dis- 
continue Trains Nos. 7 and 10 now operated by that company between Golds- 
boro, North Carolina, and Beaufort, North Carolina, over its line of railroad 
leased by the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad Company, said lease 
now being held by the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. 

Hearing was held before the Commission on January 20, 1931, after notice 
had been given to the mayors of towns along the line of the railroad and 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 15 

after objections had been filed by the Town of Beaufort, the County of 
Carteret, other governmental units, and individuals. 

It is found by the Commission from the evidence before it that the lease 
executed by the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad Company and now 
held by the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company, among other things, 
provides that the lessee shall "maintain in the operation of said railroad, 
a regular train service, both passenger and freight, at least equal to that 
which has been in operation for the twelve months prior to the execution 
of this lease." 

The Norfolk Southern Railroad Company has failed to establish, under 
the lease and its application, its right to a granting of the petition, and the 
Commission finds as a fact that the petition should be denied. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the petition be, and it is hereby, dismissed. 
By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 9th day of April, 1931. Cleric, 

Docket No. 6984. 

IN RE: PETITION OP NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 
FOR PERMISSION TO DISCONTINUE TRAINS NOS. 7 AND 10 
BETWEEN GOLDSBORO AND BEAUFORT, N. C. 

Order OvERRiiLrNG Exceptions 

This order has reference to the above petition, in which the Commission 
Issued an order, dated April 9, 1931, dismissing the petition of the Norfolk 
Southern Railroad Company to discontinue Trains Nos. 7 and 10 between 
Goldsboro and Beaufort, North Carolina. The petitioner now excepts to 
the order of the Commission of April 9, 1931, and the Commission having 
considered all the exceptions filed by the petitioner on April sixteenth, 
through counsel, it is 

Ordered, That said exceptions be, and they are hereby, overruled. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 25th day of April, 1931. Clerk, 

Docket No. 6984. 

IN RE: PETITION OF NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 
FOR PERMISSION TO DISCONTINUE TRAINS 7 AND 10 BETWEEN 
GOLDSBORO AND BEAUFORT AND TO SUBSTITUTE TRAIN 
SCHEDULES SET OUT IN SUBSTITUTE PETITION FILED WITH THE 
COMMISSION ON OCTOBE'R 3, 1931. 

Ordeb 

This cause coming on to be heard before the Commission upon the 
amended and substituted petition of the Norfolk Southern Railroad Com- 
pany for permission to discontinue Trains Nos. 7 and 10, now being operated 
by that company between Goldsboro, North Carolina, and Beaufort, North 
Carolina, over its line of railway leased from the Atlantic and North 
Carolina Railroad, said lease now being held by the Norfolk Southern Rail- 
road Company, and to substitute in lieu thereof an extended service of the 



16 'N. C. Corporation Commission 

train from New Bern to Marsden, North Carolina, substantially on the 
present schedule of Trains Nos. 7 and 10 between New Bern and Beaufort. 

The Commission, after hearing the evidence adduced at the hearing and 
after considering the various petitions from the chambers of commerce, 
civic organizations and citizens of the various towns affected, expressing 
their approval of said substitute schedule, finds as a fact that public con- 
venience and necessity does not longer require the operation of Trains 
Nos 7 and 10 between Goldsboro and New Bern; that the substitute schedule 
as aforesaid is ample for the needs of the people living along the line of 
the railroad between Beaufort and New Bern; and that the said substitute 
schedule will give substantially the same service as is now being rendered 
by said Trains Nos. 7 and 10 between New Bern and Beaufort; wherefore, 
it is now 

Ordered and Adjudged, That the petitioning railroad company be allowed 
and authorized to discontinue the operation of Trains Nos. 7 and 10 
between New Bern and Goldsboro and that the operation of Trains 7 and 
10 between New Bern and Beaufort be continued* by extending the service 
now existing between Marsden, North Carolina, and New Bern, North 
Carolina, to Beaufort, North Carolina, on the schedule set out in the 
amended and substituted petition; and, the order heretofore made by the 
Commission upon the application of the petitioner, from which appeal has 
been taken, is, therefore, m^odified to the extent herein set out. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 15th day of October, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6984. 

IN THE MATTER OP NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Order Concerning Telegraph Station at Jackson Springs, North Carolina. 

The petition of Norfolk Southern Railroad Company for leave to abandon 
the telegraph service heretofore rendered by it at Jackson Springs, North 
Carolina, being duly considered, the Court finds that the facts are as stated 
in the said petition and that the relief prayed for should be granted and 
this order should be made: And accordingly 

It is Ordered, That the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company be and it is, 
allowed forthwith to discontinue and abandon the rendering of telegraph 
service at the station Jackson Springs, North Carolina. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

. This 18th day of January, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7212. 

IN THE MATTER OP NORPOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Order Conceuntng Telegraph Stations at Linden, North Carolina, and 

Kipling, North Carolina. 

The petition of Norfolk Southern Railroad Company for leave to abandon 
the telegraph service heretofore rendered by it at Linden, North Carolina, 
and Kipling, North Carolina, being duly considered, the Court finds that 



North Carolina Sfate Library 
Raiaigd 

Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 17 

the facts are as stated in the said petition and that the relief prayed for 
should he granted and this order should be made: And accordingly 

It is Ordered, That the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company be and it 
is allowed forthwith to discontinue and abandon the rendering of telegraph 
service at the stations Linden, North Carolina, and Kipling, North Carolina. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 6th day of February, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7222. 

IN THE MATTER OF NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Order Concerning Telegraph Station at Middlesex, North Cx\rolina. 

The petition of Norfolk Southern Railroad Company for leave to abandon 
the telegraph service heretofore rendered by it at Middlesex, North Caro- 
lina, being duly considered, the Court finds that the facts are as stated in 
the said petition and that the relief prayed for should be granted and this 
order should be made: And accordingly 

It is Ordered, That the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company be and it is 
allowed forthwith to discontinue and abandon the rendering of telegraph 
service at the station Middlesex, North Carolina. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 25th day of February, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket Np. 7234. 

IN THE MATTER OF NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Order, Concerning Telegraph Station at Centek Hill, North Carolina. 

The petition of Norfolk Southern Railroad Company for leave to abandon 
the telegraph service heretofore rendered by it at Center Hill, North Caro- 
lina, being duly considered, the Court finds that the facts are as stated 
in the said petition, and that the relief prayed for should be granted and this 
order should be made: And accordingly 

It is Ordered, That the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company be and it is 
allowed forthwith to discontinue and abandon the rendering of telegraph 
service at the station Center Hill, North Carolina. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 14th day of April, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7256. 

IN RE: APPLICATION OF NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 
FOR PERMISSION TO DISCONTINUE THE OPETIATION OF TRAINS 
NOS. 3 AND 4, BETWEEN RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA, AND NOR- 
FOLK, VIRGINIA. 

Order 

The petitioner in this case asks for discontinuance of Trains Nos. 3 and 4, 

now being operated between Raleigh, North Carolina, and Norfolk, Virginia. 

These trains are usually composed of a compartment passenger car, an 

express car, a mail car, and a Pullman car. The petition was filed with 

2 



18 N. C. Corporation Commission 

the Commission after the petitioner had given notice that it would dis- 
continue its interstate Pullman service on these trains between Raleigh, 
North Carolina, and Norfolk, Virginia. The Pullman service was discon- 
tinued probably for two reasons; one, because of the decrease in business; 
and the other, because the Pullman Company had given notice of an increase 
in its rates from 2.5 to 4 cents per mile. 

Notice was given to the principal cities along the line served by these 
trains and a number of them were represented at the hearing, at which it 
appeared to be the general opinion that if satisfactory express and mail 
service could be continued, opposition to discontinuing the trains in ques- 
tion would be withdrawn. The petitioner offered to guarantee the con- 
tinuance of adequate express service to the principal towns, but could not 
guarantee anything about the mail service because that was beyond the 
petitioner's jurisdiction; however, information was presented which would 
indicate that the Post Office authorities had indicated to interested parties 
that satisfactory mail service could be arranged within a reasonable time; 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petitioner be, and is hereby, authorized to discontinue 
its Trains Nos. 3 and 4 between Raleigh, North Carolina, and the North 
Carolina-Virginia State Line when arrangements have been made by the 
petitioner for the continuance of adequate express service and when the 
Post Office Department has had sufficient notice to take its usual action 
with regard to discontinuance of mail trains, effective date for taking off 
such trains to be not earlier than July 1, 1932. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 21st day of June, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7279. 

IN RE: APPLICATION OF NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 
FOR PERMISSION TO DISCONTINUE THE OPERATION OF TRAINS 
NOS. 3 AND 4, BETWE'EN RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA, AND 
NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. 

Ordek Amending Commission's Order of June 21, 1932 

Now comes The Pullman Company and demurs to the Order of this Com- 
mission of June 21, 1932, in that reference to its notice of increase in car 
mileage rates is not sufficiently explanatory to differentiate it from pas- 
senger fare mileage rates; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the Commission's Order of June 21, 1932, In Re: Application 
of Norfolk Southern Railroad Company for Permission to Discontinue the 
Operation of Trains Nos. 3 and 4, between Raleigh, North Carolina, and 
Norfolk, Virginia, be, and it is hereby, amended, as follows: In the last 
line of paragraph one, between the words "per" and "mile," insert the word 
"car," and strike out the period at the end of said line, adding after the 
word "mile" the following: "operated in its mileage rates charged the rail- 
road company for use of the cars." 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 11th day of July, 1932. ClerJt. 

Docket No. 7279. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 19 

APPLICATION FOR ABANDONMENT BY THE OCONA LUFTY RAILROAD 
COMPANY AS A COMMON CARRIER. 

Order 

Comes now the Ocona Lufty Railroad Company, by petition filed by its 
President, Reuben B. Robertson, dated January 11, 1932, and sets forth: 

1. That the Ocona Lufty Railroad Company owns and until recently 
operated a line of railroad ten and a half miles in length from Ravensford 
to a point known as Beach Flats, all in Swain County, North Carolina; 
that by virtue of its charter and actual operation this line never did handle 
interstate commerce; that the road was bought primarily for hauling timber 
products from the land of the Champion Fibre Company; that the said land 
of the Champion Fibre Company has now been secured as part of the Great 
Smoky Mountain Park; and that the land is now being used by the United 
States government for park purposes. 

2. That the land along the line of railroad formerly owned by the Cham- 
pion Fibre Company has also been taken for park purposes; that the people, 
who lived along said line of railroad have moved and that there is no freight 
or passengers to be hauled over the said line; that the Ocona Lufty Rail- 
road Company has filed with the Secretary of State of North Carolina a cer- 
tificate of dissolution of said company. 

In view of the facts as recited herein the Commission is of the opinion 
and so finds that the Ocona Lufty Railroad Company should be authorized 
to cancel rates now on file and in effect. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Ocona Lufty Railroad Company be, and 
It is hereby authorized to disregard rates now on file with this Commission, 
and that the said line is hereby relieved from carrying intrastate commerce 
as prayed for in the application, herein referred to; that this order be in 
force and effect from and after this date. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 18th day of January, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7207. 

IN THE MATTER OF CLAIM OF E. A. POE BRICK COMPANY v. 
ABERDEEN AND ROCKFISH RAILROAD COMPANY, SEABOARD AIR 
LINE RAILWAY COMPANY (L. R. POWELL, Jr., AND E. W. SMITH, 
RECEIVERS). 

Order 

This is a claim of complainant above named, through Southern Traffic 
Service, J. B. Dickinson, Manager, Wilmington, N. C. covering alleged 
overcharge of nine ($9.00) dollars on car of common brick shipped from 
Fayetteville, N. C. covered by Aberdeen and Rockfish, Payetteville Bill of 
Lading dated February 26, 1930, N. C. car 13970, containing 12,000 common 
brick consigned tO|feridgers Corporation, Bladenboro, N. C, Seaboard Air 
Line Bladenboro freight bill No. 2 dated March 3, 1930 shows weight of 
60,000 pounds and rate of 7i^ cents per 100 pounds, total collected $45.00. 
Claimant furnishes an affidavit dated June 2, 1932 by J. C. Poe, Secretary, 
to the effect that a car only of sufficient capacity to load 60,000 pounds of 



20 ^. C. Corporation Commission 

brick was ordered from the Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad to carry thi& 
shipment. The rate on common brick, carload, from Fayetteville, N. C. to 
Bladenboro, N. C, in effect at time of shipment, was six (6) cents per 100 
pounds. It is 

Theeefore Oedered, That the Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad and the Sea- 
board Air Line Railway (L. R. Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, Receivers) 
be, and they are hereby, ordered and directed to refund overcharge on this 
shipment of nine ($9.00) dollars through Southern Traffic Service, J. B. 
Dickinson, Manager, Wilmington, N. C. That this refund be made with 
six (6%) per cent interest, settlement to be made on or before June 20. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 8th day of June, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7297. 

IN THE' MATTER OP CLAIM OF E. A. POE BRICK COMPANY v. 
ABERDEEN AND ROCKFISH RAILROAD COMPANY, SEABOARD AIR 
LINE RAILWAY COMPANY (L. R. POWELL, Jr., AND E. W. SMITH 
RECEIVERS). 

Order 

Since our Order of June 8 in the above matter it had developed this claim 
was paid by Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad Company by check No. 20512, 
Amount $10.50, on November 10, 1930. Receipt of which has been ac- 
knowledged, it is 

Therefore Oedeeed, That the Commission's Order of June 8, 1932 in the 
above entitled claim is hereby withdrawn and cancelled. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 25th day of June, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7297. 

RALEIGH GRANITE COMPANY v. ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 
COMPANY AND SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY COMPANY (L. R. 
POWELL, Jr. AND E. W. SMITH, RECEIVERS). 

Order 

This is claim of Raleigh Granite Company, overcharge in weight on 
S. A. L. car No. 99243, covered by S. A. L. Greystone, N. C. Bill of Lading 
dated April 27, 1931, shipped by Raleigh Granite Company, consigned to 
Rocky Mount Road District, Rocky Mount, N. C; bill of lading endorsed 
"60,000 capacity car ordered." 

The A. C. L. Rocky Mount paid freight bill No. 17014 dated April 29, 1931 
shows actual weight 60,800 pounds, charged for 90,000 pounds, rate $1.15 
per net ton, amount collected $51.75. 

Our Commission having repeatedly held shippers have a right to order 
capacity car to fit their shipment provided capacity ordered is that of com- 
mon use in the territory. 

We find shipper has been overcharged in this case to the extent of the 
difference between actual weight of 60,800 pounds and 90,000 pounds as 
charged. This difference figures out $16.83. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 21 

It is Theeefore Ordered, That the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company 
and Seaboard Air Line Railway Company (L. R. Powell, Jr. and E. W. 
Smith, Receivers) be and they are hereby ordered and directed to refund 
Raleigh Granite Company, Raleigh, N. C, on or before September 10, 1932, 
$16.83, overcharge on car referred to in this order together with six (6%) 
per cent interest thereon from April 30, 1931. Bill of lading and paid 
freight bill are herewith transmitted to the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 
and that company is expected to make settlement and charge the Seaboard 
Air Line Railway Company in its regular method of settlement. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 26th day of August, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7341. 

SEABOARD SHALE BRICK AND TILE COMPANY v. ATLANTIC AND 
YADKIN RAILWAY COMPANY, SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 
(L. R. POWELL, Jr., AND E. W. SMITH, RECEIVERS). 

Order 

This is a claim of complainant, above named, through Traffic Manager 
Crefghton, of the Charlotte Shippers and Manufacturers Association, Char- 
lotte, N. C, covering alleged overcharge of $9.59, on car of common brick 
shipped from Shaleton, N. C, November 20, 1930, in S. A. L.-10921, con- 
taining 12,000 common brick, consigned to Borden Brick and Tile Company, 
Greensboro, N. C, routed S. A. L. to Sanford and A. and Y. beyond. Bill 
of lading states 60,000 lb. capacity car was ordered and 80,000 lb. capacity 
car was furnished. The Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Company's Greens- 
boro paid freight bill shows freight was collected on 80,000 lbs., although 
there was only 65,900 lbs. of brick in the car, which weight it was per- 
missible to load in a 60,000 lb. capacity car, which was ordered under 
the rule prevailing that shippers may load cars to 10 per cent above marked 
capacity of car. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds, that under circumstances 
as described above, shippers are entitled to receive benefits accruing in the 
use of capacity of car ordered. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Company, 
and Seaboard Air Line Railway (L. R. Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, Re- 
ceivers) be and they are hereby ordered and directed to refund to the 
Seaboard Shale Brick and Tile Company, through W. S. Creighton, T. M., Box 
55, Charlotte, N. C, overcharge of $9.59 on car of common brick, S. A. L.- 
10921, as described in the premises. This refund to be made with 6 per 
cent interest from November 29, 1930, on or before February 15, 1931. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 27th day of January, 1931. Cleric. 

Docket No. 7007. 



22 N. C. Corporation Commission 

IN THE MATTER OF COMPLAINT OF SEABOARD SHADE BRICK AND 
TILE COMPANY v. ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY COMPANY, 
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY (L. R. POWELL, Jr., AND E. W. 
SMITH, RECEIVERS). 

In Re: Order of the Commission, Dated January 27, 1931 

Oedeb 

Hearing was held in Raleigh, North Carolina, April 8, 1931, on petition 
of carriers, dated February 12, reading as follows: 

As this order involves a subject on which the carriers have been 
working for sometime in the hope of making the tariff requirements 
more clearly understood by carriers' agents and the public, we respect- 
fully request that the Commission's order requiring the payment of 
this refund on, or before February 14, be postponed to a future date which 
will allow time for the carriers to be heard on the subject. We respect- 
fully petition your honorable Commission to permit a formal hearing 
on a date which you will designate, and that the carriers be given an 
opportunity to show cause why this overcharge should not be paid and 
that rates on common brick should be assessed on basis of the present 
tariff requirements for the future. 

Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Company, 

By (S) A. L. Thompson, T. M., 
Seaboard Air Line Railway, 

(L. R. Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, Receivers.) 

Appearing at the hearing for carriers were: G. R. Ward, Commerce Agent, 
Seaboard Air Line Railway (L, R. Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, Receivers) ; 
L. A, Kienzle, Assistant to General Freight Agent, Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroad Company; A. L. Thompson, Traffic Manager, Atlantic and Yadkin 
Railway Company; and D. J. Watson, Assistant General Freight Agent, 
Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Company, and protested against the order of 
the Commission, dated January 27, upon the general ground that the 
carriers are entitled to receive revenue on common brick traffic based upon 
the full minimum capacity of equipment furnished, regardless of equip- 
ment ordered by shippers, and appeared to rely upon the decision of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission in 155 I. C. C. 750 wherein that Com- 
mission states: 

In all territories where we have prescribed the 80 per cent basis on 
common brick — Southern, Central and Western Trunk Line — we have 
made loading to car capacity a condition precedent to the application 
of such rates. That the traffic is susceptible of such loading is not 
disputed. 

There is no question here but that it is plain the Interstate Commerce 
Commission made car capacity loading the minimum on common brick, 
however, it did not thereby prohibit shippers from exercising what this 
Commission holds is their right to order any size cars generally in use 
in this territory, and to have carriers observe such orders; and the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission took this view in a recent case, 169 I. C. C. 
458, wherein it is stated: 

We find, that the failure of defendant, L. and N., to provide a tariff 
rule to the effect that when a car of the capacity or dimensions ordered 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 23 

by a shipper, provided for in tlie tariff, can not be furnished within a 
reasonable time and for its own convenience a larger car is furnished, 
such larger car shall be used upon the basis of the minimum weight 
applicable to the car ordered, but in no case upon the basis of less than 
the actual weight, provided the shipment could have been loaded upon 
or in a car of the size ordered, was unreasonable. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds, that under circumstances 
as described in order, dated January 27, 1931, shipper is entitled to receive 
benefits accruing in use of capacity of car ordered, 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Com- 
pany, and Seaboard Air Line Railway (L. R. Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, 
Receivers) be and they are hereby ordered and directed to refund to the 
Seaboard Shale Brick and Tile Company, through W. S. Creighton, T. M., 
Box 55, Charlotte, N. C, overcharge of twelve dollars and seventy-eight 
cents ($12.78)* on car of common brick, S. A. L.-10921, as described in above 
order; this refund to be made, with six per cent interest from November 
29, 1930, on or before May 15, 1931. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 23d day of April, 1931. Clerh. 

Docket No. 7007. 

IN THE MATTER OF COMPLAINT OP SEABOARD SHALE BRICK AND 
TILE COMPANY v. ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY COMPANY, 
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY (L. R. POWELL, Jr., AND E. W. 
SMITH, RECEIVERS). 

In Re: Order of the Commission dated April 23, 1931 

Ordeb 

In the matter of petition of the Seaboard Air Line Railway, (L. R. 
Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, Receivers) through Assistant Freight Traffic 
Manager Ketner, on behalf of itself and other principal railway carriers 
operating within the State of North Carolina, namely: Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroad, Atlantic and Yadkin Railway, Norfolk and Western Railway, 
Southern Railway, Clinchfield Railroad and Norfolk Southern Railroad, dated 
June 3, for reconsideration by our Commission of its action and for vacation 
by our Commision of its order, dated April 23, 1931, in the matter of 
Seaboard Shale Brick and Tile Company, and its Circular No. 346 of. 
April 24, 1931, in the matter of carload minimum weight on common brick, 
intrastate, between points in North Carolina; 

Upon due consideration by the Commission, it is 

Ordered, That the above petition be, and the same is hereby denied. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 11th day of June, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7007. 



*The amount of overcharge in order of January 27 was erroneously stated as $9.59. 



24 'N. C. Corporation Commission 

SEABOARD SHALE BRICK AND TILE COMPANY v. ATLANTIC AND 
YADKIN RAILWAY COMPANY, AND SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 
(L. R. POWELL, Jr., AND E. W. SMITH, RECEIVERS). 

Order 

This is a straight overcharge claim in favor of Seaboard Shale Brick and 
Tile Company, covered by Seaboard Air Line Railway Shaleton, N. C, bill 
of lading, dated February 3, 1930, S. A. L.-88547, containing 13,000 common 
brick, weight 62,920 lbs., billed at 8.5 cents per 100 lbs., total collected $53.49, 
which charge is covered by Atlantic and Yadkin Railway, King, N. C, 
Freight Bill 29, dated February 6; 1930. The bill of lading states: "80,000 lb. 
capacity car set in by local freight conductor who authorized shippers to 
load for 60,000 lbs. capacity." 

The correct rate on the shipment is 6.8 cents per 100 lbs., and the charge 
should be $42.79, overcharge $10.68. The correspondence has been sub- 
mitted to the carriers and apparently payment was declined by the erroneous 
impression that the car capacity had something to do' with the matter. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds that this is a straight 
overcharge and that the billing of the car on basis of actual weight was 
correct, the error occurring in the rate and extension of revenue. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway and 
Seaboard Air Line Railway, (L. R. Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, Re- 
ceivers), be and they are hereby ordered to settle the overcharge amounting 
to $10.68 on or before February 25, 1932. 

All papers, with copy of this order, are being served upon the Atlantic 
and Yadkin Railway, the destination line, which line is expected to pay 
the claim and charge proper proportion to the Seaboard Air Line Railway 
(L. R. Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, Receivers) in the regular way. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Sei.f, 

This 9th day of February, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7226. 

IN RE: APPLICATION OF THE SOUTHETIN RAILWAY SYSTEM FOR 
PERMISSION TO DISCONTINUE THE AGENCY STATIONS AT 
CHERRYFIELD AND PENROSE, NORTH CAROLINA, AND MAKE 
THEM PREPAY POINTS. 

Order 

These applications of the Southern Railway, through Superintendent 
Cooper of Asheville, dated July 16, 1930, seek the approval of the Com- 
mission for change in station service at Cherryfield, North Carolina, and 
Penrose, North Carolina, both of which are stations of the Southern Rail- 
way System located on its Toxaway Branch, from agency stations to prepay 
points. 

Cherryfield is located 7.1 miles south of Brevard and 2.6 miles north 
of Rosman, both of which are regular agency stations. While it is clear 
that the present revenue collected by the Southern Railway at Cherryfield 
would not justify the railroad company in keeping an agent there, the 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 25 

evidence presented at the hearing tended to show that there is some prospect 
for an improvement in the revenue at that point; it is, therefore, 

Ordered, That the application of the Southern Railway System for per- 
mission to discontinue Cherryfield as an agency station be, and it is hereby, 
denied for the present. 

In the case of the application to close Penrose, the revenue shows a con- 
tinuous decline, Penrose being only 4.8 miles from Etowah and 4.4 miles 
from Pisgah Forest and having a paved highway both to Etowah and to 
Pisgah Forest, distance counts for very little under such conditions and 
it does not appear that the people will be greatly inconvenienced by the 
closing of this agency; and, it is 

Ordered, That the Southern Railway System is hereby authorized to close 
Penrose, North Carolina, as an agency station and make it a prepay point. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 24th day of September, 1930. (Tlerk. 

Docket No. 6755. 

IN RE: APPLICATION OF SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY FOR 
PERMISSION TO MAKE ELMWOOD, NORTH CAROLINA, A NON- 
AGENCY STATION. 

Order 

This is the petition of the Southern Railway Company for permission 
to discontinue its agency at Elmwood, Iredell County, North Carolina. 
Hearing was held October 15, 1931, at which Mr. W. F. Cooper, Superin- 
tendent of the Southern Railway at Asheville, represented the petitioner 
and Mr. Hugh Mitchell, attorney at law of Statesville, North Carolina, 
represented the citizens of Elmwood, in Iredell County, North Carolina. 

From the evidence presented at the hearing, it is evident that the railroad 
company is deriving no profit from the operation of this station and it is 
thought that to discontinue the agency and make it a non-agency station 
with a caretaker will meet the necessities of the community, therefore, 
it is 

Orderei>, That the petitioner be, and it is hereby, authorized to discon- 
tinue said agency on or before November 15, 1931, placing a caretaker in 
charge. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Sejlf, 

This 3d day of November, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7101. 

IN RE: PETITION OF SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY FOR PERMIS- 
SION TO DISCONTINUE PASSENGER TRAINS NOS. NINETEEN 
AND TWENTY BETWEEN ASHEVILLE AND BRYSON CITY, NORTH 
CAROLINA. 

Order 

This petition was filed with and considered by the Commission in due 
course, and it was ascertained that the expense of operating these trains 



26 ^N". C. Corporation Commission 

has exceeded their revenue from all sources for each month since the month 
of October, 1930; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That, effective January 3, 1932, the petitioner be, and is hereby, 
authorized to discontinue the operation of Trains Nineteen and Twenty, 
between Asheville and Bryson City, North Carolina, until June 1, 1932, 
at which time the service furnished by these trains will be restored for the 
summer season. After their operation during the summer season, if, in 
the opinion of the Commission, there is any perceptible demand for con- 
tinuing the operation of these trains and if there is any appreciable increase 
in business handled by them, the service may be continued. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 21st day of December, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7182. 

TURNER WHITE COFFIN COMPANY v. SOUTHERN RAILWAY. 

Order 

This complaint, dated April 3, 1930, seeks reparation on movement of 
cofRn stock, in carloads, from North Wilkesboro, N. C, to Winston-Salem, 
N. C, based upon rate of 10 cents per 100 pounds in lieu of rate of 17 cents 
per 100 pounds as charged. 

All facts and argument were submitted in writing by Traffic Manager 
Prince of Greensboro, representing complainant, and copy thereof was trans- 
mitted by our Commission to Freight Traffic Manager Brown of the Southern 
Railway, Atlanta, Ga., suggesting he likewise submit in writing all facts 
and argument, and in this way avoid, if possible, the expense of a hearing. 
Mr. Brown's responses and proposal having been submitted to Mr. Prince, 
and found satisfactory for settlement of entire complaint. 

It is Therefore Ordered, TViat the Southern Railway be, and it is hereby 
ordered and directed to apply on the following cars of wooden coffin stock, 
carload, from North Wilkesboro, N. C, to Winston-Salem, N. C, rate of 12 
cents per 100 pounds and refund to complainants, Turner White Coffin Com- 
pany of Winston-Salem, N. C, the difference between the above rate and 17 
cents per 100 pounds, which was charged on these cars. 

Paid freight bills of the Southern Railway covering these cars are hereto 
attached and made a part of this order, as follows: 

"Waytill No. Freight Bill No. Car No. Date 

Southern Ry. 1695 9-14-29 
Southern Ry. 1449 10-10-29 
Southern Ry. 1196 11- 5-29 
Southern Ry. 2205 11-28-29 
Southern Ry. 1951 12-21-29 
Southern Ry. 1024 1-10-30 
Southern Ry. 1429 2-13-30 

It is Further Ordered, That this refund be made on or before July 20, 
1930. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 30th day of June, 1930. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6897. 



4313 


N.&W.— 40926 


W-S 


9-17-29 


2852 


W.M.— 24920 


W-S 


10-11-29 


1395 


P.R.R.— 573153 


W-S 


11- 5-29 


7777 


P.R.R.— 90716 


W-S 


11-29-29 


5223 


Sou.— 149590 


W-S 


1223-29 


4917 


E.S.L.L— 5052 


W-S 


1-21-30 


3695 


N.&W.— 64604 


W-S 


2-13-30 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 27 

APPLICATION OF COMMON CARRIERS (EXCEPT TRUCK LINES) TO 
MAKE EFFECTIVE ON INTRASTATE TRAFFIC INCREASE!:) FREIGHT 
RATES AND CHARGES AS PER DECISIONS OF THE INTERSTATE 
COMMERCE COMMISSION DATED OCTOBER 16, AND DECEMBER 5, 
1931, RESPECTIVELY, COMMONLY KNOWN AS 15 PER CENT RATE' 
INCREASE (EX PARTE 103). 

Order 

This is an application of the Common Carriers, through Chairman Til- 
ford of the Southern Group, dated June 20, 1931, and supplementary petition, 
dated December 19, 1931, seeking authority of this Commission authorizing 
increases in freight rates on intrastate traffic to the same extent as author- 
ized by the Interstate Commerce Commission on interstate traffic. The 
original application, known as the Fifteen Per Cent Increase Case (I. C. C. 
Ex Parte 103) was filed by the carriers simultaneously with the Federal 
Commission and each of the several State Commissions of the country, 
which application sets forth in more or less detail the precarious situation 
of the carriers resulting from depression in general business conditions. 
The application goes on, in substance, to relate that the powers of railway 
managements to meet these adverse conditions were limited in that they 
could not increase rates without the approval of Commissions; that they 
could not reduce scales of wages without long procedure through conferences 
and arbitration; they could furlough employees and they could refuse to 
purchase supplies; they could, and it was economically necessary that they 
should finish their unfinished program of capital expenditures and decline 
to embark on any new programs. 

The average annual expenditures of Class I carriers of the United States 
for maintenance for the five years — 1925 to 1929, inclusive, were $2,076,400,000, 
divided as follows: maintenance of way and structures $849,700,000; main- 
tenance of equipment $1,226,700,000. That in connection with efficiency 
and economy of operation the question may be raised whether railway wages 
are reasonable under existing conditions. That for the determination of 
railway wages there is a procedure prescribed by law. This procedure in- 
volves, in the case of a dispute, three steps, the last of which is alternative: 
1st, conferences between the railway managements and the representatives 
of railway labor; 2d, the intervention of Boards of Mediation in the event 
the conferences result in disagreement; 3d, arbitration in the event the two 
preceding steps fail; or, if either party refuses to arbitrate, a finding of facts 
by a Commission appointed by the President. That the issues presented in 
each of these steps are of great importance, and the economic facts necessary 
for their determination are not easy to assemble and consider. 

Representatives of railroads and union employees are to hold a conference 
in Chicago at an early date with a view to agreeing to some plan for ad- 
justment of tne wage question; however, in case a reduction is agreed upon 
such a savings to the railroads will be insufficient to meet the financial 
emergency of the weaker lines for whose benefit the increases hereinafter 
provided are authorized. 

The application further states: 



28 ]^. C. Corporation Commission 

The theory of the law is that railway property is private property af- 
fected with a public use; that in being devoted to such use it fore- 
goes exceptional opportunity for the assurance of fair return. If the 
sacrifice already made under conditions of prosperity is to be greatly 
enlarged because of conditions of adversity, the result is that railway 
property has become public property affected with a private obligation 
to maintain it. It cannot be expected that investors in railway securi- 
ties will assume and perform such an obligation. 

Under a cooperative agreement existing for years between the Interstate 
Commerce Commission and the several State Commissions, operative through 
the medium of the National Association of State Commissions, an invitation 
was extended and accepted whereby State Commissions participated in hear- 
ings in this case, which were held at the following places: Washington, D. C, 
Portland, Me., Atlanta, Ga., Dallas, Tex., Kansas City, Mo., Portland, 
Ore., San Francisco, Calif., Salt Lake City, Utah, and Chicago, 111. Steno- 
graphic reports of all hearings were furnished each State Commission. 

The Southern group of States south of the Potomac and East of the 
Mississippi River met and selected Mr. Hugh White, President of the 
Alabama Public Service Commission, and Harvey H. Hannah, President 
of the Tennessee Railroad and Public Utilities Commission, to act as repre- 
sentatives of the Southern States Commissions in the case. The North 
Carolina Corporation Commission presented testimony, as did other North 
Carolina interests at the Atlanta hearing. All parties having any interest 
in said proceedings were afforded an opportunity to be heard and it ap- 
pears were heard. The opinion of the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
participated in by representatives of the several State Commissions, was 
practically unanimous and for the benefit of the record in this case 
is quoted as the basis upon which this Commission follows the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission and the representative State Commissions in 
their conclusions: 

However sympathetic one may be with the plight of the railroads 
and their need for additional revenue, such sympathy cannot with 
benefit to any one be carried to the point of a refusal to recognize 
and face facts. The facts set forth above show beyond question that 
there are elements of plain peril to the railroads in such an increase 
in freight rates as they propose at the present time. The chief dangers 
are (1) that at a time when transportation costs are of vital conse- 
quence to every industry it will stimulate new competitive forces already 
rapidly developing, (2) that it will alienate or impair the friendly 
feeling toward the railroads on the part of the people of the country 
which is essential to adequate legislation for their protection and the 
proper regulation of all forms of transportation in the public interest, 
and (3) that it will disturb business conditions and an already shell- 
shocked industry, and accelerate the tendency toward a localization 
of production. It should be borne in mind that traffic once lost to a 
competitive agency is far more difiicult to regain than it is to hold 
before it is lost. And it should also be noted that disturbance to industry 
would be caused, not only by the immediate increase in charges, but 
also by the slow process of inevitable readjustment to a lower level 
of rates which would be necessary in many instances and which the 
railroad executives themselves concede that they anticipate. 

We have often referred to the fact that we are not managers of the 
railroads and have taken the position that we ought not to inter- 
fere with those who are entrusted with management on matters which 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 29 

are not controlled by law but must be determined in the last analysis 
by wise administrative policy and judgment. That is still our view. 
But here reliance upon the judgment of the executives as to the revenue 
effect of an increase in rates is much weakened by their failure to 
adduce any substantial reasons for their judgment and the definite 
withholding of the best available information on this point in their 
possession, namely, the information of their traffic departments. The 
excuse that this would have prolonged the hearings unduly is not, in 
our judgment, an adequate answer. There are competent traffic officers 
in all the districts who represent the carriers collectively and could 
have been used as a means of concentrating and assembling this infor- 
mation. Not only did the carriers fail to present such witnesses, but 
in several instances they refused to produce traffic officers whom protes- 
tants wished to call to the stand for the purpose of proving their case 
In opposition. In addition we have the evidence gained by experience 
with numerous voluntary reductions which have been made, often 
helow maximum reasonable rates fixed by us. 

On the other hand we have a mass of definite and concrete evi- 
dence from the shippers on this point of revenue effect which stands 
in the record uncontradicted by anything other than general assertions. 
Five of our members heard this evidence, although none heard it all, 
and they had the opportunity of appraising the character and sincerity 
of the witnesses. In our opinion this evidence is entitled to great 
weight. 

We also have a mass of definite and concrete evidence from shippers 
in regard to the general industrial collapse and the condition of in- 
dividual industries. This evidence also stands uncontradicted and, as 
has already been indicated, it shows beyond dispute that the situation 
of the railroads with respect to earnings is paralleled throughout 
the industrial world, and that many particular industries are in much 
worse plight. This is especially true of agriculture, and preeminently 
true of the grain farmer. The present prostration of a large part 
of agriculture has seldom if ever been equalled in the history of the 
country. 

Upon the evidence, therefore, it is our conclusion that a 15 per cent 
increase in all freight rates and charges would increase revenues, if 
at all, only temporarily and that its ultimate effect, not very long 
postponed, would be to harm rather than help the railroads. It is 
similarly our conclusion that such an increase would raise the rates 
upon many kinds of traffic above a just and reasonable level. This latter 
conclusion applies particularly to the products of agriculture, including 
livestock. We are advised that the committee representing the co- 
operating State Commissions has reached the same conclusions. 

After making further reference to several decisions of the Commission, 
which had not at the time become effective and which when effective would 
mean increases in carriers' revenues, the decision further states: 

But at best a process of rate readjustment of the kind above de- 
scribed is slow, and in our judgment it will not fully meet the needs 
of the present situation. The further step which we are now about to 
propose is offered for the consideration of the railroad executives in 
the immediate emergency, and only as a temporary measure of re- 
lief. It is motivated by the thought that the distrust of railroad securi- 
ties is rapidly gaining such elements of panic that a slight charge on 
the traffic of the industries of the country best able to stand it may 
justifiably be imposed, through freight rates, for the purpose of in- 
creasing confidence and averting developments which might further 
disturb an already tremendously shaken financial situation, and to 
avoid impairment of an adequate system of transportation. 

This plan is outlined in the appendix. It is designed to avoid im- 
posing burdens on industry which can not reasonably be borne under 



30 ^. C. CoEPORATioN Commission 

present conditions, to limit the danger of diversion of traffic to other 
forms of transportation, and to disturb business conditions as little as 
possible by preserving, very generally, existing rate relations. There- 
fore certain commodities have been excluded from any increases and 
the increase has been tempered on others. The basis has been made as 
definite as possible in order to minimize disputes, and as simple as 
possible in order that the increased rates may be made effective 
speedily. The increase is in cents per 100 pounds or amounts per car, 
subject to a fixed percentage maximum limit. Except for very short 
hauls affected by this maximum, it is in uniform amounts, so far as- 
particular kinds of traffic are concerned. The abnormal conditions now 
existing distinguish the situation from that before us Increased Rates, 
1920 supra, wherein we discussed the respective merits of percentage 
and flat increases. We propose to limit the increase to a period ending 
March 31, 1933. Its continuation after that time will depend upon 
conditions then existing. 



The plan outlined in the appendix we estimate will produce between 
one hundred million and one hundred twenty-five million dollars in- 
creased revenue on the basis of present traffic if applied both State 
and interstate. This should cover deficiencies in interest on fixed 
interest obligations with a substantial balance left over. The above 
estimate does not include increases in revenue which should accrue to 
the carriers during the coming year from the outstanding orders of the 
commission which have been mentioned above. 

Many difficulties will have to be met in working out the details of a 
plan for the marshalling of the fund derived from the increase author- 
ized, and for the distribution of that fund in the first instance among 
the carriers who fail to earn their interest charges, in proportion to 
their deficiencies. We are convinced that these difficulties can be met. 
A plan to that end should be worked out by the carriers and submitted 
for our approval. 

After the opinion, as above, was delivered by the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, which opinion was, as before stated, participated in by represen- 
tives of Southern States Commissions, the matter was further considered 
by the same body of men, and the following represents its final opinion: 

In the original report in this proceeding, 178 I. C. C. 539, we found 
that carriers subject to the interstate commerce act should be authorized 
to make comparatively small increases in rates for the transportation 
of certain freight articles for the purpose of increasing their operat- 
ing revenues and thereby improving their credit and to enable them 
to maintain an adequate transportation system. An extensive investiga- 
tion made by us in the premises, in which hearings were held in 
different parts of the United States, established that, by reason of the 
present depression and the rapid development since the depression 
began of other transportation facilities with which the carriers have 
been and are in competition, the revenues had become depleted to such 
an extent as to threaten the ability of the carriers to continue to fur- 
nish such transportation services as the public needs and must have. 
The freight articles selected by us in this connection were those for the 
transportation of which we believed the rates could be somewhat in- 
creased without causing the trafl[ic to be transferred to other agencies 
of transportation and without bringing about an undue disturbance in 
business conditions or transgressing the bounds of maximum reasonable 
rates. 

However, we further found that these increases were justified only 
as a temporary, emergency measure, and primarily and principally to 
assist some of the carriers in connection with the payment of their 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 31 

fixed charges. We therefore stated that the increases, in the absence 
of action to the contrary taken by us, should expire on March 31, 1933, 
and that meanwhile the income therefrom should be kept separate 
from other operating income of the carriers, placed in a pool, and used 
in connection with the payment of fixed charges and for other purposes 
as described in our original report. In this connection, among other 
things, we said: 

"Some carriers have obligations that are already in default, some 
are now in receivership, and some derive less than 50 per cent of their 
revenue from freight transportation. Such carriers should neither con- 
tribute to, nor receive from, the fund created, and they should be al- 
lowed to retain the full amount of the revenue accruing to them from 
the increased rates. The applicants should set up the machinery for 
operating and should operate the plan. At the end of six months or 
other appropriate interval, any balance remaining in the fund so created 
should be distributed to the carriers in the proportions in which earn- 
ings accruing on their properties have contributed to it. 

"The increase provided for in the appendix will be conditional upon 
the submission by the carriers, on or before December 1, 1931, for our 
approval under the interstate commerce act, of such a plan as is above 
described for the division among them of the gross proceeds derived 
from the increase. The plan submitted should provide that the revenues 
received from such increases should be earmarked and should be used 
for the purposes and in the manner above provided, and not other- 
wise. The increases herein proposed should be accepted as an entirety. 
If, for competitive or other reasons, the carriers decrease any of the 
rates so increased, the amount of the decrease should be taken from 
the basic rates rather than from the earmarked increases provided herein. 
Upon such submission and approval, we shall grant the necessary 
authority under section 6 for filing the blanket supplements, and those 
will be permitted to take effect without suspension, subject to the 
proviso that we shall reserve discretion to require minor changes in 
the details thereof; and that the resulting rates will in all respects 
be subject to investigation and determination as to the lav/fulness 
of particular rates or schedules of rates, as provided by the act." 

Our original report was issued October 16, 1931, and thereafter the 
carriers filed in our office a petition, in which they alleged, in substance, 
that the pooling plan provided for by us could not as a particular 
matter be applied, and requested us to permit them to substitute there- 
for what has been referred to in this proceeding as a loaning plan, 
that is to say, they asked for permission to use the sums of money 
to be placed in a pool as aforesaid for the purpose of making loans, 
through an agency to be created by them, for the payment of fixed 
charges, etc., as had been described by us. They also asked us to 
make a few other comparatively unimportant changes in our original 
report. 

After due notice to interested parties they were heard by us in oral 
argument in connection with the matters covered by the petition, and 
at that hearing counsel for the carriers contended that the impractica- 
bility of putting in force the pooling plan outlined by us results 
principally from the lack of authority on the part of representatives 
of some of the carriers to treat sums of money received for transporta- 
tion services performed by such carriers as the property of other 
carriers and allow the latter to use those sums in paying their fixed 
charges. Pertinent language used by counsel for the carriers in this 
connection is: 

"Many of the directors of these railroad companies have been advised 
by their counsel that a vote to dispose of the earnings in question as a 
gratuity would, or might, render such directors personally liable to 
any objecting stockholder, and, in fact, there is substantial reason to 
apprehend that an effort to do so would at once be enjoined by stock- 



32 ^. C. Corporation Commission 

holders and the whole matter he thrown into court, with a consequent 
delay that would in itself defeat the Commission's purpose." 

Counsel for the carriers also pointed out that in connection with the 
subject matter of pooling, the only authority specifically conferred upon 
us is contained in section 5 (1), which reads: 

"Sec. 5 (1) That, except upon specific approval by order of the 
Commission as in this section provided, and except as provided in para- 
graph (16) of section 1 of this Act, it shall be unlawful for any coriimon 
carrier subject to this Act to enter into any contract, agreement, or 
combination with any other common carrier or carriers for the pooling 
of freights of different and competing railroads, or to divide between 
them the aggregate or net proceeds of the earnings of such railroads, 
or any portion thereof; and in any case of an agreement for the pooling 
of freights as aforesaid each day of its continuance shall be deemed 
a separate offense: Provided, That whenever the Commission is of 
opinion, after hearing upon application of any carrier or carriers 
engaged in the transportation of passengers or property subject to 
this Act, or upon its own initiative, that the division of their traffic 
or earnings, to the extent indicated by the Commission, will be in the 
interest of better service to the public, or economy in operation, and 
will not unduly restrain competition, the Commission shall have authority 
by order to approve and authorize, if assented to by all the carriers 
involved, such division of traffic or earnings, under such rules and 
regulations, and for such consideration as between such carriers and 
upon such terms and conditions, as shall be found by the Commission 
to be just and reasonable in the premises." 

Upon this subject, counsel for the carriers, among other things, said : 

"That paragraph contemplates a pooling, under certain conditions,, 
of the earnings of 'competing' carriers — of carriers which, for the 
purpose of economy, parcel out between them service which all might 
perform, and justify it by pooling and dividing among them the revenues 
derived from all the services so parceled out. On the other hand, the 
pool here is to be contributed to by all the rail carriers, whether 
competing or not, and is clearly not a pool of the earnings only of 
competing carriers or of carriers bearing the same or similar relation- 
ship to the service. It not being within that section, there is not 
authority in law for such a pool, and the question of its legality must 
be determined on general legal principles." 

In addition to making contentions as above stated, counsel for the 
carriers urged that use of the loaning plan will enable the carriers to 
accomplish the purposes we had in view when we provided for the use 
of the pooling plan, and at the same time enable the carriers to avoid 
the legal difficulties necessarily connected with the latter plan. Contrary 
views were expressed by counsel representing some of the shippers, but 
no such opposition was voiced by counsel representing any carrier sub- 
ject to the interstate commerce act. In this connection, it will be 
observed that the rates to be paid by shippers will be the same under 
either plan. 

We are not prepared to admit that the construction placed upon sec- 
tion 5 (1) of the act by counsel for the carriers is correct, but we 
realize that the language contained in that paragraph is not sufficiently 
definite to exclude differences in views concerning its meaning, and 
that for this reason the legal difficulties mentioned have at least some 
foundation upon which to rest. Also, we have no reason for treating 
otherwise than as made in good faith the representations on behalf of 
the carriers to the effect that they will use the sums of money, which 
are to be placed in a pool as hereinbefore stated, to accomplish the 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 33 

purposes described in our original report. It is further true that we 
are impressed by the absence, on behalf of any carrier, of opposition to 
the loaning plan mentioned. In addition to the above, we believe it to 
be pretty clearly indicated, by matters called to our attention in our 
oral argument and otherwise developed in the course of this proceeding, 
that an agreement to adopt and put in force the pooling plan provided 
for by us can not be obtained, and in the absence of such an agree- 
ment our plan could not be made effective, since, as above shown, we 
have no authority to require such pooling. 

For the reasons above set forth, and because we desire to act promptly 
in this proceeding, in accordance with the duties imposed and the 
authority conferred upon us by the interstate commerce act, and avoid 
delays which will be injurious to the general public including the car- 
riers, we hereby modify our original report to the extent of relieving 
the carriers from the necessity of complying with the pooling plan 
therein described. This will leave them free to apply in the premises 
their own loaning plan, but, since use of the latter plan will not be 
pooling, within the meaning of that term as used in section 5 (1) of 
the interstate commerce act, and because loans by and between common 
carriers, as such, have not been included within the jurisdiction con- 
ferred upon us by Congress, we neither approve nor disapprove either 
the loaning plan or the agency the carriers say they expect and intend 
to use in making that plan effective. However, we rely on them to 
apply the funds to be derived from the authorized increases in rates 
in aid of financially weak railroads in accordance with the purposes 
expressed in our original report and in the instant application pursuant 
thereto and the arguments thereon presented. 

We also hereby amend our original report to the extent of relieving 
the carriers from the restriction contained in language hereinbefore 
quoted which is as follows: 

". . . The increases herein proposed should be accepted as an en- 
tirety. If, for competitive or other reasons, the carriers decrease any 
of the rates so increased, the amount of the decrease should be taken 
from the basic rates rather than from the earmarked increases provided 
herein. . . ." 

Objection has been raised to the imposition of the so-called double 
increase where there are movements subject to the act separated by 
an intermediate movement not subject to the act. This applied par- 
ticularly to movements of ore and coal through lake and ocean ports. 
There are practical difficulties in the way of accomplishing this by 
general provisions such as are made in this report. Therefore ship- 
pers and carriers are left free to endeavor to work out this situation 
between themselves. 

In the appendix under the caption "Switching and Lighterage Charges" 
we authorized certain increases for switching only. The omission of 
lighterage and floatage charges from the increases so authorized was 
unintentional. The same increases for these charges as for switching 
are authorized in the revised appendix hereto. 

Because of certain practical difficulties that exist in determining dis- 
tances and in view of the smallness of the increases, we have concluded, 
upon more mature consideration, to authorize an increase of 2 cents in 
all less-than-carload rates. 

In the revised appendix hereto the articles originally made subject 
to increases of $3 and $6 per car have been made subject to increases 
in cents per 100 pounds or per ton, the assignment of the respective 
commodities to the respective lists having been made on an approximate- 
weight basis. 

The revised appendix also makes certain changes in the classification 
of commodities, the desirability of which has become apparent since our 
original report was issued. 



34 ^. C. Corporation Commission 

The North Carolina Corporation Commission is of the opinion, and so 
finds, that the conditions which called for and warranted the increases in 
interstate freight rates and charges, which have been authorized by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission in conjunction with representation from 
the several State Commissions of the United States, apply equally to intra- 
state freight rates and charges, as set forth in the opinion hereinbefore re- 
ferred to, dated October 16, 1931, as modified by supplementary report of 
December 5, 1931, and should be authorized by this Commission to apply to 
intrastate rates and charges within North Carolina. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the common carriers (not including Truck 
Lines) operating within the State of North Carolina be, and the same are 
hereby authorized to put in force and effect on intrastate traffic within North 
Carolina increased rates and charges as shown in Appendix "A," hereto 
attached, and made a part of this order, effective February 1, 1932, which 
increased rates and charges shall be subject to the Commission's usual rule 
of reviewal upon complaint of shippers, or the Commission's own motion 
at any time, and it is further provided that any complaining shipper applying 
for a hearing on or before January 15, 1932, will be accorded same and a 
date set therefor promptly. 

That these increases are authorized under the same circumstances and 
conditions as provided for in the order of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission in Ex Parte 103, as decided October 16, 1931, and supplementary 
order, dated December 5, 1931, and shall expire, as therein provided, on 
March 31, 1933, unless sooner revoked or extended by further order of this 
Commission. 

By order of the Commission: R, 0. Self, 

This 7th day of January, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7199. 



Appendix "A" 

Plan for Increasing Freight Rates 

In the tables which follow, the numbered generic descriptions of com- 
modities or commodity groups are those specified in the order of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission, November 22, 1927, In the Matter of 
Freight Commodity Statistics. Except as otherwise provided and except 
where prefixed by circled "1," they cover the specific items customarily 
included by the carriers in their reports to the commission under each 
numbered description. Where prefixed by circled "1," the designated descrip- 
tions appli^ only on the commodities specifically here named. 

List A 

On commodities, in carloads, except as otherwise noted, included under 
the following descriptions there shall be no increase: 

Description 
No. 

10 Wheat 

20 Corn. 

30 Oats. 

40 Barley and rye. 

41 Rice. 

42 Grain, n.o.s. 

50 Flour, wheat. 

51 Meal, corn. 

52 Flour and meal, edible, n.o.s., except cassava flour, sago flour, 

and tapioca flour. 

61 Mill products, n.o.s., except alfalfa meal. 

70 , Hay and alfalfa. 

71 Straw. 

90 Cotton in bales, any quantity. 

91 Cotton linters, noils, and regins. 
100 Cottonseed. 

120 Apples, fresh. 

122 Berries, fresh. 

124 Grapes, fresh. 

125 Peaches, fresh. 

127 Fruits, fresh, domestic, n.o.s. 

130 Potatoes, other than sweeL 

150 Beans and peas, dried. 

162 Flaxseed. 

163 Sugar beets. 

164 (1) Products of agriculture, n.o.s., as follows: Corn cobs, corn-cob 

meal; corn husks or shucks; corn stalks; flaxseed hulls. 

170 Horses, mules, ponies, and asses. 

180 Cattle and calves, single deck. 

181 Calves, double deck. 

190 Sheep and goats, single deck. 

191 Sheep and goats, double deck. 

200 Hogs, single deck. 

201 Hogs, double deck. 
400 Logs. 

402 Wood (fuel). 



36 ]^. C. Corporation Commission 

410 Ties, railroad. 

443 (1) Excelsior (wood), wood shavings, n.o.i.b.n., and sawdust. 

701 (1) Cotton waste, other than manufactured packing or wiping waste. 

List B 

On commodities, in carloads, included under the following numbered 
descriptions there may be an increase of 6 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds: 

Description 
No. 

290 Anthracite coal. 

300 Bituminous coal. 

310 Coke. 

320 Iron ore. 

330 Copper ore and concentrates. 

331 Lead ore and concentrates. 

332 Zinc ore and concentrates. 

333 Ores and concentrates, n.o.s. 

350 Gravel and sand (other than glass or molding). 

351 Stone, broken, ground, or crushed; coated sand; arid coated 

rock road-building material. 
392 (1) Products of mines, n.o.s., as follows: 

Borate rock. 

Bituminous rock. 

Bituminous asphalt rock. 

Iron pyrites. 

Limestone, crushed or ground. 

Dolomite. 

Earth or soil, n.o.i.b.n. 

Feldspar. 

Fluorspar. 

Fluxing stone. 

Canister rock. 

Glass sand. 

Crude gypsum. • 

Loam. 

Molding sand. 

Nickel matte. 

Ore residue. 

Slate, crushed, ground or scrap. 

Volcanic ash. 
420 Pulpwood. 

491 (1) Mill cinder and mill scale, iron or steel. 
692 Furnace slag. 

701 (1) Pyrites cinder, refuse, or dross. 
701 (1) Coal ashes and cinders. 
701 (1) Brickbats and brick dust. 

List C 

On commodities, in carloads, included under the following numbered 
descriptions there may be an increase of 12 cents per ton of 2,000 poiinds: 

Description 
No. 

352 Stone, rough, n.o.s. 

390 Phosphate rock, crude (ground or not ground). 

391 Sulphur (brimstone). 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 37 

392 (1) Products of mines, n.o.s. as follows: 

Bentonite. 

China clay. 

Ground flint. 

Fire clay. 

Gilsonite, 

Ground gypsum, not calcined. 

Kaolin. 

Barium sulphate, ground (barytes), not precipitated. 

Barium sulphate, ground (barytes), precipitated (blanc 
fixe). 

Magnesium sulphate, crude, or kiersite. 

Mica scrap or screenings. 

Pipe clay. 

Shale. 

Slate, not crushed, ground or scrap. 

Soapstone (talc) ground, dust, lump or rough slabs. 

Chalk, crude. 

Clay, n.o.i.b.n. 

Cobblestones. 

Flint pebbles. 

Marble chips. 
401 Posts, poles, and piling. 

430 Lumber (made of domestic or Canadian wood or Mexican pine 

only). 

430 Lath and shingles. 

431 Box, crate, and cooperage materials. 

432 Veneer and built-up wood, made wholly of domestic or Canadian 

wood or Mexican pine. 
443 (1) Products of forests, n.o.s., as follows: 
Acid wood. 
Barks — 

Black oak (stick). 

Cedar, shredded. 

Hickory, not ground or powdered. 

Redwood, shredded. 

Tanbark — Leaf (stick); ground, spent or not spent. 
Wood-charcoal briquettes. 
Brush, riprapping. 
Charcoal, wood. 
Chemical wood. 

Chips (shavings), brewers' or vinegar. 
Cigar-box wood. 
Cones, fir or pine. 
Cork dust (cork-bark refuse). 

Cork chips, shavings, virgin bark, waste, or fuse. 
Palm kernels. 
Pine needles. 
Shingle tow or shavings. 
490 Pig Iron. 

693 Scrap iron and scrap steel. 

List D 

On commodities, in carloads, except as otherwise noted, included under 
the following numbered and unnumbered descriptions there may be an in- 
crease of 1 cent per 100 pounds: 



38 ^N". C. Corporation Commission 

Description 
No. 

80 Tobacco leaf, unmanufactured, any quantity. 

101 Cottonseed meal and cake. 

110 Oranges and grapefruit. 

111 Lemons, limes, and citrus fruits, n.o.s. 
123 Cantaloupes and melons, n.o.s. 

126 Watermelons. 

140 Cabbage. 

141 Onions. 

142 Tomatoes. 

143 Vegetables, fresh, n.o.s. 

151 Fruits, dried or evaporated. 

152 Vegetables, dried, n.o.s. 

160 Vegetable-oil cake and meal, except cottonseed. 

161 (1) Peanuts, raw. 

164 (1) Products of agriculture, n.o.s., as follows: 

Alfalfa seed. 

Apple waste. 

Apricot kernels. 

Bagasse. 

Barley or grain skimmings, malthouse. 

Barley sprouts. 

Bean meal (ground beans), n.o.i.b.n. 

Beans, soya. 

Beet pulp or residue. 

Broom corn. 

Cane seed. 

Chufas. 

Clover seed. 

Cocoa-bean refuse (cocoa dust). 

Copra. 

Cowpeas. 

Cucumbers in tank cars. 

Fenugreek seed or meal. 

Fodder, n.o.i.b.n. 

Fruit pits or stones, n.o.i.b.n. 

Fruit peel, not candied or crystallized. 

Fruit pulp. 

Grains, spent, dry or wet. 

Grass seed. 

Hemp stalks. 

Kapok seed or kapok-seed meal. 

Malt, malted grain or malt sprouts. 

Meal, alfalfa, clover, peanut vine, or sorghum; or chopped 
alfalfa. 

Millet seed. 

Mustard seed. 

Pea meal. 

Peanut grits. 

Peanut hulls or chaff. 

Pomace, n.o.i.b.n. 

Rape seed or rape-seed meal. 

Sorghum seed or meal. 

Tomato refuse (from canneries). 

Tobacco stems, ground or unground. 

Unmanufactured tobacco cuttings, siftings, scraps or sweep- 
ings. 

Velvet beans or velvet-bean meal. 
353 Stone, finished, n.o.s. 

360 Petroleum, crude. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 39 

370 Asphalt (natural, by-product, or petroleum). 

440 Rosin. 

441 Turpentine. 
443 (1) Pine tar. 

450 Petroleum oils, refined, and all other gasolines. 

451 Fuel, road, and petroleum residual oils, n.o.s. 

452 Lubricating oils and greases. 

453 Petroleum products, n.o.s. 

540 Cement, natural or Portland (building). 

550 Brick, common. 

551 Brick, n.o.s., and building tile. 

552 Artificial stone, n.o.s. 

560 Lime, common (quick or slacked). 

630 Ice. 

640 Fertilizers, n.o.s. 

697 Building woodwork (millwork). 

701 (1) Soapstone forms or slabs, including fire box or furnace linings. 

701 (1) Tar, and pitch, except brewers' and montan. 

701 (1) Feed, animal or poultry, n.o.i.b.n., and not including biscuits, 
dog (dog cakes). 

On all other commodities, including all less-than-carload freight, there 
may be an increase of 2 cents per 100 pounds. 

The increases set forth above are subject to the following provisos: 

1. In no event shall the increase levied on any shipment be in excess 
of 10 per cent of the charges which would be assessed in the absence of 
the increase. 

2. Where rates are stated in schedules in dollars per car the respective 
increases shall be $7.50 per car if the increase, as shown above, is 1 cent 
per 100 pounds; $10 per car if such increase is 2 cents 100 pounds, $3 per 
car if such increase is 6 cents per ton; and $5 per car if such increase is 
12 cents per ton. 

3. Where through shipments move under combination rates subject to 
the interstate commerce act, but one increase may be applied on such 
shipments. This proviso does not apply where there are two movements 
subject to the act separated by an intermediate movement not subject to 
the act. Where shipments move under transit on a basis which applies 
a through rate (either with or without a transit or out-of-line charge) the 
increase or surcharge should be applied but once. 

Where the minimum weights are different in connection with the separate 
factors in combination through rates, the increase shall be based on the 
highest minimum, unless a lower total results from applying the above 
authorized increases separately to each factor or any aggregation of factors, 
subject to the minimums attaching thereto. 

Weights. — The increases authorized shall apply to the weight on which 
the charges are based. 

Mixed Carloads. — Mixed carload shipments shall be subject to the highest 
surcharge provided for any article in the carload, except where a lower 
total results by surcharging a portion of the shipment as less than a carload 
and the remainder as a carload. 

Switching, Floatage, and Lighterage Charges. — All switching, floatage, and 
lighterage charges collected from shippers or receivers may be increased 10 
per cent, EXCEPT no increase shall apply on articles in List A. 



40 I^. C. Corporation Commission 

Joint Rates to and From Foreign Countries. — It is not intended to in- 
crease the proportions of joint through rates to or from points in foreign 
countries accruing for the transportation in such foreign countries; the 
proportions of such rates accruing within the United States may be increased 
to the extent herein approved for domestic rates. 

Carriers hy Water. — Where rates of water carriers are subject to the 
act, covering transportation either wholly by water or partly by water 
and partly by railroad, the increases herein suggested may in like manner 
be applied to such rates. 

Fourth- Section Depa/rtures. — If the adoption of the different rates of in- 
crease herein suggested results in any violation of the aggregate-of-inter- 
mediates or long-and-short-haul provision of section 4 (1) of the act, the 
carriers should take prompt steps to remove the violation or promptly 
make application for relief. 

Rates Prescribed and not yet Effective. — It is contemplated that the 
increases herein set forth will be superimposed upon the rates now in 
effect, whether established by order of the commission or the voluntary 
act of the carriers (including rates held in effect by reason of investigation 
and suspension orders), and also upon rates prescribed by outstanding 
orders of the commission not yet in effect, when and as the rates therein 
prescribed become effective, subject to the exceptions noted above. 

Docket No. 7199. 

APPLICATION OF COMMON CARRIERS (EXCEPT TRUCK LINES) TO 
MAKE EFFECTIVE ON INTRASTATE TRAFFIC INCREASED; 
FREIGHT RATES AND CHARGES AS PER DECISIONS OF THE 
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION, DATED OCTOBER 16, AND 
DECEMBER 5, 1931, RESPECTIVELY, COMMONLY KNOWN AS 15 
PER CENT RATE INCREASE, (EX PARTE 103). 

Supplemental Order 
In our original order, as above, dated January 7, 1932, we provided 
that increased rates and charges, as shown in Appendix "A" should be 
made effective February 1, 1932, and shall be subject to the Commission's 
usual rule of reviewal upon complaint, or upon the Commission's own motion 
at any time, and that any complaining shipper should apply to the Com- 
mission on or before January 15, 1932, otherwise the increased rates and 
charges would go into effect as provided. As a result of the above pro- 
visions of the original order, several complaints have been filed with the 
Commission seeking modification or objecting to the entire increase in 
rates and charges. One of these complaints states conditions in industry 
are worse than when the Interstate Commerce Commission heard the case 
and for this reason the protest is filed as was done before the Interstate 
Commerce Commission at its hearing. Another complainant makes the 
general protest against any additional charges on fertilizer and fertilizer 
materials; another states the increased rates and charges should not have 
been allowed from the standpoint of industry, but "We need and must 
have the railroads as carriers of commerce for the Nation," and for that 
reason he does not object; other complainants refer to individual items. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 41 

These matters having been fully presented to the Commission in writing, 
it is of the opinion, and so finds that the increased emergency charges 
should not have been authorized for intrastate application on the following 
articles, carload: 

Coal. 

Wood, acid. 
Wood, chemical. 
Wood, pulp. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the common carriers (not including truck 
lines) operating within the State of North Carolina be, and the same are 
hereby ordered and directed to amend our Order of January 7, cancelling 
authority to include the following items, in carloads, namely: Coal; Wood, 
acid; Wood, chemical; Wood, pulp; that these items are exempted from 
the additional emergency charges, and such emergency charges shall not be 
added on the above commodities, effective February 1, 1932. 

By direction of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 18th day of January, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7199. 

COMPLAINT OF WILMINGTON TRAFFIC ASSOCIATION AGAINST AP- 
PLICATION OF EMERGENCY CHARGES (AS PER EX PARTE 103) 
ON FERTILIZER AND FERTILIZER MATERIALS, INTRASTATE, IN 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

Second Supplemental Order 

This complaint sets forth discrimination in freight charges on fertilizer 
and fertilizer materials from Wilmington to border destinations within 
the State located along the State Line border of South Carolina and the 
State Line border of Virginia. 

It appears the emergency charges (Ex Parte 103) applicable" on fertilizer 
and fertilizer materials (Group 640) of 20 cents per ton carload and 40 
cents per ton less than carload, are not applied within the State of Virginia 
or within the State of South Carolina. 

Upon receipt of complaint the matter was handled with the State Com- 
missions of Virginia and South Carolina, both of which indicate in their 
replies that no change on their part is in contemplation. 

The subject was also handled with the carriers who replied they cannot 
afford to waive the emergency charges in any particular and suggest a 
complaint be filed before the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

This Commission is of the opinion and so finds it is unfair and unjust 
to intrastate shippers in North Carolina that these emergency charges 
should be applied on fertilizer and fertilizer materials to border points 
along the state lines of Virginia and South Carolina and that this dis- 
criminatory situation can be overcome in no other reasonable way than 
by exempting these commodities from the intrastate emergency charges in 
North Carolina. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That our Supplemental Order of January 18, 
1932, exempting Coal, Acid Wood, Chemical Wood and Pulpwood from the 
emergency charges, be amended to include fertilizer and fertilizer materials 



42 K. C. Corporation Commission 

(Group 640) carload and less than carload, and that said commodities 
be exempted from the emergency charges. 

It is Further Ordered, That common carriers by rail operating within 
the State be, and they are hereby directed, to make this change not later 
than April 20, 1932. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 12th day of April, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7199. 

WILMINGTON TRAFFIC ASSOCIATION, INCORPORATED v. ATLANTIC 
AND YADKIN RAILWAY COMPANY, ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAIL- 
ROAD COMPANY, CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY COM- 
PANY, CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY, ATLANTIC 
COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY AND LOUISVILLE AND NASH- 
VILLE RAILROAD COMPANY (LESSEES), HIGH POINT, RANDLE- 
MAN, ASHEBORO AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY, NORFOLK 
AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY, NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAIL- 
ROAD COMPANY, SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY COMPANY, SOUTH- 
ERN RAILWAY COMPANY, WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILWAY 
COMPANY, YADKIN RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Order 
Wilmington Traffic Association, Inc., by complaint, dated May 16, 1930, 
alleges that rates on extracts and tanning materials, carload, from Wil- 
mington, N. C, to consuming or tannery points in Western North Carolina 
are unreasonable and discriminatory when compared with rates on like 
commodities from Norfolk, Va., to same points of destination, and set up as 
an example, in part, the following comparisons: 

Norfolk, Va. Wilmington, N. C. 

To • Miles Rate Miles Rate 

Andrews, N. C 527 41i^ 437 59 

Asheville, N. C 419 40i^ 329 52 

Elkin, N. C 310 39i^ 262 47 

Hazlewood, N. C 449 4I1/2 359 54 

Old Fort, N. C 389 40i^ 299 49 

It is pointed out that the rates from Norfolk are commodity rates, whereas, 
the rates from Wilmington are class rates, and complainant seeks to have 
reasonable commodity rates established from Wilmington in keeping, dis- 
tance considered, with present rates from Norfolk. 

Hearing in this matter was held at the office of the Commission, in 
Raleigh, August 19, 1930. Complainant introduced exhibits to show present 
distances and rates from both Norfolk and Wilmington to these tannery 
points, all of which points are located upon the Southern Railway lines 
in Western North Carolina, and set up the contention that Wilmington is 
entitled to a rate position on these commodities in line, distance considered, 
with rates from Norfolk measured by applying from Wilmington average 
rates based upon 28 per cent of 1st class rates, under general Southern 
Class Rate Scale, known as K-2 scale, which is the average percentage the 
present commodity rates from Norfolk bear to the 1st class rates, which 
1st class rates are now upon basis of the so-called K-2 scale, the destina- 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 



43 



tion points to be grouped in the same manner as they are now grouped 
from Norfolk. 

Further testimony was introduced tending to show there are commodity 
rates in effect on tanning materials from Canton, N. C, to points in Virginia 
and Georgia, which are in every case less than 28 per cent of 1st class. To 
be exact, an average of 23.4 per cent of 1st class to the 13 points of destination 
shown in the exhibit. 

The carriers took the general position that it is conceded by all con- 
cerned that commodity rates should be established from Wilmington, such 
rates, however, should be on an exact parity with Norfolk; that the present 
Norfolk rates were made arbitrarily 3i^ cents per 100 pounds less than 
Baltimore without reference to distance and that distance should be dis- 
regarded from Wilmington and the rates arbitrarily made the same as 
from Norfolk. There are important exceptions to this, in that the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad and Seaboard Air Line Railway, which are the initial 
lines at Wilmington, while standing generally upon the principle of exact 
port equalization, these two carriers, nevertheless, proposed certain rates 
in this case based upon a mileage scale especially constructed for the pur- 
pose, which if applied will result in rates from Wilmington some less than 
Norfolk and which it claimed would make the rates from Wilmington con- 
sistent with the group rates from Norfolk. 

The two proposals would result as follows: 





To 


Norfolk 


Wilmington 




Average Mi. 


Rate 


Average Mi. 


Rate 




474 
406 
319 


41H 
49H 
39H 


370 
319 
271 


38 




36 




34 







Carriers' Proposal 



Andrews 

Brevard 

Hazlewood 

Rosman 

Sylva 

Asheville 

Boswell 

Emma 

Morganton 

Old Fort 

Sulphur Springs . 
Westall 

Elkin 

North Wilkesboro 




41H 

393^ 

40 

39H 

40H' 

39H 

39)4 

39H 

38 

38V^ 

39^ 

39>^ 



3S14 



44 ^N". C. Corporation Commission 

It will be observed that complainant's proposal would result in dif- 
ferences of ZV2 in Andrews group to 5i^ in Elkin group in favor of Wilming- 
ton, while carriers' proposal ranges in differences from "0" at Andrews to 
2l^ at Morganton. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds, that the fact that the 
current rates on tanning extracts from Norfolk, Va., to these tannery points 
were made arbitrarily lower than rates from Baltimore is no sound reason 
why the same rates would be reasonable to apply from Wilmington, which 
point is located upon an average distance of 89 miles nearer points of destina- 
tion than is Norfolk. 

The Commisison further finds that inasmuch as the Norfolk rates are 
arbitrarily upon group basis without regard to distance, it follows that it 
will be both reasonable and logical to make Wilmington rates to similar 
groups arbitrarily something less than rates from Norfolk. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the carriers named above be, and they 
are hereby ordered and directed to put in force on or before September 10, 

1930, on tanning extracts and tanning materials, as described in Item 720, 
of Agent Cottrell's I. C. C. 727, and Item 4472, Agent Speiden's I. C. C. 
1367, rates from Wilmington, N. C, to points of destination, as shown in 
above named tariffs, in Western North Carolina to which rates are pub- 
lished from Norfolk made 2i^ cents per 100 pounds less than current rates 
from Norfolk, Va. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 22d day of August, 1930. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6925. 

WILMINGTON TRAFFIC ASSOCIATION, INCORPORATED v. ATLANTIC 
AND YADKIN RAILWAY COMPANY, ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAIL- 
ROAD COMPANY, CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY, 
(ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY AND LOUISVILLE 
AND NASHVILLE' RAILROAD COMPANY, LESSEES), HIGH POINT, 
RANDLEMAN, ASHEBORO AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY, 
NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY, NORFOLK SOUTH- 
ERN RAILROAD COMPANY, SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY COM- 
PANY, SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY, WINSTON-SALEM SOUTH- 
BOUND RAILWAY COMPANY, YADKIN RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Order 

Comes now Chairman J. E. Tilford of the Southern Fright Association, 
and J. A, Streyer, General Traffic Manager of the American Short Line 
Railroad Association, in joint application, dated November 22, 1930, file 
70-120, and renewed in letter of Chairman Tilford, dated November 17, 

1931, seeking revision of rates on green, salted hides, carload, from Wil- 
mington, N. C, to Western North Carolina points, covered by order of 
the Commission, as above, dated March 25, 1930, in order, as the application 
states, that rates made on basis of 30 per cent of first class (K-2 scale) 
may be made to apply on green, salted hides, carload, from and to above 
points as this basis is now applicable throughout other intrastate territory 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 45 

within the State. Upon submission of copy of the application of Chair- 
man Tilford to Traffic Manager Boyd of the Wilmington Traffic Association, 
the Commission is advised, under date of December 8, 1931, Boyd's file 
139, to the effect that inasmuch as green, salted hides, carload, have now 
been placed upon basis of 30 per cent of first class, there is no objection to 
granting the application of the carriers at this time. 

It is Theeefoke Ordeeed, That order of the Commission, dated March 25, 
1930, promulgating basis for specific commodity rates on green, salted hides, 
carload, from Wilmington, N. C, to Western North Carolina tannery points, 
as named in the order, is hereby withdrawn and cancelled. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 11th day of December, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7181. 

IN RE: PETITION OF WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILWAY COM- 
PANY FOR PERMISSION TO DISCONTINUE THE OPERATION OF 
ALL PASSENGER SERVICE. 

Oedee 

The petition in the above-entitled cause came on for hearing on July 28, 
1932. After a careful consideration of the evidence, the Commission finds 
the following facts: 

1. That the convenience and necessity of the traveling public does 
not require the running of passenger trains on the railroad of petitioner. 

2. That petitioner is losing very nearly $20,000 a year in the operation 
of its passenger trains and that tbis loss does not include taxes, main- 
tenance or any other expense except that incurred in the actual opera- 
tion of the trains. 

3. That the petitioner is losing heavily each year in the operation 
of its road both for freight and passenger business. 

These facts on their face demand that we give petitioner the relief de- 
manded in the petition, but, according to our construction of the law, we 
are unable to do so. It appears to be elemental that no railroad corpora- 
tion can divest itself of the exercise of its functions granted to it by its 
charter nor put itself in such position that it can not exercise them. Again 
Section 3481 of the Consolidated Statutes provides that a railroad com- 
pany "shall run at least one passenger train in each direction over its 
road on every day except Sunday." It appears to us that it is the clear 
intention of the Legislature to compel railroads to give passenger service 
at least once a day to each station on its line. 

The Commission, however, holds, and so orders, that petitioner to take 
care of the limited amount of passenger travel on its road may run a mixed 
train each way between Winston-Salem and Wadesboro. 

The Commissioner further holds, and so orders, that petitioner may dis- 
continue passenger service between Winston-Salem and Wadesboro on 
Sundays. 

The Commission holds, and so orders, that petitioner may be, and is 
hereby, exempted from the provisions of Section 2619, so far as mixed 
trains are concerned, requiring separate accommodations for different races. 



46 iN". C. Corporation Commission 

The Commisison holds, and so orders, that petitioner may enter into 
contract with the Railway Express Agency, Incorporated, to operate trucks 
between Winston-Salem and Wadesboro, North Carolina, solely for the 
purpose of enabling the Railway Express Agency to handle express business 
of the Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company, said express trucks 
to follow the line of the Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company as 
nearly as practicable. 

The Commission holds, and so orders, that the petitioner itself or through 
its agents may operate trucks between Winston-Salem, L-exington, and High 
Point, North Carolina, to facilitate the handling of the joint express business 
of the Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company and the High Point, 
Thomasville and Denton Railroad Company. 

The Commission holds, and so orders, that the said Railway Express 
Agency, Incorporated, under this order shall handle express only to and from 
stations of the Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company and the High 
Point, Thomasville and Denton Railroad Company. 

In view of the legal propositions above set forth, petitioner's petition 
to be allowed to discontinue passenger service is hereby denied; but, that 
part of its supplemental petition, as above granted, as herein set forth, is 
allowed. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 28th day of July, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7271. 

IN RE: INTRASTATE RATES ON COTTON AND KNITTING FACTORY 
PRODUCTS BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Supplement 13, at Page 4, Agent Cottrell's I. C. C. No. 767, (North Caro- 
lina Intrastate Tariff), effective September 2, 1930, carload rates are pub- 
lished on cotton and knitting factory products, as per Description A-65, 
shown therein, from Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, Salisbury and Winston- 
Salem to destinations in North Carolina, as named in Item 22, Page 3, of 
the same supplement. 

By a foot note reference, less carload rates from and to the same points 
are cancelled and class rates are to apply. 

The supplement states this action is in compliance with order of the 
Interstate Commerce Commisison in Docket 16321, dated June 9, 1930. 

By Supplement J, to the same tariff, the effective date of these rates is 
postponed to November 1, 1930, and the rates have, therefore, become ef- 
fective. The order of the Interstate Commerce Commission, upon which 
the above action of the carriers is based, simply directed the carriers to 
remove certain discriminations found to exist against Norfolk, Va., and 
this Commission is of the opinion, and so finds, that the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission did not intend for its order to be complied with, in 
the manner herein described, by increasing North Carolina intrastate rates, 
and which action at the same time has the effect of creating, within the 
State, almost numberless discriminations on intrastate traffic that are wholly 
unreasonable. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 47 

It is Thekefore Ordered, That Supplement No. 13, and Supplement J, of 
Agent J. J. Cottrell's I. C. C. No. 767, (North Carolina Intrastate Tariff) 
be, and the same are hereby cancelled as to Item 22, Page 3, and commodities 
covered by Commodity Description No. A-65, Page 4, of Supplement 13, 
and that rates on these commodities will not apply to intrastate traffic 
moving wholly between points within the State. That rates shown in the 
original tariff, as above, shall be continued in effect on intrastate traffic. 

It is Further Ordered, That this order shall be in force from and after 
November 1, 1930. 

By order of the Commission: R- O- Self, 

This 19th day of November, 1930. Clerk, 

Docket No. 6974, 

PETITION OF RAIL CARRIERS OF THE STATE THROUGH CHAIRMAN 
TILFORD OF SOUTHERN FREIGHT ASSOCIATION AND J. A 
STREYER FOR AMERICAN SHORT LINE ASSOCIATION, SEEKING 
AUTHORITY TO REVISE INTRASTATE FREIGHT RATES ON 
PETROLEUM AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS WITHIN THE STATE OP 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Appearances for Petitioners 
H. L. Walker, Commerce Counsel for Southern Railway; W. W. Wolford, 
Assistant Commerce Agent for Southern Railway; G. R. Ward, Commerce 
Agent for Seaboard Air Line Railway (L. R. Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, 
Receivers) ; R. G. Hodgkin, Assistant Freight Traffic Manager and H. V. 
Borjes, his assistant, for Atlantic Coast Line Railroad; J. P. Blanton, for 
American Short Line Railroad Association. 

Appearances for Respondents 

John S. Burchmore for Standard Oil Company of New Jersey; E. D. 
Sheffe, Traffic Department, Standard Oil Company of New Jersey; W. L. 
Macatee for The Texas Company. 

This petition is dated April 11, 1931 and amended May 9, 1931, and seeks 
authority to cancel all existing intrastate carload and less than carload 
commodity rates and classification exceptions on petroleum and petroleum 
products between points within the State of North Carolina and make 
effective simultaneously revised rates on mileage scale as set forth in Exhibit 
No. 1, accompanying the application, and arbitraries set forth in Exhibit 
No. 2, also accompanying the application, as maximum rates to be applied 
in future to intrastate traffic within North Carolina. 

Hearing was held at Raleigh, N. C, Monday, February 15, 1932. 

This proposed revision of petroleum rates is a result of a general 
investigation by the Interstate Commerce Commission involving rates on 
petroleum and petroleum products interstate throughout the country on 
interstate traffic as covered by its Docket 17000, Part 4, (171 I. C. C. 286). 
The general investigation was conducted under an effective cooperative plan 
with various state commissions and the Southern States East of the Missis- 
sippi River had representation in a cooperative way. The investigation was 



48 ]^. C. Corporation Commission 

begun by the Interstate Commerce Commission in 1926 as a result of 
several complaints which were consolidated and the record closed in 1927, 
the decision being rendered January 5, 1931. The effective date of the inter- 
state order was postponed from time to time, the rates finally becoming 
effective in Southern Territory March 15, 1932. 

It appears the interstate decision was highly unsatisfactory to the despond- 
ents in this case, being, as stated by counsel, a double-barrel decision, 
(1) a mileage scale was prescribed to apply generally throughout South- 
eastern Territory which scale was not percentagely related to class rates 
but actually works out about 32 per cent of first class in Southern Ter- 
ritory; (2) specific rates were prescribed from important producing oil 
fields in Southwest Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas, into Southeastern Ter- 
ritory which were likewise not purposely related to class rates, but, it is 
stated, will range from 19 per cent to 25 per cent of the first class rates. 
It is these latter rates which the respondents feel are prejudicial, since these 
rates are lower, mile for mile, than is the mileage scale to apply wholly 
within the South east of the Mississippi River. The oil interests repeatedly 
petitioned the Interstate Commerce Commission for reopening and rehearing, 
alleging the prescribed rates are unreasonably high and were based upon a 
record made when conditions were greatly different from those now exist- 
ing, which it was alleged renders the prescribed rates unreasonable to be 
applied at this time and as above stated prejudicial to the extent that rates 
are prescribed from Southwestern Territory into Southeastern Territory 
on a lower level than the mileage scale within the South. These petitions 
were denied by the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

The present rates on petroleum and its products, carload, within North 
Carolina were the regular sixth class rates made effective in 1914 and 
which rates have since received two increases authorized by vthe Federal 
Authorities during the war period and one reduction of 10 per cent, ef- 
fective July 1, 1922. The less than carload rates are regular class rates 
which were, in recent orders, revised to the regular southern interstate 
level. 

The proposed rates as compared with present rates are, for single lines, 
higher for 5 miles, lower from 10 to 30 miles, the same for 35 miles, higher 
from 45 to 55 miles, the same for 65 miles and higher throughout the re- 
mainder of the scale. Comparing the joint rates the scale is lower up to 
90 miles and higher than the remainder of the scale. 

The respondents in this case have bulk tank stations at the port of 
Wilmington to which refined oil is brought in tank steamers and shipped 
thence by rail to the interior in tank cars. The contention is made by 
respondents that 25 per cent of first class would produce a reasonable scale 
for application on petroleum and petroleum products and that due to other 
forms of transportation higher rates v/ill likely divert the traffic from the 
rail lines. 

The Commission is of the opinion and so finds that the scale of rates 
for both single and joint line application as provided in Circular No. 351 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 49 

attached hereto and made a part of this order, will be reasonable to apply- 
on petroleum and petroleum products within the State of North Carolina 
and that to this scale may be added an arbitrary of six (6) cents per 100 
pounds for short or weak lines which should accrue solely to those lines, 
and in determining rates over routes made up in whole or in part of the 
lines of the Norfolk Southern, an arbitrary equal to twenty (20) per cent 
of the scale prescribed for trunk lines may be added for that portion of the 
haul over the Norfolk Southern, subject to a maximum arbitrary of six (6) 
cents per 100 pounds, which arbitrary shall accrue solely to the Norfolk 
Southern. This scale of rates and arbitraries were found reasonable by 
the Interstate Commerce Commission to apply generally within the South 
east of the Mississippi River. 

The Commission is further of the opinion and so finds that the rates on 
fuel oil and other low-grade oils in carloads, shall not exceed eighty (80) 
per cent of the rates herein prescribed on high grade oils from and to the 
same points, fractions of a cent to be resolved to the nearest half cent. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That common carriers by rail within the State 
be and they are hereby authorized to make effective within the State 
rates on petroleum and petroleum products as set out in Circular No. 351 
which is attached hereto and made a part of this order, effective May 1, 
1932. 

It is Further Ordered, That the rates authorized herein shall not be 
subject to the emergency rates authorized by the Commission's order dated 
January 7, 1932, and supplemental order dated January 18, 1932. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 7th day of April, 1932. Clerk. 



Item 1. 



MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES 



ON 



PETROLEUM AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS, INCLUDING COMPOUND 

OILS OR GREASES HAVING A PETROLEUM BASE, AND 

BLENDED GASOLINES 

(See Notes 1, 2 and 3, page 2) 



Absorption oil 
Belt oil 
Benzine 
Blended Gasolines 

(See Note 3) 
Compression oil 
Cordage oil 
Crude oil (see note 4) 
Floor oil 

Fuel oil (see note 4) 
Gas oil (see note 4) 



Gasoline, casing head 

Gasoline, N. O. I. B. N. 
in Southern Classi- 
fication 

Miners' oil stock 

Harness oil 

Leather oil 

Miners' oil 

Naphtha 

Naphtha distillate 

Neatsfoot oil 



Putty oil 

Refined oil distillate 

Refined oil, illuminat- 
ing, or burning 

Soap oil 

Tanners oil 

Tobacco oil 

Transformer oil 

Wool oil, or Oil, N. O. 
I. B. N. in Southern 
Classification. 



50 ]Sr. C. CoRPOKATioN Commission 

In glass or earthenware, packed in barrels or boxes; in metal cans» 
partially or completely jacketed; in metal cans in boxes or in bulk in 
barrels; carload, minimum weight 26,000 pounds, subject to Rule 34 of 
Southern Classification. In tank cars, carload, estimated weight per gallon 
Q.Q pounds, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Benzol (benzene) in metal cans in boxes or in bulk in barrels, carload, 
minimum weight 30,000 pounds. In tank cars, carload, subject to Rule 35 
of Southern Classification. 

Benzol-mixed-with-gasoline (mixture of benzol and gasoline) in iron or 
steel drums and iron or steel barrels, minimum carload weight 30,000 
pounds. In tank cars, carload, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Gas, liquefied petroleum, having a vapor pressure exceeding 40 pounds per 
square inch, absolute (Reid method), at 100 degrees F., March to October, 
inclusive, or exceeding 45 pounds per square inch, absolute (Reid method), 
at 100 degrees P., November to February, inclusive, carloads, in tank cars 
of the type prescribed by the Interstate Commerce Commission (see B. W. 
Dunn Tariff 2, I. C. C. 2), subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification, 
and an estimated weight of 6.6 pounds per gallon. 

Gas, liquefied petroleum, having a vapor pressure exceeding 40 pounds per 
square inch, absolute (Reid method) at 100 degrees F., March to October, 
inclusive, or exceeding 45 pounds per square inch, absolute (Reid method) 
at 100 degrees F., November to February, inclusive, in steel cylinders com- 
plying with the Interstate Commerce Commission's! shipping eonjtainer 
specifications (see B. W. Dunn Tariff 2, I. C. C. 2), carloads, minimum 
weight 60,000 pounds. 

Gas, liquefied petroleum, with gas pressure not over 23 pounds per 
square inch at 70 degrees F., nor over 70 pounds per square inch at 130 
degrees F., in steel drums of the type prescribed by the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission (see B. W. Dunn Tariff 2, L C. C. 2), carloads, minimum 
weight 60,000 pounds. 

Grease axle; Grease, N. O. I. B. N., in Southern Classification: In metal 
cans in crates; in wooden pails or tubs; in kits or iron or steel pails or in 
barrels or boxes; carload, minimum weight 30,000 pounds. In tank cars, 
carload, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Grease, lubricating, other than axle grease: In metal tubes in barrels 
or boxes; in metal cans in crates; in wooden pails or tubs; in kits or iron 
or steel pails or in barrels or boxes; carload, minimum weight 30,000 
pounds. In tank cars, carload, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Grease, petroleum lubricating, combined with wool waste, in straight car- 
loads or in mixed carloads with grease petroleum lubricating, minimum 
weight 30,000 lbs. 

Lubricating oil, in glass or earthenware, packed in barrels or boxes, in 
metal cans, partially or completely jacketed; in metal cans in crates or 
boxes or in bulk in barrels; carload, minimum weight 26,000 pounds, sub- 
ject to Rule 34 of Southern Classification. In tank cars, carload, estimated 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 51 

weight per gallon 6.6 pounds, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Paraffine wax, in bags, barrels or boxes or in bulk; carload, minimum 
weight 30,000 pounds. In tank cars, carload, subject to Rule 35 of Southern 
Classification. 

Petrolatum or petrolatum preparations, including cosmoline, densoline, 
litholine, petroleum jelly, petrolina or vaseline (see Note 2 below) : In glass 
or earthenware, packed in barrels or boxes; in metal tubes in barrels or 
boxes; in metal cans in barrels, boxes or crates; in wooden pails or tubs; 
in kits or iron or steel pails or in bulk in barrels; carload, minimum weight 
30,000 pounds. In tank cars, carload, subject to Rule 35 of Southern 
Classification. 

Petroleum or petroleum products, including compounded oils or greases 
having a petroleum base (see Notes 1 and 2 below) shipped in storage 
tanks: When the contents of storage tank equal or exceed one-third (1-3) 
of tank's capacity in gallons, the rating provided for oil of the same kind 
in barrels shall apply, actual weight of the oil and tank to be charged for, 
carload, minimum weight 30,000 pounds, subject to Rule 34 of Southern 
Classification. When the contents do not equal one-third (1-3) of tank's 
capacity, the shipment will be treated as a combination article (see Rule 
18 of Southern Classification). 

Wax, N. 0. I. B. N., in Southern Classification, in bags, barrels or boxes; 
carload, minimum weight 30,000 pounds: In tank cars, carload, subject to 
Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Wax tailings, in barrels, carload, minimum weight 30,000 pounds. In tank 
cars, carload, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Note 1. The term "having a petroleum base," as used in this item, 
means the principal ingredient of such compounded oils or greases must 
be petroleum. 

Note 2. Petroleum oil, N. O. I. B. N. in Southern Classification, petro- 
latum or petrolatum preparations, prepared and represented as a remedy, 
medicine or lubricant for the human body, will be rated under the specifi- 
cation for medicines, N. 0. I. B. N. in Southern Classification. 

Note 3. The term "blended gasolines" as used in this item covers motor 
fuels containing fifty per cent or more of gasoline. 

Note 4. Applies only in mixed carloads with one or more articles named 
in this item. For rates on crude, fuel and gas oils, see Item 2. 

Item 2. 

Rates on Crude petroleum oil, fuel oil (petroleum) and gas oil (pe- 
troleum), in bulk in barrels, straight or mixed carloads, minimum weight 
40,000 pounds, or in tank cars, carload, estimated weight per gallon 7.4 
pounds, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification, shall be 80 per cent 
of the rates shown in Item 1. Fractions of three-fourths of a cent, or over, 
shall be computed as one cent and fractions less than three-fourths, but not 
less than one-fourth of a cent, shall be computed as half cent. Fractions 
of less than one-fourth of a cent, shall be dropped. 



52 



]Sr. C. Corporation Commission 



RATES ON PETROLEUM AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS, C. L., AS 
DESCRIBED IN ITEM I. 

Rates are in cents per hundred pounds 

Scale "A". 



Miles 


Rate 


Miles 


Rate 




10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

;? 

18 
18 
19 
20 
20 
21 
22 
22 
23 
24 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
28 
29 
30 
31 
31 


181 through 190. 


32 


6 through 10 


191 through 200 


33 


11 through 15 


201 through 210 


33 


16 through 20 


211 through 220 


34 


21 through 25 . ._. 


221 through 230 


34 


26 through 30 


231 through 240 


35 


31 through 35 


241 through 260 


36 


36 through 40 . . 


261 through 280 


37 


41 through 45 


281 through 300 


38 


46 tbrouo-h 50 


301 through 320 


39 


51 through 55 


321 through 340 


40 


56 through 60 . . 


341 through 360 


41 


61 through 65 „ 


361 through 380 


42 


66 through 70 


381 through 400 


42 


71 through 75 . . 


401 through 420 


43 


76 through 80.. 


421 through 440... 


44 


81 through 85.. 


441 through 460. 


44 


86 through 90 


461 through 480. 


45 


91 through 95 


481 through 500 


46 


96 through 100 


501 through 520 


47 


101 through 110 


521 through 540 


47 


111 through 120 . . 


541 through 560 


48 


121 through 130 . 


561 through 580 


49 


131 through 140 


581 through 600 


50 


141 through 150 


601 through 620 


51 


151 through 160 


621 through 640. 


52 


161 through 170 


641 through 660... 


53 


171 through 180 


661 through 680 


54 









Scale "B" 

Rates over routes made up in whole or in part of the lines of the Norfolk 
Southern Railroad (See Group C of Circular No. 352), an arbitrary equal 
to 20 per cent of the rates in Scale "A" may be added for that portion of the 
haul over the Norfolk Southern Railroad, subject to a maximum arbitrary 
of 6 cents per 100 pounds, which arbitrary shall accrue solely to the Norfolk 
Southern. 

Scale "C" 

Rates over short or weak lines listed in Group D of Circular No. 352 
shall be made by adding an arbitrary of six (6) cents per 100 pounds to 
the rates in Scale "A," which arbitrary shall accrue solely to said short or 
weak lines. 



Decisions aad Adjustmejn^ts of Complaints 53 

Carriers may, in the publication of these rates, adopt the same system 
of grouping points as used in the publication of interstate rates on petroleum 
and petroleum products. 

By order of the Commission: 

Issued April 7, 1932. R. O. Self, 

Effective May 1, 1932. Clerk. 

Circular No. 351. 

Docket No. 7249. 

Aberdeen & Rockfish Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue non-agency stations and remove side tracks at: 
Endon Junction, Sandhill Orchard Siding, Pates Siding and Mclnnis Siding. 
Granted. No. 7345. 

Atlantic and Western Railway Company to the Commission. Applica- 
tion for authority to make Mamers non-agency prepay station. Granted. 
No. 6988. 

Atlantic and Western Railway Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to make Jonesboro non-agency station. Granted. No. 7284. 

Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to close telegraph office at Pinnacle. Granted. No. 6996. 

Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Company to the Commission. Application 
for discontinuance of passenger service, making strictly freight handled 
line. Certified to Superior Court of Guilford County. No. 7059. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue agency at Clarendon and make same prepay 
station. Denied. No. 6942. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to make Jonesboro prepay station. Granted. No. 6953. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Proposed 
change in schedule in train No. 89. Granted. No. 6958. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue operation of local trains Nos. 33 and 34 run- 
ning between Richmond, Va., and Fayetteville, N. C. Granted. No. 6961. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to close agency at Polkstone. Granted. No. 6969. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to withdraw flag stops at: Patterson, McNatts, and Floral 
College for trains Nos. 64 and 65. Granted. No. 6990. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to close agency at Pactolus, and make same prepay station. 
Granted. No. 7026. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to close agency at Buie, and make same prepay station. 
Granted. No. 7029. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to close agency at Autryville, and make same prepay station. 
Granted. No. 7034. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to close agency at Currie, making same prepay agency. 
Granted. No. 7036. 



54 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue agency at Garysburg, making same prepay 
station. Granted. No. 7040. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue trains Nos. 64 and 65, between Tarboro and 
Rocky Mount. Granted. No. 7065. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue agency at Drum Hill, and make same prepay 
station. Granted. No. 7082. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue agency at Evergreen. Granted. No. 7089. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to close agency at Pleasant Hill. Granted. No. 7096. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and Seaboard Air Line Railroad 
Company to the Commission. Application for authority to discontinue 
agency at Proctorville, and make same prepay agency. Granted. No. 7147. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue agency at Micro. Granted. No. 7175. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue agency at Godwin. Granted. No. 7185. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to close agency at Eure. Granted. No. 7228. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to close agency at Edward. Granted. No. 7238. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue agency at Spring Hill. Granted. No. 7290. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue trains Nos. 50 and 51, between Florence, S. C, 
and Wilmington, N. C. Approved. No, 7330. 

Clinchfield Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for au- 
thority to discontinue agency at Green Mountain. Continued indefinitely. 
No. 7208. 

Clinchfield Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for au- 
thority to discontinue agency at Kona. Granted. No. 7209. 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company to the Commission. Appli* 
cation for authority to discontinue Sunday passenger trains Nos, 1 and 2 
in the State. Granted. No. 7066. 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company to the Commission. Appli- 
cation for change in service of passenger trains Nos. 1 and 2, between 
Chester, S. C, and Lenoir, N. C. Granted. No. 7259. 

Durham and Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue agency at Carpenter and Holly Springs, making 
same prepay stations with caretakers. Granted. No. 7011. 

Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company to the Commission. Appli- 
cation for authority to discontinue trains 7-106 and 101-8, between Murphy, 
N. C, and Knoxville, Tenn. Granted. No. 6967. 

Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company to the Commission. Appli- 
cation for authority to discontinue trains Nos, 102, 103, 104 and 105, between 
Blue Ridge and Murphy. Granted. No. 7288. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 55 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to cljose agency at Steeds, and make same prepay station. 
Granted. No. 6933. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to discontinue trains Nos. 7 and 10, between Goldsboro and Beau- 
fort. Certified to Clerk Superior Court of Wayne County, May, 1931. Sub- 
stitute petition filed later and order issued. No. 6984. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to discontinue handling passengers on mixed train between 
Duncan and Durham. Granted. No. 7008. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to discontinue agency at Wildwood, making same prepay station. 
Granted. No. 7045. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Ryland, making same prepay station. Granted. 
No. 7272. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Trotville, making same prepay station. Granted. 
No. 7073. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Travis, making same prepay station. Granted. 
No. 7074. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Wardville, making same prepay station. 
Granted. No. 7075. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Hobbsville and make same prepay station. 
Granted. No. 7137. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Ether, making same prepay station. Granted. 
No. 7153. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authorized to close agency at Bunnlevel, making same prepay station. Granted. 
No. 7183. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close station at Belcross, making same prepay station. Granted. 
No. 7189. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to abandon telegraph service at Jackson Springs. Granted. No. 7212. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to abandon telegraph service at Linden and Kipling. Granted. 
No. 7222. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application far 
authority to close agency at Simms. Granted. No. 7236. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to discontinue Pullman service on night train between Norfolk 
and Raleigh and New Bern. Granted. No. 7240. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close telegraph office at Center Hill. Granted. No. 7256. 



56 ]NJ^. C. Corporation Commission 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close station at Willow Springs. Granted. Np. 7266. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to abandon telegraph station at Eagle Springs. Granted. No. 7280. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close telegraph office at Fieldsboro. Granted. No. 7281. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close station at Simpson, making same prepay station. Granted. 
No. 7304. 

Dr. J. E, Shepard v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Accident at 
crossing six miles out of Washington, N. C. Dismissed. No. 7057. 

Citizens of Snowden v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Petition 
for caretaker at station. Granted. No. 7161. 

Citizens of Greenville and Pitt County v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Com- 
pany. Petition asking that grade crossing on Highways Nos. 11 and 91 be 
changed to underpass. Dismissed. No. 7293. 

Seaboard Air bine Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
change in train service — Caroleen Sub-division. Granted. No. 6946. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to discontinue Allenton, a seasonal agency. Granted. No. 6950. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application to 
discontinue stops of trains Nos. 3 and 4 at Meredith College, Jordans, Bonsai, 
Olives and Osgood. 

Also to stop for receiving or discharging parcel post and passengers to 
and from Raleigh and Hamlet and beyond: Method, Niagara, Lemon Springs, 
Manly, Pine Bluff, Addor, Cognac, Merry Oaks, Colon, and Marston. Granted. 
No. 6952. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to change schedule of train No. 13. Granted. No. 6968. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Paschall. Granted. No. 6970. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to discontinue agency at Roanoke Rapids. Granted. No. 6999. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to discontinue agency at Thelma. Granted. No. 7027. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Proposed change 
in schedules of trains Nos. 23 and 24, between Boykins and Lewiston. Ap- 
proved. No. 7033. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Vaughan, making same prepay station. With- 
drawn. No. 7044. 

' Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to make change in schedule of mixed trains between Franklin- 
ton and Louisburg. Granted. No. 7052. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to make change in train service between Hamlet and Charlotte. 
Granted. No. 7053. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to make change in schedule and to discontinue certain trains be- 
tween Durham and Oxford. Granted. No. 7060. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 57 

Seaboard Air Dine Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
permission to use own station for passenger business instead of station of 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad at Wilmington. Granted. No. 7061. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to discontinue agency at Osborne. Granted. No. 7062. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to make change in schedule of trains Nos. 5 and 6. Granted. 
No. 7067. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to make change in schedules of trains Nos. 6, 12, 21, 3, 11, 107 
and 207. Granted. No. 7090. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to remove and abandon depot buildiny at Merry Oaks. Granted. 
No. 7099. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to remove and abandon depot building at Merry Oaks. Granted. 
No. 7104. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to consolidate agencies at Kelford and Roxobel. Granted. No. 7112. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to remove building at Pine Bluff. Granted. No. 7115. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to abandon station building at Stubbs. Granted. No. 7122. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to abandon and remove station building at Cognac. Granted. No. 7125. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to abandon station building at Lake View. Granted. No. 7126. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Change in schedule of 
freight and express service on Lewiston Branch. Approved. No. 7130. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to abandon and remove station building at Rosindale. Granted. No. 7150. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to abandon and remove station building at East Arcadia. Granted. No. 7162. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to abandon and remove freight shed at Homestead. Granted. No. 7168. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to abandon and remove depot at Armour. Granted. No. 7173. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to make agency at Ridgeway a seasonal one. Withdrawn. No. 7187. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to abandon and remove old station building at Old Hundred. Granted. 
No. 7194. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to abandon and remove station building at Eastbrook. No. 7200. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to abandon and remove station building at Osborne, substituting therefor 
small covered platform. Granted. No. 7201. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to abandon and remove station building at Indian Trail. Granted. No. 7204. 



58 ISr. C. CoKPOKATioN Commission 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission, Application for authority 
to consolidate agencies at Potecasi and Woodland. Granted. No. 7262. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue telegraph service at: Kittrell, Lemon Springs, Pee Dee, 
Polkton, Potecasi, Ridgeway, Vaughan, Macon and Youngsville. Granted as 
to all stations except Youngsville. No. 7267. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to consolidate trains, and to handle parcel post between Norlina and Hamlet 
by truck. Granted. No. 7269. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
<^ to discontinue trains Nos. 231 and 234. Granted. No. 7292. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue use of Carolina and Northwestern passenger station facilities 
at Lincolnton and use own facilities. Granted. No. 7321. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to make No. 21 mixed train between Monroe and Charlotte Yard and to 
change schedule. Granted. No. 7326. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for motor 
vehicle franchise over Highway No. 20, between Monroe and Hamlet. Cer- 
tified to Superior Court of Wake County, August, 1932. No. 7339. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway to the Commission. Application for authority 
to dismantle station buildings and substitute in lieu thereof shed at: Clay, 
Hester and Tar River. Granted. No. 7350. 

Kiwanis Club of Roanoke Rapids v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. 
Petition to change name of station at Roanoke Junction to Roanoke Rapids. 
Granted. No. 7079. 

Dr. J. E. Thomas v. Seaboard Air Line Railway. Complaint of parcel post 
service at Waxbaw. Adjusted. No. 7128. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application for authority 
to make Penrose and Cherryfield non-agency stations. Granted as to Cherry- 
field. No. 6755. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application for authority 
to make Eufola a non-agency station; also application to make Nebo 
non-agency station. Granted as to Eufola. No. 6906. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Gilkey, making same prepay station. Granted. No. 
6939. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to make Horse Shoe non-agency station. Granted. No. 6941. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue Thermal City as agency station, making same prepay. 
Granted. No. 6944. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to make change in schedule of No. 11 at Asheville. Granted. No. 6957. 

Southern Railway System v. V. L. Hunter and Southern Public Utility 
Company. Complaint of telephone wire crossing near Mile Post 005 at 
Derita. Dismissed. No. 6962. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue operation of trains Nos. 1 and 2, between Asheville, N. C. and 
Spartanburg, S. C. Granted. No. 7004. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 59 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Mooresboro. Granted. No. 7043. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue sleeping car on trains 8-112 eastbound and 111-1 westbound. 
Granted. No. 7058. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue operation of trains Nos. 16 and 13, between Raleigh and 
Goldsboro. Granted. No. 7068. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue mixed freight and passenger trains Nos. 5 and 6, between 
Cunningham and Blanche. Granted. No. 7077. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Change in schedule of 
various trains filed and approved. No. 7088. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue trains Nos. 1 and 2, between Spartanburg, S. C, and Asheville. 
Granted. No. 7113. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to make Claremont non-agency station. Granted. No. 7121. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to make Arden prepay station. Withdrawn. No. 7163. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to make change in service of mixed trains Nos. 5 and 6, operating between 
Hendersonville and Lake Toxaway. Granted. No. 7205. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Patterson Springs. Granted. No. 7211. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue operation of trains Nos. 12 and 15 on Sundays, between 
Charlotte and * Taylorsville. Granted. No. 7232. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue agency at Union Mills. Withdrawn. No. 7258. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue agency at Burch. Granted. No. 7261. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue telegraph service at Graham. Granted. No. 7285. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue telegraph service at E'arl. Granted. No. 7336. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue trains Nos. 1 and 2, between Asheville and Spartanburg. 
Granted. No. 7344. 

Citizens of Clyde v. Southern Railway Company. Petition to have depot 
at Clyde open on Sundays. Dismissed. No. 6838. 

Paul B. Eaton v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of freight train 
blocking highway. Adjusted. No. 6965. 

Shippers of Dewey Siding v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint as 
to abandonment of siding. Dismissed. No. 7056. 

Citizens of Morrisville v. Southern Railway Company and Western Union 
Telegraph Company. Complaint of discontinuence of telegraphic service. 
Adjusted. No. 7198. 



60 ]Sr. C Corporation Commission 

John L. Rendlemen, Sr. v. Southern Railway Company. Protest as to 
bridge on North Ellis Street, Salisbury. Dismissed as not within jurisdiction 
of Commission. No. 7335. 

Tallulah Falls Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Otto, making same prepay station. Granted. 
No. 7311. 

Citizens of Haywood County v. Tennessee and North Carolina Railroad 
Company. Complaint of removal of tracks from Mount Sterling, N. C, to 
Tennessee State Line. Dismissed. No. 7051. 

Townsville Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to discontinue agencies at Townsville and Drewry. Granted. 
No. 6989. 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company to the Commission. Ap- 
plication for authority to discontinue service on Badin Branch. Granted. 
No. 7055. 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company to the Commission. Ap- 
plication for authority to discontinue agencies at Ansonville and Southmont. 
Withdrawn. No. 7272. 

Claims Handled by the Rate Department 

(July 1, 1930, to June 30, 1932) , 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, application to make reparation on shipment 
of resinous wood moving from Rosiers, N. C. to Fayetteville, N. C. on way- 
bill 25383, December 11, 1928. Rate assessed 15 cents per 100 pounds; 
rate desired protected, 5 cents per 100 pounds. Application approved October 
19, 1931. 

Atlas Plywood Corporation, Goldsboro, N. C, claim against the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad in amount of $25.00 alleged overcharge account exces- 
sive assessment of demurrage. Claim upheld. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, application to make reparation on shipment 
of ammoniacal liquor in car PBCX-525, from Greensboro, N. C. on bill of 
lading dated January 13, 1928, covered by A. C. L. Wilmington freight bill 
dated January 16, 1928; rate assessed 36i^ cents per 100 pounds; rate desired 
protected $3.05 per ton of 2,000 pounds, a difference of $4.25 per net ton. 
Application approved October 28, 1930. 

Budd-Piper Roofing Company, Durham, N. C. Damage Claim against 
High Point, Thomasville and Denton Railroad in amount of $446.78 covering 
carload of slate from Poultney, Vermont, March 11, 1930, destined High 
Point, N. C. part of which contents arrived destination in broken condition. 
Claimant advised our Commission without jurisdiction. 

Chattanooga Manufacturers Association, Chattanooga, Tenn., overcharge 
in amount of $9.46 on carload of steel columns shipped from Charlotte, N. C. 
to Pinoca, N. C. on June 18, 1929. Claim approved. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company application to award reparation to 
Cobb-Gwynn Tobacco Company on nine shipments of leaf tobacco, in sheets, 
moving from Whiteville, N. C. to Fairmont, N. C. during the period from 
September 25, 1928 to October 6, 1928. Rate of 221^ cents per 100 pounds 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 61 

assessed. Reparation sought on basis of 20 cents per 100 pounds, difference 
2% cents per hundred pounds. Application approved January 20, 1931. 

R. S. Cooper, Greensboro, N. C. overcharge in amount of $186.66 on ten 
cars of logs moving from Robbinsville, N. C. to High Point, N. C. between 
August 7, 1929 and November 19, 1929. Claim paid. 

Atlantic Marble and Tile Company, Charlotte, N. C, through Charlotte 
Shippers and Manufacturers Association, Charlotte, N. C. claim in amount 
of $9.45 representing overcharge on shipment of stone in bags from 
Lenoir, N. C. July 1, 1929 in car S. A. L. 94468. Order issued requiring 
refund. 

Carolina Shale Brick Company, Norwood, N. C, through Charlotte Ship- 
pers and Manufacturers Association, Charlotte, N. C. claim in amount 
of $9.62 representing overcharge on shipment of common brick from Nor- 
wood, N. C. to Ellerbe, N. C, October 24, 1930, car MP 93262. Denied. 

Consolidated Traffic Service, Wilmington, N. C, claim in amount of $4.69 
overcharge on logs, carload from Councils, N. C. to Wilmington, N. C. during 
latter part of 1929 and early part of 1930. Claim paid August 4, 1931. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, application to waive undercharge 
in amount of $34.70 on one car of common brick from Grant Brick Works, 
Weldon, N. C, December 18, 1929, S. A. L. No. 96312 and one car common 
brick to Tarboro, N. C, March 14, 1930, in S. A. L. No. 96601. Application 
approved November 17, 1930. 

Complaint of Harman and deRundeau, Crimora Roller Mills, Crimora, Va. 
against failure of the Townsville Railroad to render certain services and 
advices in connection with order notify shipments destined to points on 
that line. Complaint disposed of satisfactorily. 

Hanes Dye and Finishing Company, claim of and application of Winston- 
Salem Southbound Railway Company to refund overcharge in amount of 
$28.08 on shipment of Muriatic Acid from Charlotte to Winston-Salem, 
N. C. June 12, account intrastate rate exceeding rate to more distant inter- 
state point. Approved August 23, 1930. 

Application of Norfolk Southern Railroad to waive undercharge on ship- 
ment of steam boilers from Plymouth, N. C. to Belhaven, N. C. in June, 1930. 
Rate collected 17 cents per 100 pounds, rate increased June 10, 1930 to 24 
cents, per 100 pounds, difference 7 cents per 100 pounds. Application ap- 
proved March 24, 1931. 

Rev. N. Collin Hughes, Chapel Hill, N. C. complaint against Southeastern 
Express Company for charging additional 25 cents to deliver trunk to a 
location on the second floor of his residence. Justified. 

Southern Railway Company, application to refund to International Shoe 
Company $231.85 on 35 cars of bark from A. G. Snow, Doughton, N. C; 4 
cars from Currans, N. C. and three cars from Parks, N. C. destined North 
Wilkesboro, N. C. representing difference between through rate and rate 
constructed by use of local factors to and from Elkin. Application approved 
March 4, 1931. 

Southern Railway Company, application to refund to the International 
Shoe Company $158.15 on 31 cars of bark shipped by W. G. Simmons, Thur- 
mond, N. C. to North Wilkesboro, N. C, representing difference between 
charges resulting from application of through rate and rate constructed 



62 'N. C. CoKPORATioN Commission 

by use of local factors combined to and from Elkin. Application approved 
March 4, 1931. 

Interstate Traffic Company, Washington, D, C. claim alleging overcharge 
on A. C. L.-35835, potatoes moving from Pikeville, N. C. to Asheville, N. C. 
June 12, 1930 shipped by Vail Brothers, consigned to Ned Wheeler Brokerage 
Company. Rate charged 52 cents per 100 pounds. Claim settled on basis 
of 45 cents per 100 pounds, a difference of 7 cents per 100 pounds. 

Interstate Traffic Adjustment Company, Norfolk, Virginia, claim in amount 
of $5.24 representing overcharge on shipment of one carload of thin lumber 
from Monroe Park, N. C. to High Point, N. C. Paid July 25, 1930. 

Mt. Gilead Brick Company, Mount Gilead, N. C, claim in amount of 
$7.02 representing overcharge account variance in carload minimum weight* 
Denied. 

Merchants Produce Company, Hickory, N. C, through Charlotte Shippers 
and Manufacturers Association, Charlotte, N. C. alleging overcharge on car 
potatoes from Royal, N. C. to Hickory, N. C. Rate assessed 54 cents. Claim 
settled on basis rate 45 cents per hundred pounds, a difference of 9 cents 
per hundred pounds. 

Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Company, application to award reparation 
to Piedmont Hardware Company in amount of $1.44 on shipment of Stoves 
and Stove Parts from Greensboro, N. C. to King, N. C, said amount being 
error in publication of correct rate. Application approved June 22, 1931. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company, application to waive undercharge in 
amount of $16.44, representing error on part of applicant in quoting legal 
rate on two carload shipments of corn from Pugh Grocery Company, New 
Bern, N. C. to Durham, N. C. Denied. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, application to award reparation 
to Raleigh Granite Company on shipments of crushed stone, carloads, mov- 
ing from Lassiter, N. C. to Nashville, Rocky Mount, Enfield, Farmville, 
Lumberton, Southern Pines, Hobbsville and Stokes, N. C. during period 
of February, 1928 through October, 1930 account error in publication of 
distances. Amount $850.41. Application approved April 13, 1931. 

Robeson Manufacturing Company, Lumberton, N. C, through Carolina 
Traffic Service, Monroe, N. C. claim against the Seaboard Air Line Railway 
in amount of $130.00 representing overcharges on shipments of fertilizer, 
carloads from Lumberton, N. C. to Harnett, N. C, January 3, 1927. Paid 
January 30, 1930. 

Robeson Manufacturing Company, Lumberton, N. C, through Carolina 
Traffic Service, Monroe, N. C. claims in amount of $51.09 representing ex- 
cessive charges on fertilizer materials from Lumberton, N. C. to Roseboro, 
McMillan's Siding, and St. Paul, N. C. via the Virginia and Carolina Southern 
Railroad during January, 1927. Claims paid April, 1930. 

Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company, application to award repara- 
tion in amount of $75.23 on 252 bags of talc from Kinsey, N. C. to Biltmore, 
N. C, April 26, 1930, shipped by the Notla Talc Company, consigned to 
Sayles Biltmore Bleacheries. Application approved September 30, 1930. 

Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad Company application to award reparation 
on 24 bales of cotton shipped from Fayetteville, N. C. to Wilmington, N. C, 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 63 

September 6, 1930, account Alexander Sprunt and Sons, in amount of $18.15. 
Application approved November 3, 1930. 

Star Fish Company, Charlotte, N, C. seeking reparation on car of fresh fish 
from Elizabeth City, N. C. to Charlotte, N. C, November, 1930. Rate 
assessed 58 cents per 100 pounds. Rate established and authorized pro- 
tected 45 cents per 100 pounds, difference of 13 cents per 100 pounds. Claim 
paid February, 1931. 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company application to award repara- 
tion to Swift and Company, Gastonia, N. C. on five cars of crude cottonseed 
oil, from Newton, N. C. to Charlotte, N. C. during October, November and 
December, 1930. Rate assessed 20 cents per hundred pounds. Rate of 17 
cents authorized on January 24, 1931, protected on three cars moving sub- 
sequent to November 1, 1930. 

E. F. Taylor, Goldsboro, N. C, claim in amount of $117.73 and $62.22 
representing breakage of tile moving from Sanfcrd to Goldsboro, N. C. No 
jurisdiction. 

Western Carolina Lumber and Timber Association, Asheville, N. C, claim 
in amount of $6.26 representing overcharge on one car of lumber from 
Robbinsville, N. C. to Ramseur, N. C. Paid March 5, 1931. 

W. G. Womble, Raleigh, N. C. refund of unused portion of passenger ticket 
from Birmingham, Ala. to Raleigh, N. C. amount $21.19, December, 1930. 
Refund made January, 1931. 

Earnhardt Manufacturing Company, Charlotte, N. C, overcharge in amount 
of $9.80 covering one carload of machinery, Southern 14544, shipped from 
Graham, N. C, March 16, 1929, to Charlotte, N. C. Paid March 22, 1932. 

F. M. Bond, Mackeys, N. C. overcharge in amount of $5.43 covering less 
carload shipment of coal tar from Wilmington, N. C, to Mackeys, N. C. in 
February, 1932. Claim paid in July, 1932. 

Carolina Fireproofing Company, Norwood, N. C, overcharge of $3.03 on 
car of brick and hollow building tile from Gulf, N. C. to Salisbury, N. C. 
Claim denied. 

Hoke Oil and Fertilizer Company, Raeford, N. C. amount $341.45, Cotton- 
seed carload from various North Carolina points to Raeford, N. C. Denied. 

Banks 

Aydlett and Simpson, representing petitioner, to the Commission. Peti- 
tion asking for hearing in the matter of Carolina Banking and Trust 
Company of Elizabeth City. Commission advised later hearing not requested. 
No. 6872. 

IN RE: ASSESSME'NT OF STOCKHOLDERS OF THE CITIZENS BANK, 

WINDSOR, N. C. 

Order 
Under and by virtue of the authority contained in Subsection 13 of 
Section 218 (c). Consolidated Statutes, it appearing to the Corporation 
Commission that an assessment against the stockholders of the Citizens Bank, 
Windsor, North Carolina, is necessary in order to discharge the liability 
to general creditors of said Citizens Bank, the Corporation Commission of 



64 ^. C. Corporation Commission 

the State of North Carolina hereby levies an assessment against the stock- 
holders of the Citizens Bank equal to the stock liability of each stock- 
holder, the amount of stock owned by him by record of the said Citizens 
Bank on September 30, 1930, as shown by the audit on file in the Banking 
Department. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 9th day of December, 1930. Clerk. 

IN RE: ASSESSMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS OF THE RALEIGH BANKING 
AND TRUST COMPANY, RALEIGH, N. C. 

Order 
Under and by virtue of the authority contained in Subsection 13 of Section 
218 (c). Consolidated Statutes, it appearing to the Corporation Commission 
that an assessment against the stockholders of the Raleigh Banking and 
Trust Company, Raleigh, North Carolina, is necessary in order to discharge 
the liability to general creditors of said Raleigh Banking and Trust Company, 
the Corporation Commission of the State of North Carolina hereby levies 
an assessment against the stockholders of the Raleigh Banking and Trust 
Company equal to the stock liability of each stockholder, the amount of 
stock owned by him by record of the said Raleigh Banking and Trust 
Company on September 15, 1930, as shown by the audit on file in the Bank- 
ing Department. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 30th day of October, 1930. Clerk. 



Blue Sky 



Franklin Title and Mortgage Guaranty Company to the Commission. Ap- 
plication for registration of installment guaranteed first Mortgage certificates. 
Dismissed. No. 7003. 



Bus Companies 



IN RE: APPLICATION OF COY H. ANDERSON, FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH 
CAROLINA, FOR FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE TO COVER MOTOR 
VEHICLE PASSENGER OPERATION UNDER CHAPTER 136, PUBLIC 
LAWS OF 1927, AND AMENDMENTS, BETWEEN FAYETTEVILLE AND 
GOLDSBORO VIA. CLINTON, BEAMAN'S CROSS ROADS AND NEWTON 
GROVE, HIGHWAYS NOS. 24, 60 AND 102. 

Order 

This application was set for hearing by the Commission and hearing was 
held at ten o'clock a.m., Tuesday, April 26, 1932. The petitioner appeared 
and was also represented by counsel, and it appearing that there was no 
operation on the line for which application was made, it is 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 65 

Ordered, That the application be granted and franchise certificate be issued 
upon formal compliance with the requirements of the law and rules and 
regulations by the applicant. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 2d day of May, 1932. ' Clerk. 

IN RE: APPLICATION OF LE'E M. BARNARD FOR FRANCHISE TO 
OPERATE AS A MOTOR VEHICLE CARRIER BETWEEN THE TOWNS 
OF REIDSVILLE VIA CERTAIN COUNTY ROADS TO KERNERSVILLE. 
THENCE FROM KERNERSVILLE TO WINSTON-SALEM OVER HIGH- 
WAY NO. 771. 

Order 

Hearing was held by the Commission on this petition at its office, in 
Raleigh, on May 19, 1931, and petitioner and the Camel City Coach Company, 
opposing the granting of the petition, were represented by attorneys. 
Evidence was presented by petitioner, but the evidence presented did not 
prove public convenience and necessity for the operation petitioned for, there 
being frequent service between Reidsville and Kernersviile via Greensboro 
and frequent service between Kernersviile and Winston-Salem. That part 
of the county roads over which petitioner proposed to operate is too thinly 
settled to support an operation; therefore, the petitioner would have to 
depend upon the passenger traffic between Reidsville and Kernersviile and 
Kernersviile and Winston-Salem to warrant such operation; and, since these 
towns are already apparently adequately served, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be, and it is hereby, dismissed. 

By order of the Commission: R, 0. Self, 

This 20th day of July, 1931. Clerk. 

CAROLINA COACH COMPANY, PETITIONER v. QUE'EN CITY COACH 
COMPANY, CAMEL CITY COACH COMPANY, CHARLOTTE-RALEIGH 
BUS LINE, INCORPORATED, AND W. M. MEEKS, RESPONDENTS. 

Order 

It appearing to the Commission from the motion and affidavit of L. A. Love, 
dated May 17, 1932, and filed with the Commission, together with a notice, 
dated May 9, 1932, addressed to the Carolina Coach Company, in which 
affidavit is set forth various reasons why it is necessary for the respondents 
to have access to various books and records listed in detail in said notice; 
and 

Whereas, said respondents have requested that the Corporation Com- 
mission require the production of said books, records and data at the hearing 
on May 23, 1932; and 

Whereas, the Commission is advised that the attorneys for the Carolina 
Coach Company desire to be heard in opposition to the production of said 
records, books, and data; and 

Whereas, the Commission, on account of the absence of some of its mem- 
bers, is not now ready to hear arguments for and against the production 
of said books, records, and data; it is now, therefore, 

6 



66 I^. C. Corporation Commission 

Ordered, That the Carolina Coach Company and its attorneys he, and 
they are hereby, directed to be prepared to produce at the hearing to be 
held on May 23, 1932, all such books, records, and data listed and called 
for in said notice, except the interline contracts referred to in Section 1 of 
said notice, at which time the Commission will then decide whether said 
books, records, and data are relevant to the determination of the matter 
before the Commission and will then hear arguments from the petitioner 
and the respondents as to the relevance and materiality of said records, 
books, and data. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 18th day of May, 1932. Clerk. 

IN RB: FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE NO. 267, DIXIE MOTOR EXPRESS, 
INCORPORATED, FREMONT, N. C. 

Ordeb 

By virtue of the fact that Franchise Certificate No. 267. issued to Dixie 
Motor Express, Inc., on January 28, 1929, covering motor vehicle freight 
operation between Wilmington, North Carolina, and the North Carolina- 
Virginia State Line over Highway No. 40 and between Weldon, North Caro- 
lina, and the North Carolina-Virginia State Dine, Highways Nos. 48 and 30, 
expired on January 28, 1932, and has not been renewed, and it appearing 
that it can not be renewed, it is 

Ordered, That the highways over which the said operation of Dixie MotoT 
Express, Inc., was conducted are hereby declared vacant so far as this 
franchise is concerned. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This May 4, 1932. Clerk. 

IN RE: APPLICATION OF EAST COAST STAGES, INCORPORATED, FOR 
TRANSFER TO IT OF FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE NO. 333, ISSUED 
TO THE SAFETY TRANSIT COMPANY. 

Ordeb 

Mr. H. Pierce Brawner, Vice President of East Coast Stages, Inc., ap- 
peared before the Commission at a hearing at 10 o'clock a.m., August 16, 
1932, hearing upon the application of East Coast Stages having been duly 
set and notices of hearing having been served upon Union Trust Company 
of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland; American Bank and Trust Company, 
Richmond, Virginia; Mr. Lewis C. Williams, Richmond, Virginia; and upon 
Mr. Brawner as vice president of The Safety Transit Company. The notice 
of hearing carried the information that application had been made for the 
transfer of Franchise Certificate No. 333, in the name of The Safety Transit 
Company, to East Coast Stages, to which the assets of The Safety Transit 
Company had been sold and transferred by court order in Baltimore, Mary- 
land, on July 27, 1932, for delivery August 1, 1932, subject to the approval 
of the North Carolina Corporation Commission. No other appearances were 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 67 

made by parties at interest. The following letter, dated August 8, 1932, 
from Mr, Francis B. Wiers, Assistant Secretary, Union Trust Company of 
Maryland, was read by the Commission's Clerk: 

We enclose Corporation Commission of North Carolina Certificate 
No. 333 in the name of The Safety Transit Company and request that 
a new certificate be issued in the name of East Coast Stages, Inc., sub- 
ject to all the existing liens from The Safety Transit Company. 

We may add that the sale of the assets of The Safety Transit Company 
to the East Coast Stages, Inc., was passed by Decree of Court dated 
July 27, 1932. 

When the new certificate has been issued, will you kindly return the 
same direct to the writer of this letter? 

No appearance was made by the American Bank and Trust Company or 
by Mr. Lewis C. Williams, Trustees, both of Richmond, Virginia; therefore, 
it is 

Ordered, That the said Franchise Certificate No. 333, in the name of 
The Safety Transit Company, be transferred to East Coast Stages, Inc., and 
that a new certificate be issued bearing date of August 1, 1932, and forwarded 
to the Union Trust Company of Maryland, at Baltimore. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 16th day of August, 1932. Clerk. 

IN RE: AMENDMENT OF FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE NO. 289 BY 
ELIMINATION OF THE ROUTE FAYETTEVILLE TO KINSTON VIA 
CLINTON, WARSAW AND KENANSVILLE, HIGHWAYS NOS. 24, 40 
AND 11. 

Order 

This matter came on for hearing at 10 o'clock a.m., Tuesday, April 26, 
1932. The franchise certificate holder, Safety Transit Company, not making 
appearance and service over the route Fayetteville to Kinston having been 
discontinued by the said certificate holder for an indefinite period, longer 
than that required by statute to warrant the cancellation of the authority 
to operate between Fayetteville and Kinston via Clinton, Warsaw and Kenans- 
ville. Highways Nos. 24, 40 and 11; it is 

Ordered, That Franchise Certificate No. 289 be, and it is hereby, amended, 
eliminating therefrom the route described thereon as Fayetteville to Kinston 
via. Clinton, Warsaw and Kenansville, Highways Nos. 24, 40 and 11. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 2d day of May, 1932. Clerk. 

IN RE: GOLDEN BELT BUS LINE v. SAFETY TRANSIT COMPANY 

Order 

Safety Transit Company of Raleigh, North Carolina, filed application with 
the Commission for permission to transfer intrastate franchise certificates, 
granted for the transportation of pasengers under Chapter 136, Public Laws 
of 1927, to The Safety Transit Company of Maryland, with offices and head- 
quarters in Baltimore, subject to certain hypothecations which have been 



68 iST. C Corporation Commission 

made by Safety Transit Company of North Carolina, with certain financial 
institutions in Richmond, Virginia. 

The Golden Belt Bus Line, which holds franchise between Durham and 
Henderson via, Oxford, leased its operation to Safety Transit Lines, In- 
corporated. Safety Transit Company of North Carolina, acquired the lease 
at Receiver's sale of Safety Transit Lines, Incorporated; and, prior to its 
expiration, surrendered it to the owner, the Golden Belt Bus Line, without 
exercising the option to buy, which was incorporated in the lease. The 
Golden Belt Bus Line, through its attorneys, now asks the Commission to 
refuse to grant the request of Safety Transit Company of North Carolina, 
to transfer its properties to The Safety Transit Company of Maryland. 

The matter was heard on January 22, 1931, and the Commission having 
before it the question of the lease of Safety Transit Company of North 
Carolina, to The Safety Transit Company of Maryland, is of the opinion 
that the request of the Golden Belt Bus Line is a matter which the Com- 
mission does not have the authority at law to take in consideration in 
connection with the petition before it; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition of the Golden Belt Bus Line be, and it is 
hereby, dismissed; and, it is 

Further Ordered, That the lease of August 1, 1930, between Safety Transit 
Company of North Carolina, and The Safety Transit Company of Maryland, 
be approved, subject to the hypothecations hereinbefore referred to, and 
that the franchise certificates now held by Safety Transit Company of North 
Carolina, be transferred to The Safety Transit Company of Maryland. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 22d day of January, 1931. Clerk. 

IN RE: CANCELLATION OF FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE NO. 318, ISSUED 
TO HAWKINS MOTOR EXPRESS, R. L. HAWKINS, OWNER, NORTH 
WILKESBORO, N. C. 

Order 

Notice having been duly served upon R. L. Hawkins, holder of Franchise 
Certificate No. 318 in the name of Hawkins Motor Express, covering motor 
freight operation between Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and the North 
Carolina-Virginia State Line via Highways Nos. 65 and 70, to show cause 
to the Commission on or before May 13, 1932, why his franchise certificate 
should not be cancelled; and the said R. L. Hawkins having failed to appear 
and show cause; it is, now, therefore. 

Ordered, That Franchise Certificate No. 318 of Hawkins Motor Express, 
R. L. Hawkins, owner, be, and it is hereby, cancelled. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 25th day of May, 1932. Cleric. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 69 

IN RE: APPLICATION OF MORRIS PLAN BANK OF VIRGINIA, AT 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, FOR CANCELLATION OF AUTHORITY 
GRANTED BY THE NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION 
ON APRIL 5, 1929, TO HENDERSONVILLE BUS COMPANY, J. M. 
BROOKS, OWNER, TO HYPOTHECATE ITS FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE 
NO. 266. 

Oedeb 

At a meeting of the Corporation Commission, held August 18, 1931, a 
motion was made before it, and granted, to cancel the hypothecation 
authority issued by the Commission on April 5, 1929, authorizing the Hen- 
dersonville Bus Company to hypothecate its Franchise Certificate No. 266, 
dated February 1, 1929; therefore, it is 

Okdereb, That the said hypothecation authority be, and it is hereby, 
cancelled pending hearing before the Commission at ten o'clock a.m., Wednes- 
day, August 26, 1931, for the purpose of hearing the petitioner in this matter. 
Any and all other parties who may have an interest in the matter are hereby 
ordered to appear and be heard at that time. It is 

Further orderei>, That a copy of this order be served upon the petitioner, 
the Morris Plan Bank of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia; the Hendersonville 
Bus Company, Hendersonville, N. C; J. M. Brooks and C. E. Brooks, 
personally, both of Hendersonville, North Carolina. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 18th day of August, 1931. Glerh. 

IN RE: PETITION OF HENDERSONVILLE BUS COMPANY, JOHN M. 
BROOKS, OWNER, FOR AUTHORITY TO HYPOTHECATE ITS 
FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE NO. 266 TO C. W. WIECKING. 

Order 

On August 18, 1931, this Commission issued an order, cancelling its 
authority issued under date of April 5, 1929, authorizing the Hendersonville 
Bus Company, John M. Brooks, owner, to hypothecate its Franchise Certificate 
No. 266, dated February 1, 1929; and, at the hearing held on August 26, 
1931, made its order of August 18, 1931, permanent, with the provision that 
the parties whose interests were presented at the hearing on August twenty- 
sixth, viz.; Citizens National Bank of Hendersonville, North Carolina, and 
Morris Plan Bank of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, work out some satisfactory 
method for protecting their individual interests. 

Now comes John M. Brooks, owner of the Hendersonville Bus Company, 
presenting releases from D. A. Randleman, Receiver of the Citizens Na- 
tional Bank of Hendersonville, North Carolina, and from the Morris Plan 
Bank of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia from previous hypothecations; filing 
aflidavit to the effect that there are no other outstanding encumbrances 
against the said Franchise Certificate No. 266; and asking that he be given 
authority to hypothecate said Franchise Certificate No. 266 to C. W. Wiecking 



70 IN". C. Corporation Commission 

of Henderson County, North Carolina, to secure the payment of a note in the 

sum of $21,500.00; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted. R. 0. Self, 

This 29th day of January, 1932. Clerk. 

IN THE MATTER OF APPLICATION OF HOPE VALLEY STAGES, IN- 
CORPORATED, FOR FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE, ETC. 

Ordes 

The petition in the above entitled cause came on to be heard before 
the Corporation Commission on March 18, 1932, and it appearing that bus 
service between Durham and Chapel Hill is at present adequate, that the 
service contemplated by petitioners promises no profit and is therefore 
hazardous, and that to grant a franchise to petitioners would most probably 
mean financial disaster to them as well as to greatly impair the franchise 
of the Carolina Coach Company, the present operator between these two 
points, without adding to the convenience of any great number of people; 
and it further appearing that the Carolina Coach Company can now serve 
the people sought to be served by petitioners without additional franchise 
rights it is, therefore, 

Ordered, That the petition be denied. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This April 1, 1932. Clerk. 

IN RE: LAFAYETTE TRANSIT COMPANY AND CAROLINA LINES, IN- 
CORPORATED, MOTOR VEHICLE PROPERTY CARRIERS. 

Order. 

This case comes before the Commission at this time upon the motion 
of the Motor Vehicle Director to cancel the franchises of the carriers named 
above for irregular operations under their respective franchise cetificates, 
for violating their approved tariffs, and for soliciting business on routes of 
other franchised operators. 

Carolina Lines, Incorporated, began operation first as the Carolina Truck 
Transportation Company on November 25, 1925, and for a long time operated 
over the roads of Eastern North Carolina connecting with the inland water- 
way. It. has recently moved headquarters from New Bern, North Carolina, 
to Norfolk, Virginia, where it is doing a large interstate operation without 
regard to destinations in this State. It claims that it was forced to 
move away because the boat line with which it had connections cancelled 
its contract and made a contract with the Lafayette Transit Company. 

LaFayette Transit Company has been operating under franchise since 
July 18, 1928. On February 14, 1931, it made application to the Commission 
for the approval of a contract with a boat line plying on the inland water- 
way. The Commission heard the petition but refused to approve the con- 
tract; and, in addition to executing the contract, the LaFayette Transit 



DeCISIOJN^S AND ADJUSTMENTS OF COMPLAINTS 71 

Company advertised in Eastern North Carolina newspapers for business 
other than that covered by the contract for transportation over other 
franchised lines and entirely away from its franchised route. LaFayette 
Transit Company admitted the foregoing facts and contended that it had 
the right under the Bus Law to carry commodities from any section of the 
State to any other point regardless of its franchise. The LaFayette Transit 
Company challenged the authority of the Commission to refuse to grant a 
franchise when application was made under the provisions of the statute 
in accordance with its requirements; and it further contended that the Com- 
mission had no authority to revoke its intrastate franchise certificate be- 
cause of the character of service it has been operating off its franchise 
route. 

The Commission is of the opinion that it has plenary power under the 
Bus Act to issue franchise certificates, to supervise operation thereunder, 
and to cancel any franchise certificate for cause, and so holds, relying upon 
powers and authority given it in Sections 2, 3, 7, 8 and 10 of Chapter 136, 
Public Laws of 1927, and amendments; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That, where a franchise carrier has the transportation of property 
upon contract or call, where either the origin or destination, or both, is 
not upon the carrier's franchised route and where in the performance of 
which there is no implied or specifically agreed repetition and it may be 
completely terminated by the use of one or more trucks, or trucks with 
trailers, leaving the place of load origin on a single date to place or places 
of destination, such contract or call trips may be performed under the 
authority of the second proviso of Section 2, Chapter 136, Public Laws of 
1927, as amended; but, where there is implied, agreed, or actual repetition 
of trips of performance, regular or irregular, on different dates, contracts, 
or agreements, covering such operation shall be filed with the Commission 
for approval before effective and before performance begins to take place; 
and when, and if, any such contracts, or agreements, be approved, such 
carrier shall not be permitted to solicit any other business nor to perform 
any other transportation service on or over routes of other franchise car- 
riers in connection therewith; provided, that such carriers may, when 
transporting commodities in one direction for milling, processing, or manu- 
facturing, carry upon return the milled, processed, or manufactured product 
when the consignee is the original shipper; and it is 

Further ordered, That Franchise Certificate No. 279 of Carolina Lines, 
Incorporated, and Franchise Certificate No. 255 of LaFayette Transit Com- 
pany be, and they are hereby, cancelled, effective March 1, 1932; they will, 
however, be reissued, with such alterations or amendments as may be 
deemed expedient, upon proper showing of satisfactory proof of compliance 
with the provisions of the foregoing paragraph during the period of proba- 
tion; and, it is 

Further ordered, That, effective December 31, 1931, the above rule with 
reference to contract and call trips shall apply to all property carriers 
operating under franchise certificates issued under authority of Chapter 136, 
Public Laws of 1927, as amended. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 29th day of December, 1931. Clerk. 



72 'N. C. Corporation Commission 

IN RE: LAFAYETTE TRANSIT COMPANY AND CAROLINA LINES, IN- 
CORPORATED, MOTOR VEHICLE PROPERTY CARRIERS. 

Oeder Amending Order of December 29, 1931 

The Commission made an order in the above matter under date of Decem- 
ber 29, 1931, with reference to certain conditional cancellation of franchises 
held by the above-named companies. Now comes Carolina Lines, In- 
corporated, and files a motion with the Commission, asking that an order 
be entered to the effect that that part of said order which provided a proba- 
tion period for and the cancellation of the said Carolina Lines' Franchise 
Certificate No. 279 be stricken from said order of December 29, 1931. 

The Commission heard argument on said motion by attorneys for Carolina 
Lines, Incorporated, and said Carolina Lines, Incorporated, has furnished 
to the Commission satisfactory proof of its compliance with the said order; 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, That that portion of said order of December 29, 1931, which 
refers to the cancellation of Franchise Certificate No. 279 of Carolina Lines, 
Incorporated, and the subsequent appearance by it before the Corporation 
Commisson at the end of probation period therein referred to, be, and it is 
hereby, stricken out and rendered null and void. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 12th day of January, 1932. Clerk. 

NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION v. LENOIR-BLOWING 
ROCK LINE, INCORPORATED. 

Order 

This case grew out of certain irregularities existing in the organization 
of the Lenoir-Blowing Rock Line, Inc., operating under Chapter 136, Public 
Laws of 1927, and amendments, between Hickory and Boone, N. C, and 
between Morganton and North Wilkesboro, N. C. 

The parties owning stock in this corporation were notified at the same 
time that the corporation was notified to show cause on or before eleven 
o'clock a.m., Tuesday, April 26i, 1932, why the franchise certificate issued 
to the said corporation should not be cancelled for irregularities, to wit: 
Violation of subsection B of Section 10, Chapter 136, Public Laws of 1927, 
and more particularly of Paragraphs 3, 4, 7 and 8 of said sub-section B 
of Section 10, aild for other irregularities and especially for failure to operate 
the kind of bus service that the public generally demands between Hickory 
and Boone, via Lenoir, and between Morganton and North Wilkesboro, via 
Lenoir. 

At the hearing, the majority stockholders were either present or repre- 
sented. No evidence was presented, except in informal discussion between 
the stockholders as to certain vested rights. These differences were agree- 
ably adjusted at the hearing and it was agreed to discontinue and dissolve 
the corporation and transfer the franchise of the said Lenoir-Blowing Rock 
Line, Inc., to the Statesville-Salisbury Coach Company, the holder of the 
majority stock at the time of hearing; therefore, it is 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 73 

Ordered, That Franchise Certificate No. 22 of the Lenoir-Blowing Rock: 
Line, Inc., be, and it is hereby, cancelled, effective April 26, 1932. 
By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 2d day of May, 1932. Clerk. 

IN RE: PETITION MILLER MOTOR EXPRESS TO CANCEL FRANCHISE 
OF PIE'RCE AND FORMY DUVAL, INCORPORATED. 

Order 

This matter having come before the Commission on the petition of Miller 
Motor Express to cancel the franchise of Pierce and Formy Duval, In- 
corporated, and it appearing to the Commission that Miller Motor Express 
holds a franchise from Charlotte to Wilmington and Pierce and Formy 
Duval, Incorporated, from Wilmington to Hamlet; and it further appearing 
to the Commission from evidence adduced at the hearing that Pierce and 
Formy Duval, Incorporated, has accepted freight for transportation from 
Charlotte and points intermediate between Charlotte and Hamlet, on which 
route it has no franchise; and it further appearing to the Commission that 
the said solicitation and acceptance of said freight is in violation of the law; 
it is, now, therefore, 

Ordered, That henceforth the said Pierce and Formy Duval, Incorporated, 
shall solicit and transport no freight originating at Charlotte or any point 
between Charlotte and Hamlet to any point between Charlotte and Hamlet, 
including Hamlet, but that it shall have the right to solicit and accept 
shipments originating in Charlotte whose destinations are points east of 
Hamlet and shall have the right to solicit and accept shipments from points 
east of Hamlet for Charlotte. 

This order was made in the presence of Mr. E. B. Bridges, representing 
Miller Motor Express, and Mr. George Thomas Clark, representing Pierce 
and Formy Duval, Incorporated. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 18th day of March, 1932. Clerh. 

IN RE: CANCELLATION OF FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE NO. 119, ISSUED 
TO J. E. MITCHELL, KINSTON, N. C. 

Order 

Whereas, Franchise Certificate No. 119 was issued to J. E. Mitchell, 
Kinston, North Carolina, on August 25, 1925, with renewals on the expira- 
tion dates of August 25, 1928, and August 25, 1931; and 

Whereas, the operation of passenger transportation service by motor vehicles 
under this franchise has been abandoned by J. E. Mitchell as of December 31, 
1931; it is, therefore. 

Ordered, That Franchise Certificate No. 119, referred to above, be, and it 
is hereby, cancelled. 

By order of the Commission: R, O. Self, 

This 1st day of February, 1932. Clerk. 



74 'N. C. CoEPOEATioN Commission 

IN RE: CANCELLATION FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE NO. 320, PRIVETT 
TRANSFER COMPANY, A. A. PRIVETT, OWNER, WILSON, N. C. 

Order 

Franchise Certibcate No. 320 was issued to Privett Transfer Company, 
Wilson, N. C, August 25, 1930. The annual report of this company for the 
year 1931 covered the period January 1, 1931, to June 1, 1931, as the only 
period of its operation during that year and it appearing that tax settle- 
ment was made for the same period named above and that Privett Transfer 
Company appears to have ceased operation as of June 1, 1931, and that there 
are numerous complaints outstanding against this corporation, the effect 
of which would be to cause the cancellation of the franchise, it is 

Ordered, That Franchise No. 320 issued to A. A. Privett, operating as 
Privett Transfer Company, Wilson, N. C, be and it is hereby cancelled as 
of June 1, 1931. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This May 4th, 1932. Clerk. 

IN RE: APPLICATION OF RECEIVERS OF SEABOARD AIR LINE RAIL- 
WAY COMPANY FOR MOTOR VEHICLE FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE 
OVEH HIGHWAY NO. 20 BETWEEN MONROE AND HAMLET, NORTH 
CAROLINA. 

Order 

This case was heard by the Commission on April 12, 1932, at eleven 
o'clock a.m. with all Commissioners present. The petitioner was represented 
by Attorney Murray Allen, of Raleigh, N. C, and the respondents, Miller Motor 
Express and the North Carolina Truck Owners Association, were represented 
by Attorneys E. B. Bridges, of Charlotte, and W. P. Horton, of Raleigh. 
No evidence was presented, but the law and the expediency of granting 
such application were argued by attorneys. 

After due consideration of the arguments presented and of the convenience 
of the proposed service to the public between the points named in the ap- 
plication, it is 

Ordered, That the application be granted and that franchise certificate 
be issued upon compliance with the provisions of the law and the rules 
and regulations made thereunder; that the Seaboard Air Line Railway Com- 
pany be authorized to carry thereunder such freights and commodities as 
may be delivered to it at its stations at Monroe and Hamlet and stations 
intermediate for transportation by the said Seaboard Air Line Railway 
Company. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 9th day of June, 1932. Clerk. 

Winborne, Commissioner, Dissenting: I have serious misgivings as to 
the wisdom of the Order made by the Commission on June 9, 1932, on the 
application of the Receivers of the Seaboard Air Line Railway Company 
for motor vehicle franchise certificate over Highway No. 20 between Monroe 
and Hamlet, North Carolina. While I fully appreciate and sympathize with 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 75 

the railroads in their present financial predicament, I do not believe that 
the solution lies in granting franchises over routes now amply served which 
transfer railway transportation from its present right-of-way to the State 
Highways, therefore, I can not fully agree with the findings in the Order. 

IN RE: APPLICATION OF RECEIVERS OF SEABOARD AIR LINE RAIL- 
WAY COMPANY FOR MOTOR VEHICLE FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE 
OVER HIGHWAY NO. 20, BETWEEN MONROE AND HAMLET, NORTH 
CAROLINA 

Order Overruling Exceptions of Respondents 

Now come the Miller Motor Express and the North Carolina Truck 
Owners Association and file exceptions to the order of the Commission, dated 
the 9th day of June, 1932, granting the above petition and, after due con- 
sideration of the exceptions set forth to the said order of the Commission, 
the said exceptions having been filed within the time specified by statute, 
it is, therefore, 

Ordered, That the exceptions of respondents be, and the same are hereby 
overruled. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 13th day of August, 1932. Clerh. 

IN RE: CANCELLATION OF FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE NO. 357, ISSUED 
TO SMITH-BEST TRANSPORTATION COMPANY, FARMVILLE, NORTH 
CAROLINA, IJNDER CHAPTER 136, PUBLIC LAWS OF 1927, AND 
AMENDMENTS. 

Order 

Notice having been served upon Messrs. C. W. Smith and D. C. Best, 
operators of a motor freight service under Chapter 136, Public Laws of 1927, 
as Smith-Best Transportation Company, to show cause on or before July 28, 
1932, why their franchise certificate should not be cancelled; and ap- 
pearance having been made in accordance with said notice; it is 

Ordered, That Franchise Certificate No. 357, issued to Smith-Best Trans- 
portation Company, be, and it is hereby, cancelled as of August 5, 1932. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 10th day of August, 1932. OZerfe. 

IN RE: CANCELLATION OF FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE NO. 286 ISSUED 
TO SOUTHERN TRANSPORTATION COMPANY, GREENVILLE, NORTH 
CAROLINA. 

Order 

Whereas, the Southern Transportation Company, B. D. Moody, owner, had 
its Franchise Certificate No. 286 hypothecated to Dr. L. J. Herring of 
Wilson, North Carolina, as security for certain notes, subject to the continu- 
ing right of the Corporation Commission to approve the purchaser under 
any foreclosure sale, it has now developed that Dr. Herring had to foreclose 
the hypothecation and in order to protect his interest purchased the franchise 



76 'N. C. CoKPosATioN Commission 

and certain vehicles at the sale. The matter has been held in abeyance 
for some time pending the outcome of bankruptcy proceedings of B. D. 
Moody in Federal Court. It appears now that this has been settled so 
far as any question about his operating equipment is concerned and Dr. 
Herring requests authority to sell the franchise to Mr. A. A. Privett of 
Wilson; therefore, the franchise rights as outlined in Franchise Certificate 
No. 286, issued to the Southern Transportation Company, have been duly 
transferred to Mr. A. A. Privett. It is, therefore, 

Ordered, That Franchise Certificate No. 286 be, and it is hereby, cancelled 
as of August 25, 1930. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Sei.f, 

This 25th day of August, 1930. Clerk. 

IN RE : WARD-PERRY MOTOR EXPRESS INCORPORATED. 

Order 

Whereas the above named truck operator ceased to operate under Franchise 
Certificate No. 294 on December 31, 1929, and whereas the insurance cover- 
ing the equipment operated by said Company has been cancelled as of 
June 4, 1930, it is, hereby, 

Ordered, That the said Franchise Certificate No. 294 be, and the same 
Is, hereby, cancelled by authority granted the Corporation Commission in 
Chapter 136, Public Laws of 1927. It is further 

Ordered, That the deposit to guarantee the payment of tax, which is 
now on file with the Commissioner of Revenue, will be subject to such 
adjustment as the Ward-Perry Motor Express, Incorporated, shall make 
with the Commissioner of Revenue. It is further 

Ordered, That copies of this order be sent to Mr. W. S. Privott of Edenton, 
N. C, Attorney for the Ward-Perry Motor Express, Incorporated, and to the 
Commissioner of Revenue, A. J. Maxwell. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 13th day of August, 1930. Clerk. 

IN RE: APPLICATION OF MORRIS PLAN BANK OF VIRGINIA, AT 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, FOR CANCELLATION OF AUTHORITY 
GRANTED BY THE NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION 
ON APRIL 5, 1929, TO HENDERSONVILLE BUS COMPANY, J. M. 
BROOKS, OWNETl, TO HYPOTHECATE ITS FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE 
NO. 266. 

Order 

At a meeting of the Corporation Commission, held August 18, 1931, a 
niotion was made before it, and granted, to cancel the hypothecation authority 
issued by the Commission on April 5, 1929, authorizing the Hendersonville 
Bus Company to hypothecate its Franchise Certificate No. 266, dated February 
1, 1929; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the said hypothecation authority be, and it is hereby, 
cancelled pending hearing before the Commission at ten o'clock a.m., Wednes- 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 77 

day, August 2&, 1931, for the purpose of hearing the petitioner in this matter. 

Any and all other parties who may have an interest in the matter are 

hereby ordered to appear and be heard at that time. It is 
Further ordered, That a copy of this order be served upon the petitioner, 

the Morris Plan Bank of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia; the Hendersonville 

Bus Company, Hendersonville, N. C; J. M. Brooks and C. E. Brooks, 

personally, both of Hendersonville, North Carolina. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 18th day of August, 1931. Clerk. 



Docket No. 7114. 



Motor Bus Lines 



FRANCHISES GRANTED UNDER AUTHORITY OF CHAPTER 136, PUBLIC 
LAWS OF NORTH CAROLINA, 1927, OUTSTANDING ON SEPT. 1, 1932. 

Name of Company, Description of Route. (Numbers shown are 
State Highway Numhers.) 

Allen, J. R., Louisburg, N. C. 

Freight: Louisburg to Franklinton, 56. 

Atlantic Greyhound Lines of North Carolina, Incorporated, J. L. Gilmer, Pres- 
ident, 935 S. Marshall Street, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Passenger: Winston-Salem to Charlotte, 65, 90, 26; Winston-Salem to North 
Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination Martinsville, Va., 77; Winston- 
Salem to the North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination Hillsville, 
Va., 66 via Mount Airy; Winston-Salem to High Point, 77; Winston-Salem 
to Greensboro via Kernersville, 60; Winston-Salem to the North Carolina- 
Tennessee State Line via North Wilkesboro and West Jeffrson, 60, 16; also 
via 60 via Boone and Zionville; Jefferson to Boone, 691; Winston-Salem to 
Lexington, 66; Salisbury to Mocksville, 80; Charlotte to North Carolina- 
South Carolina State Line via Pineville, 26, 261; Statesville to Mount Airy, 
26, 268, 80; Greensboro to the North Carolina-Virginia State Line, 70; 
Kernersville to intersection of 771 and 77 over No. 771. 

Bass Bonded Trucks, Incorporated, A. B. Bass, President and Manager, 

Tarboro, N. C. 

Freight: Farmville to Roanoke Rapids, 12, 125, 40, 48, 481 via Tarboro, 
Scotland Neck, Halifax, Weldon and Rosemary. 

Belch, A. T., Colerain, N. C. 

Freight: Colerain via Mill Neck Road to Harrellsville, thence via Glover's 
Cross Roads to Colerain. 

Bellamy, €. F., Little River, S. C. 

Freight: Wilmington to North Carolina-South Carolina State Line, 20, 30. 

Bethel-Columbia Bus Line, A. B. Babcock, Tarboro, N. C. 

Passenger: Bethel to Plymouth, 90; Wilson to Tarboro, 42, 12. 

Black's Motor Express, D. J. Black, 209 S. Front St., Wilmington, N. C. 

Freight: Wilmington to Sanford via Delway, Clinton, Dunn, Lillington, 
and Jonesboro, 60, 53. 

Blizard and Banks Motor Express, R. A. Blizard and C. A. Banks, Mount 

Airy, N. C. 

Freight: Mount Airy to Greensboro via Winston-Salem and Kernersville, 
66, 60. 

Blue Bird Motor Transit Corporation, J. E. Clayton, Secretary-Treasurer, 

525 N. Cherry Street, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Freight: Winston-Salem to the North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destina- 
tion Richmond, Va., 65, 70. 



78 j^. C. CoRroKATioN Commission 

Boone Transfer Company, Spencer Miller, Boone, N. C. 

Freight: Boone to North Carolina-Tennessee State Line via Vilas and 
Zionville, destination Bristol, Virginia-Tennessee, 60; Zionville to North 
Carolina-Tennessee State Line via West Jefferson, Warrensville and Lansing, 
16 and County Highway. 

Bratcher, J. C, Beulaville, N. C. 

Freight: Beulaville to Kinston via Kenansville, 24, 11; Beulaville to Wil- 
mington, 41, 40 (without privilege of local work between Wallace and 
Wilmington.) 

Call Motor Company, W. W., Mrs. W. W. Call and Ira D. Payne, North 

Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Passenger: North V/ilkesboro to Statesville via Taylorsville, 16, 90. 

C. & S. Motor Express, E. F. Caudill, Secretary and Treasurer, North Wilkes- 
boro, N. C. 

Freight: North Wilkesboro to Winston-Salem via Yadkinville and Brooks 
Cross Roads, 60. 

Capital Coast Express Company, John W. Starling, Manager, Clayton, N. C. 
Freight: Raleigh to Kinston, 10; Kinston to Goldsboro via Snow Hill, 12, 
102. 

Carolina Coach Company, H. H. Hearn, General Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 
Passenger: Raleigh to Charlotte via Greensboro and Salisbury, 10, 15; 
Raleigh to Fayetteville via Lillington and Dunn, 21, 60, 22; Raleigh to 
North Carolina-Virginia State Line via Rocky Mount, Tarboro, Rich Square, 
Aulander, Winton, Gatesville, Sunbury and Corapeake, 90, 12, 305. 80; 
Greenville to Tarboro via Bethel, 11, 90; Zebulon to Wilson, 91; Durham 
to Chapel Hill, 75. 

Carolina Motor Express, R. E. Mabe, Spray, N. C. 

Freight: Draper to Greensboro via Leaksville, Spray and Reidsville, 709, 
65, 70; Leaksville to Stoneville via County Roads thence via 77 to Winston- 
Salem. 

Carolina-Norfolk Truck Line, J. M. Spence, President, 37 Nebraska Street, 

Norfolk, Va. 

Freight: Wilson to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination Nor- 
folk, Va., via Tarboro, Rich Square, Aulander, Winton, Gatesville, Sunbury 
and Corapeake, 42, 12, 305, 30. 

Carolina Scenic Coach Line, McD. Turner, 231 E. Main Street, Spartanburg, S. C. 
Passenger: Hendersonville to Tryon, 191; Elk Park to North Carolina- 
South Carolina State Line near Cliffside, 194, 19, 20, 207, via Newland, 
Woo-^lawn, Marion and Rutherfordton. 

Caudill's Express, H. D. & J. F. Caudill, Millers Creek, N. C. 

Freight: North Wilkesboro to Lansing via Jefferson and Warrensville, 16 
and county roads. 

Charlotte-Raleigh Bus Line, Incorporated, W. E. Smith, Secretary, Albe- 
marle, N. C. 

Passenger: Charlotte to Raleigh via Albemarle and Sanford, 27, 74, 75, 50. 

Chitty Transfer Company, T. D. Chitty, Murfreesboro, N. C. 

Freight: Murfreesboro to Littleton, 48; Weldon to Enfield, 40; Murfrees- 
boro to Woodland, 12; Woodland to Severn, County Road; Murfreesboro to 
North Carolina-Virginia State Line via Como, 12; Littleton to Oxford, 48, 
58, 50, 57, operation for that part of tlie route between Norlina and Oxford 
being limtied to shipments originating at or destined to points east of 
Norlina. 

Coastal Coach Lines, Incorporated, Norfolk Southern Bus Corporation, Agent, 

Norfolk, Va. 

Passenger: Elizabeth City to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination 
Norfolk, Va , via Camden, Sligo and Moyock, 34; Washington, N. C, to the 
North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination, Norfolk, Va., via Wil- 
liamston, Windsor, Edenton, Elizabeth City and South Mills. 

Collins, A. E., Maysville, N. C. 

Freight: New Bern to Wilmington, 30. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 79 

Cox & Eggleston, (John L. Cox, and B, H. Eggleston), Spray, N. C. 

Passenger: Leaksville-Spray, N. C, to North Carolina-Virginia State Liae 
on route to Fieldale, Va., 54. 

Danville and Durham Motor Express Line, J. A. Manooch, 726 Temple Avenue, 

Danville, Va. 
Freight: Durham to the North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination 
Danville, Va. via Highways Nos. 55, 48, 14 via Roxhoro and Leasburg; Spray 
to the North Carolina- Virginia State Line via Highways Nos. 709, 65, 70, via 
Reidsville; Spray to the North Carolina-Virginia State Line via the high- 
way following the Dan River. (Authority to pick up in Spray for Reids- 
ville or in Reidsville for Spray is not granted.) 

Davis, J. E., Rosemary, N. C. 

Freight: Rosemary, N. C. to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, via 
Weldon, Murfreesboro and Como, 48, 12. (Operation limited to interstate.) 

Dixie Motor Transit Line, D. M. Griffin, 3003 Dill Avenue, Richmond, Va. 
Passenger: Oxford to North Carolina-Virginia State Line via 75, destina- 
tion, Richmond, Va. 

East Coast Stages, Incorporated, H. Pierce Brawner, Vice President, Lenoir 

and Dawson Streets, Raleigh, N. C. 

Passenger: North Carolina-Virginia State Line to North Carolina-South 
Carolina State Line via Norlina, Raleigh, Goldsboro, Wilmington and 
Bolivia, 50, 10, 40, 20, 30; Durham to Wake Forest, 55; Rockingham to the 
North Carolina-South Carolina State Line, 50; Tin City to Wallace- 41. 

Eastern Motor Transport, Clarence Wyatt, 3 Shockoe Slip, Richmond, Va, 
Freight: Durham to the North Carolina-Virginia State Line, Highways Nos. 
75, 57, 50, via Oxford and Henderson without privilege of operation be- 
tween Durham and Oxford; Norlina to Warrenton, Highway No. 58. 

Edgerton Bus Lines, Incorporated^ B. E. Saunders, Secretary, 425 W. Wash- 
ington Street, Suffolk, Va. 

Passenger: Edenton to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination Suf- 
folk, Va., 32 and 30; Weldon to North Carolina-Virginia State Line via Jack- 
son and Murfreesboro, 48 and 12. 

Elizabeth City-Point Harbor Transportation Line, M. A. Aydlett, Grandy, N. C 
Freight: Elizabeth City to Point Harbor, via Camden, Shawboro, Sligo, 
Currituck and Jarvisburg, 34, 344; Sligo to North Carolina-Virginia State 
Line via Moyock, 34, 

E. T. and W. N. C. Motor Transportation Company^ J. E. Vance, Vice President, 

Johnson City, Tenn. 

Passenger: Asheville to North Carolina-Tennessee State Line, 20, 212; 
Asheville to North Carolina-Tennessee State Line, via Spruce Pine, Elk 
Park, etc., 20, 69; Cane River Post Office to State Line, 692. 
Freight: Swiss to North Carolina-Tennessee State Line, via Spruce Pine 
and Elk Park, 69; Spruce Pine to North Carolina-Tennessee State Line, via 
Bakersville, 19; Operation over Highways Nos. 692, 197, 104 from their 
junction with Highway No. 69 to their junction with Highway No. 19; 
Elk Park to Banner Elk, Highway No. 194; Cranberry to Cranberry via 
Newland, Linville, Pineola and Crossnore, 194, 181, 691, 194, 

Farmville Motor Express, David C. Best, Farmville, N. C. 

Freight: Tarboro, N. C, to Snow Hill, N. C, via Pine Tops, Fountain, and 
Farmville, 12. 

Farrar's Motor Express, 0. S. Farrar, Statesville, N. C. 

Freight: Statesville to North Wilkesboro, 90, 16; Taylorsville to Hickory^ 
via Conover, 16, 10; Statesville to Mount Airy, 26, 268, 80, via Brooks Cross 
Roads and Elkin; Taylorsville to Lenoir, 90; Lenoir to Moravian Falls, 18. 

Fleming's Motor X-Press, C. H. Fleming, Sanford, N. C. 
Freight: Sanford to Lillington, via Highway No. 60. 

Forbes, B. V., Wilson, N. C. 

Freight: Wilson to Kinston, via Stantonsburg and Snow Hill, County Road 
and Highway No. 12. f 



80 jN". C. Corporation Commission 

Fort Bragg Coach Company, C. F. Harris, Fayetteville, N. C. 

Passenger: Fayetteville to Fort Bragg, 53. (Leased to the Greenshoro- 
Fayetteville Bus Line.) 

Fredrickson Motor Express Corporation, Chas. H. Fredrickson, President, 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Freight: Charlotte to Greensboro, 15, 10; Lexington to Winston-Salem, 66; 
Charlotte to Statesville, 26; Charlotte to Lenoir, 27, 16, 10, 17; Charlotte 
to Asheville, via Shelby and Hendersonville, 20, 28, 69; Statesville to 
Winston-Salem, 90, 48; Salisbury to Asheville, via Statesville, 10; Shelby 
to Lincolnton, 206; Cherryville to Bessemer City, 274; Asheville to North 
Carolina-Tennessee State Line, via Marshall, Walnut, and Hot Springs, 20. 

Gardner's, Incorporated, H. R, Gardner, Wilmington, N. C. 
Freight: Wilmington to Carolina Beach, 40. 

Geringer, Hurley, New Bern, N. C. 

Freight: New Bern to Beaufort, 10; Beaufort to intersection of Highway 
101 with No. 10, near Havelock, 101; Beaufort to Atlantic, County Highway. 

Greeusboro-Fayetteville Bus Line, Incorporated, J. A, York, President, Ashe- 

boro, N. C. 

Passenger: Greensboro to Fayetteville, via Asheboro, Pinehurst, Southern 
Pines, Aberdeen and Raeford, 70, 75, 702, 50, 70, 24; Duham to Rockingham, 
via Sanford and Hamlet, 75, 50, 204, 20; Candor to Rockingham via Norman 
and EUerbe, 170, 75; Greensboro to Fayetteville, via Sanford, 60, 53; High 
Point to Asheboro, via Randleman, 77, 70; Asheboro to Siler City, via Ram- 
seur, 90, 

Griffin-Coppersmith Fuel Company, Incorporated; R, W. Coppersmith, Treas- 
urer; R. W. Griffin, Secretary, Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Freight: Elizabeth City to Wanchese, via Camden, Currituck, Kitty Hawk, 
and Nag's Head, 34, 344, 345. 

Habit Brothers, John and Joe Habit, Edenton, N. C. 

Freight: Washington to North Carolina-Virginia State Line via Williamston, 
Windsor, Edenton, Elizabeth City and South Mills, 30, 342, 34, 341; Williams- 
ton to Washington, 30; Washington to New Bern, 30 and over Highway 
10 for interstate haul between New Bern and Beaufort, via Morehead 
City; Elizabeth City to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, via Sligo and 
Moyock; 34. 

Hampton Roads Transportation Company, J. L. Wright, 912 Water Street, 

Norfolk, Va. 

Freight: Elizabeth to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, via Moyock, 
34; Elizabeth City to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, via South Mills, 
34, 341. 

Hardy, J. W., Farmville, N. C. 

. Freight: Wilson to Farmville, 91. 

H. and L. Motor Express Company, G. C. Morton, President, Albemarle, N. C. 
Freight: Charlotte to Sanford, via Albemarle, Badin, Mount Gilead, and 
Troy, 27, 740, 74, 515, 51, 74, 75, 50; High Point to Denton, via Asheboro, Biscoe 
and Troy, 77, 70, 74, 109; Asheboro to Albemarle, via New London, 62, 80. 

Helms Motor Express, Mrs. Carl L. Helms, Administratrix Estate of Carl 

L. Helms, Albemarle, N. C. 

Freight: Raleigh to Charlotte, via Sanford, Carthage, Biscoe, etc., 10, 50, 75, 
74, 109, 515, 74, 27; Albemarle to Salisbury, 80; Durham to Aberdeen, via 
Sanford, 75, 50; Aberdeen to Pinehurst, 70; Pinehurst to Southern Pines, 702. 

Henderscnville-Asheville Motor Express Company, R. F. Styron, Henderson- 
ville, N. C. 

Freight: Asheville to Hendersonville, 69; Hendersonville to Rosman, via 
Brevard, 28. 

Hendersonville Bus Company, J. M. Brooks, Hendersonville, N. C. 

Passenger: Asheville to Highlands, via Hendersonville and Brevard, 69, 28. 
(Operation beyond Brevard to be opened gradually as road conditions 
will permit.) 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 81 

Hoffler & Boney Transfer Company, Willard Hoffler, G. E. Boney, Wallace, N. C. 
Freight: Wallace to Warsaw, county road; Tin City to Harrell's Store, 41; 
Warsaw to Swansboro, via Jacksonville, 24. 

Hollingsworth, T. C, Warsaw, N, C. 

Freight: Warsaw to Goldsboro, via Clinton and Newton Grove, 24, 23, 102. 

H. Hunt & Company, H. Hunt, Owner, Elizabethtown, N. C. 

Freight: Wilmington to Fayetteville, via Elizabethtown, 20, 21; Elizabeth- 
town to Lumberton, via Clarkton and Bladenboro, 23, 211; Fayetteville to 
Lumberton, 22. 

Independence Bus Company, R. J. Rudolph, and T. W. Wingate, Independence, 

Va. 

Passenger: Elkin to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, via Sparta, 26, 
destination Wytheville, Va. 

Jack-Rabbit Motor Express, Incorporated, W. L. Massie, President; P. W. 

Ferguson, Secretary and Treasurer, Asheville, N. C. 

Freight: Asheville to North Carolina-Georgia State Line, destination At- 
lanta, Ga., via Waynesville, Sylva and Franklin, 10, 285, without privilege 
of local operation on that part of road between Asheville and Waynesville; 
Sylva to Murphy, 10. 

Johnson Transit Company, Earl McD, Westbrook, Secretary, Dunn, N. C. 

Freight: Dunn to Wilmington, via Clinton, 60, 40, without privilege of local 
operation Clinton to Wilmington and intermediate points. 

Kinston-Richlands Transfer Company, Carl C. Cox, Box 463, New Bern, N. C. 
Freight: Jacksonville to Trenton, via Kenansville and Kinston, 24, 11, 12; 
Trenton to Richlands, via Comfort, 41, 121. 

LaFayette Transit Company, Incorporated, R. H. Barbour, Treasurer, 

Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Freight: Raleigh to Fayetteville, via Varina and Lillington, 21; Cardenas 
to Fayetteville, 55, 60, 22, via Angier, Coats, Erwin, Dunn and Godwin; New 
Bern to Kinston via Polloksvilie and Trenton, 30, 12; New Bern to Raleigh, 
via Kinston and Goldsboro, 10; Goldsboro to Rocky Mount, 40; Rocky 
Mount to Williamston, 90; Kinston to Bethel, 11; Kinston to Farmville via 
Snow Hill, 12; Wilson to V/ashington, 91; New Bern to Beaufort, 10, 101. 
(Amended to include contract shipments to and from the towns of Benson, 
Bowdens, Calypso, Clinton, Deep Run, Dunn, Faison, Four Oaks, Mount Olive, 
Pink Hill, Warsaw, and Wilmington, and from points on lines authorized 
to the North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination Norfolk, Va.) 

Leaksville-Danville Bus Line, J. C. Gilkey, Spray, N. C. 

Passenger: Leaksville to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination 
Danville, Va. 

Leaksville-Reidsville Bus Line, Eugene Wilson, A. W. Foley, Spray, N. C. 
Passenger: Leaksville-Spray to Reidsville, 54, 65. 

Leigh & Durham, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Freight: Durham to Chapel Hill, 75. 

M. and S. Transfer and Storage Com-pany, George T. Musselman, 304 Nutt 

Street, Wilmington, N. C. 

Freight: Wilmington to Southport, via Town Creek, Supply and Bolivia, 
30, 130. 

"Miller Motor Express, W. W. Miller, Jr., 314 N. Caldwell Street, Charlotte, N. C. 
Freight: Charlotte to Hamlet, via Monroe, Wadesboro and Rockingham, 20; 
Charlotte to North Carolina-South Carolina State Line, 26, 261, destination 
Fort Mill, Rock Hill and Chester, S. C; Laurinburg to Fayetteville, via 
Raeford, 24; Fayetteville to Lumberton, 22; Lumberton to Wilmington, via 
Bolton, 211, 20, without privilege of local operation on Highway 20 between 
Bolton and Wilmington. 

Miller, S. H. & Son, Canton, N. C. 

Freight: Asheville to Waynesville, via Canton, Highway No. 10. 

Morgan, G. B., Corapeake, N. C. 

Freight: Hertford to North Carolina- Virginia State Line near Corapeake, 
via Winfall, Gliden and Sunbury, 342, 321, 32, 30. 



82 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Motor Express Company, H, S. Reid, President, Fincastle, Va. 

Freight: Winston-Salem to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, Highway 
77, destination Roanoke, Va. 

Motor Transit Company, R. S. Koonce and M. B. Koonce, 324 W. Lane Street, 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Freight: Raleigh to Greensboro, 10; Greensboro to Fayetteville, via Sanford, 
60, 53; Greensboro to Fayetteville, via Asheboro, Biscoe, Candor, Eagle 
Springs, Pinehurst, Southern Pines, Aberdeen and Raeford, 70, 75, 702, 50, 
70, 24; Asheboro to Ramseur, 90. 

Murrell's Express, Z. E. Murrell, Jr., Jacksonville, N. C. 
Freight: Jacksonville to Wilmington, 30. 

Parramore Truck Line, T. C, J. H., and J. M. Parramore, Winton, N. C. 

Freight: Kinston to Farmville, 12; Farmville to Greenville, 91; Greenville 
to Bethel, 11; Bethel to Williamston, 90; Wiliamston to North Carolina- 
Virginia State Line, 30, via Windsor, Aulander and Winton, destination 
Norfolk, Va.; Winton to Aulander, 30; Aulander to Rich Square, 305; Rich 
Square to Scotland Neck, 12; Scotland Neck to Windsor, via Roxobel, Kel- 
ford and Lewiston, county road. (Operation of the above route is for tlie 
purpose of transporting freight delivered to and received from the Norfolk, 
Baltimore and Carolina Lines at Winton.) (Authority is granted to trans- 
port oils, greases and peanuts interstate, and tobacco both interstate and 
intrastate.) 

Piedmont Motor Express, Incorporated, H. C. Mims, President, Greenville, S. C. 
Freight: Charlotte to North Carolina-South Carolina State Line, 20, 205, 
via Gastonia, Kings Mountain and Grover; Asheville to North Carolina- 
South Carolina State Line, 69. (Without privilege of intrastate operation 
between Asheville and Hendersonville) ; Rutherfordton to North Carolina- 
South Carolina State Line, 20, 207, via Forest City, Caroleen and Cliffside. 

Pierce & Formy Duval, Incorporated, F. L. Formy Duval, President, Lake 

Waccamaw, N. C. 

Freight: Wilmington to Hamlet, 20; Boardman to Lumberton via Fair* 
mont, 72, 70; Lumberton to Raeford, via Red Springs, 70. 

Powell, A. T., Colerain, N. C. 

Freight: Colerain Wharf to Aulander, via Colerain, Trapp, Powellsville 
and Hexalena. 

Queen City Coach Company, Incorporated, L. A. Love, Manager, Charlotte, N. C. 
Passenger: Wilmington to Asheville, via Lumberton, Charlotte and Ruth- 
erfordton, 20; Fayetteville to North Carolina-South Carolina State Line 
via St. Pauls,* Lumberton and Rowland, 22; Kings Mountain to North 
Carolina-South Carolina State Line near Grover, 205; Gastonia to Cherry- 
ville, county highways; Charlotte to Asheville, via Lincolnton, Newton and 
Marion, 27, 16, 10; Marion to Bakersville, via Spruce Pine, 19; Bat Cave 
to Hendersonville, 28 ; Murphy to North Carolina-South Carolina State Line, 
10; Charlotte to Gastonia route is understood to include operation via 
20 and also the old highway via Belmont, McAdenville, Lowell and Ranlo. 

Queen City Lines, Incorporated, L. A. Love, Secretary and Treasurer, 417 West 

Fifth Street, Charlotte, N. C. 

Passenger: Asheville to Murphy, via Waynesville and Bryson City, 10; 
Dillsboro to North Carolina-Georgia State Line, via Franklin and Otto, 285; 
Asheville to Enka, county roads; Kings Mountain to the North Carolina- 
South Carolina State Line near Grover, 205; Charlotte to Kings Mountain, 
20, and also old highway via Belmont, McAdenville, Lowell and Ranlo. 

Raleigh-Danville Motor Express, C. S. Manooch, 514 E. Davie Street, Raleigh» 

N. C. 

Freight: Raleigh to Durham, via Henderson and Oxford, 50, 57, 75. 

Rocky Mount-Norfolk Truck Line, 37 Nebraska Street, Norfolk, Va. 

Freight: Rocky Mount to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, 40, 48, 12, via 
Weldon, Murfreesboro and Como. (For interstate operation only.) 
Scales Company and Kittrell, Incorporated, Robersonville, N. C. 
Freight: Greenville to Robersonville, via Bethel, 11, 90. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 83 

Seashore Transportation Company, James M. West, President, New Bern, N. C. 
Passenger: Washington to Wilmington, via New Bern, 30; Goldsboro to 
Beaufort, via Kinston and New Bern, 10; Kinston to Polloksville via Tren- 
ton, 12; Beaufort to Atlantic, unnumbered highway; Goldsboro to Rocky 
Mount, via Wilson, 40. 

Shore, W. W., Boone, N. C. 

Passenger and Freight: North Wilkesboro to Boone, 60 (with authority 
to operate temporarily over Highways 69, 68„ via West Jefferson, pending 
completion of work on Route 60.) 

Skinner-Ussery Transfer Company, Wade Skinner, and R. H. Ussery, Mount 

Gilead, N. C. 

Freight: Mount Gilead to Rockingham via Ellerbe, 51, 75; Rockingham to 
Aberdeen, 50; Aberdeen to Biscoe, via Pinehurst, West End and Candor, 
70, 75; Biscoe to Wadeville, via Troy, 74; Wadeville to Mount Gilead, 51; 
Candor to West End, via Norman and Jackson Springs, 170, 75. (That part 
of above route between Biscoe and Mount Gilead on Highways 74 and 51 
is intended to convey road rights only without privilege of local operation 
on that part of the route.) 

Skyland Stages, Incorporated, L. R. Gibbons, Assistant Treasurer, Asheville, 

N. C. 

Passenger: Asheville to North Carolina-Tennessee State Line, 20, destina- 
tion, Newport, Tenn.; Hendersonville to North Carolina-South Carolina 
State Line at Chestnut Springs, on route to Greenville, S. C, 69; Asheville 
to Oteen, 10. 

Smith's Transfer Company, C. H. and V. J. Smith, Lenoir, N. C. 

Freight: Hickory to Boone, via Lenoir and Blowing Rock, 17; Lenoir to 
Asheville, 18, 10; Blowing Rock to the North Carolina-Tennessee State 
Line, via Linville, Cranberry and Elk Park, 691, 181, 69; Boone to Elk Park, 
via Vilas and Banner Elk, 194. 

Southerland Brothers, A. D. Southerland and N. M. Southerland, Golds- 
boro, N. C. 

Freight: Goldsboro to Washington, via Kinston and Greenville, 10, 11, 
91, 30. 

Southern Passenger Motor Lines, Inc., C. W. Falwell, Jr., President, Lynch- 
burg, Va. 

Passenger: Durham, N. C, to the North Carolina- Virginia State Line, via 
Roxboro, 55; Roxboro, N. C, to the North Carolina-Virginia State Line, via 
Semora, Milton, Yanceyville, 57, 62, 14 . 

Stallings Transfer Service, M. L. Stallings, Spring Hope, N. C. 
Freight: Raleigh to Rocky Mount, 90; Zebulon to Rocky Mount, via Wilson, 
91, 40; Rocky Mount to Williamston to Washington, 90, 30; Washington 
to Wilson, via Greenville and Farmville, 91. 

Statesville-Salisbury Coach Company, P. A. Griffin, Manager, Hickory, N. C. 
Passenger: Salisbury to Newton, via Statesville and Catawba, 10; Conover 
to intersection of lOA with 10, near Catawba, lOA; Hickory to Boone via 
Lenoir and Blowing Rock, 17; Morganton to North Wilkesboro, via Lenoir, 
18, 16. 

Stiles Transfer Company, Incorporated, J. P. and S. D. Stiles, Murphy, N. C. 
Freight: Asheville to Murphy, 10, without privilege of operation between 
Asheville and Sylva. 

L. Taylor & Son, L. E. Taylor, Secretary, Faison, N. C. 
Freight: Faison to Wilmington, 40. 

Tri-City Motor Express Line, I. M. Lassiter, High Point, N. C: 
Freight: Greensboro to Winston-Salem, via High Point, 10, 77. 

Triplett, B. C, Kerr, N. C. 

Freight: Harrell's Store to White Lake, 411; White Lake to Atkinson via 
Kelly, 201; Atkinson to Harrell's Store, via Ivanhoe, county roads. 

Vinson, I. L., Autryville, N. C. 

Freight: Fayetteville to Wilmington, via Clinton, 24, 60, 40, without privi- 
lege of local operation between Clinton and Wilmington. 



84 . Iv. C. CoBPORATioN Commission 

Virginia Dare Transportation Company, R. B. Etheridge and G. H. Lennon, 

Manteo, N. C. 

Passenger: Manteo to Elizabeth City, via Nag's Head, Kill Devil Hill and 
Currituck Bridge, 345, 344, 34; Manteo to Wanchese, 345. 
Freight: Manteo to Norfolk, 345, 344, 34, via Kill Devil Hill, Sligo and 
Moyock; Manteo to Wanchese, 345. 

Virginia-Southern Coach Lines, J. M. Evans, Richmond, Va. 

Passenger: Weldon, N. C, to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, 40. (For 
interstate traffic only.) Weldon to Rocky Mount, 40. (For intrastate and 
interstate operation.) 

Walker Transportation Service, Tildon Walker, Fayetteville, N. C. 
Freight: Fayetteville to Laurinburg, via Raeford, 24. 

Welfare & Beland, W. F. Welfare and O. B. Beland, Wilson, N. C. 

Freight: Wilson to Fayetteville, 40, 22; Goldsboro, N. C, to North Carolina- 
Virginia State Line via Wilson, Rocky Mount, and Roanoke Rapids, 40, 481. 

Whedbee Transfer Company, W. F. Whedbee, Ahoskie, N. C. 

Freight: Ahoskie to Windsor, via Powellsville, county road and 30; Wind- 
sor to Eden House Point, 342; Eden House Point to Ahoskie, via Colerain, 
Harrellsville, and Cofield, 35 and county roads. 

White, P. G., Roduco, N. C. 

Freight: Roduco to North Carolina-Virginia State Line via Sunbury, 30; 
Elizabeth City to Sunbury, 34; Sunbury to Edenton, 32; North Carolina- 
Virginia State Line near Gates, via County Highway into Gatesville, thence 
via Highway 321 to its intersection with Highway No. 32. 

Wilmington-Brunswick and Southern Railroad Company, H. M. Shannon, Man- 
ager, Southport, N. C. 

Passenger: Southport, over route 201, nine miles to Wilse Smith's; thence 
over county road to Bolivia; thence on route 201 to the Brunswick River; 
thence over route 20 into Wilmington. 

Winston-Elkin Motor Express, V. L. Renegar, Elkin, N. C. 

Freight: Winston-Salem to Elkin, 60, 26, via Yadkinville, Boonville and 
Brooks Cross Roads; Winston-Salem to Elkin, via East Bend and Boon- 
ville, 60, 67, 26; Elkin to Roaring Gap, 26, for seasonal service. 

Wolfe Transportation Company, H. H. Wolfe, President, P. O. Box 238, 

Monroe, N. C. 

Freight: Monroe to Concord, 151. 

Wright, Joel W., Trading as Inter-Carolinas Motor Bus Company, Gastonia, 

N. C. 

Passenger: Charlotte to North Carolina-South Carolina State Line, destina- 
tion, York, S. C, 15; Lincolnton to North Carolina-South Carolina State 
Line, via Gastonia, 16. (Entire operation is leased to Queen City Coach 
Company.) 

Yadkin Coach Company, George H. Dugan, Salisbury, N. C. 

Passenger: Salisbury to Norwood, via Albemarle, 80; Albemarle to Badin,. 
county highways. 



ELECTRIC LIGHT, GAS AND POWER COMPANIES 

RULES REGULATING THE OPERATIONS AND STANDARD OF SERVICE 
OP ELECTRIC LIGHT AND POWER COMPANIES IN NORTH CAROLINA 

General Provisions 
Rule, 1. Authorization of Rules. 

Section 1054, Sub-Section I, Consolidated Statutes 1919 provides that the 
Corporation Commission shall be empowered to establish rules and fix stand- 
ards for electric service as follows: 

The Corporation Commission shall make reasonable and just rules and 
regulations to prevent discrimination in the transportation of freight 
or passengers, or in furnishing electricity, electric light, current, power 
or gas. 

In accordance with the above provision, the Corporation Commission has 
adopted the following rules and affixed the following standards for electric 
service, to become effective the first day of November, 1931. All previous 
rules or standards conflicting with those contained herein are hereby super- 
seded. 

The adoption of these rules shall in no way preclude the Corporation Com- 
mission from altering or amending them in whole or in part, or from requir- 
ing any other or additional service, equipment, facility, or standard, either 
upon complaint or upon its own motion, or upon the application of any utility. 
Furthermore, these rules shall not in any way relieve any utility from any 
of its duties under the laws of this State. 
Rule 2. Application of Rules. 

(a) These rules shall apply to any person, firm, or corporation (except 
municipalities, or agents thereof) which is now or may hereafter become 
engaged as a public utility in the business of furnishing electric current for 
domestic, commercial or industrial consumers within the State of North 
Carolina. 

(b) The rules are intended to define good practice which can normally 
be expected. They are intended to insure adequate service and to protect the 
public from unfair practices and the utilities from unreasonable demands. 
The cooperation of the utilities with the Commission is presupposed. 

(c) In any case where compliance with any of these rules introduces 
unusual difficulty, such rule may be temporarily waived by the Commission 
upon application of the utility. If in such case compliance with the rule 
would cost more than the results of such compliance are worth to the public 
and consumers of electric current, it may be permanently set aside by the 
Commission. 

Rule 3. Definitions. 

In the interpretation of these rules the word "Commission" shall be taken 
to mean the North Carolina Corporation Commission; the word "utility" 
shall be taken to mean any person, firm or corporation (except a municipality 
or agent thereof) engaged in the business of supplying electric current to 
domestic, commercial, or industrial users within this State; and the word 



86 JN". C. CoKPORATioN Commission 

"Consumer" shall be taken to mean any person, firm, corporation, municipality, 
or other political subdivision of the State supplied by any such utility. 

Rule 4. Records. 

(a) A complete record shall be kept of all tests and inspections required 
under these rules as to the quality or condition of service which is rendered. 

(b) All records of tests shall contain complete information concerning 
the test, including the date, hour, and place where the test was made; the 
name of the person making the test, and the result. 

All records required by these rules shall be preserved by the utility for 
at least one year after they are made. Such records shall be kept within 
the State at the office or offices of the utility, and shall be open for examination 
by the Commission or its representatives at all reasonable hours. 

Rule 5. Reports to Commission. 

Each utility shall, at such times and in such form as the Commission shall 
prescribe, report to the Commission the results of all tests required to be 
made or the information contained in any records required to be kept by the 
utility. 

Gbneeal Service Provisions 

Rule 6. Inspection of Plant and Equipment. 

(a) Each utility shall maintain its plant, distribution system and facil- 
ities at all times in proper condition for use in rendering safe and adequate 
service. 

(b) Each utility shall, upon request of the Commission, file with the 
Commission a statement regarding the condition and adequacy of its plant, 
equipment, facilities and service in such form as the Commission may require. 

Rule 7. Complaints. 

Each utility shall make a full and prompt investigation of all service com- 
plaints made to it by its consumers, either directly or through the Commis- 
sion. It shall keep a record of all such complaints received which record 
shall show the name and address of the complainant, the date and character 
of the complaint and the adjustment or disposal made thereof. Such record 
shall be kept for a period of one year. 

Rule 8. Information for Consumers. 

Each utility shall upon request inform its consumers as to the method of 
reading meters. It is recommended that an exhibition meter be kept on dis- 
play in each office maintained by a utility. 

Rule 9. Meter Readings and Bill Forms. 

Bills shall be rendered for metered service periodically, and shall show the 
readings of the meter at the beginning and end of the period for which the 
bill is rendered, the number and kinds of units of service supplied, and the 
date of the last meter reading. 

Each bill shall bear upon its face the date when the bill was mailed, or 
left at the premises of the consumer, or the latest date on wnich it may be 
paid without loss of discount or incurring of penalty. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 87 

Metebs, Meter Tests and Records 
Rule 10. Location. 

(a) No consumer's meter shall be Installed in any location where it may- 
be unreasonably exposed to heat, cold, dampness or other cause of damage, 
or in any unduly dirty or inaccessible location. 

(b) Meters should not be placed in coal or wood bins or on partitions form- 
ing such bins, or on any unstable supports subject to vibration. 

(c) Meters should be easily accessible for reading, testing, and making 
necessary adjustments and repairs. When several meters are placed on one 
meter board the distance between centers should not, where practicable, be 
less than 15 inches, and each "house" loop should be tagged or marked to 
indicate the circuit metered. 

(d) Each customer shall provide a suitable and convenient place for the 
location of meters, where they will be readily accessible at any reasonable 
hour for the purpose of reading, testing, repairing, etc., and such other ap- 
pliances owned by the utility and placed on the premises of the consumer 
shall be so placed as to be readily accessible at such times as are necessary, 
and the authorized agent of the utility shall have authority to visit such 
meters and appurtenances at such times as are necessary in the conduct of 
the business of the utility. 

Rule 11. Testing Facilities. 

(a) Each utility furnishing metered electric service shall, unless speci- 
fically excused by the Commission, provide and have available such meter 
laboratory, standard meters, instruments and facilities as may be necessary 
to make the tests required by these rules, together with such portable indicat- 
ing electrical testing instruments, watt hour meters, and facilities of suitable 
type and range for testing service watt hour meters, voltmeters and other 
electrical equipment, used in its operations, as may be deemed necessary and 
satisfactory to the Commission. 

(b) All portable indicating electrical testing instruments such as volt- 
meters, ammeters and watt hour meters, when in regular use for testing pur- 
poses, shall be checked against suitable reference standards periodically, and 
with such frequency as to insure their accuracy whenever used in testing 
service meters of the utility. 

Rule 12. Method of Determining Average Error of Meters. 

In determining the average error of a watt hour meter, the following pro- 
cedure is recommended : 

(a) All meters whenever possible, shall be tested at the following three 
loads: one-tenth of the current rating of the meter, normal load, and at rating. 

(b) The average of these tests obtained by multiplying the results of the 
test at normal load by 3 (three) adding the results of the tests at one-tenth 
rating and at the current rating, and dividing the total by five, shall be deemed 
the condition of the meter. 

(c) In an installation where it is impossible to obtain a load of ten per 
cent (10%) of the rating, or one hundred per cent (100%) of the rating of 
the meter, tests shall be made at the nearest obtainable loads to ten per cent 



88 N. C. CoEPORATioN Commission 

(10%) and one hundred per cent (100%) of the rating of the meter and the 
values given in the ratios as stated above. 

To determine normal load, use the percentage of connected load indicated 
below for the class of service metered. 

Percentage of 
Class of Service Metered Connected Load 

Residence and Apartment Lighting 40% 

Elevator Service 40% 

Factories (Individual Drive) Churches and Offices 45% 

Factories (Shaft Drive), Theatres, Clubs, Entrances, Hallways, 

and General Store Lighting 60% 

Restaurants, Pumps, Air Compressors, Ice Machines and Mov- 
ing Picture Theatres 70% 

Signs and Window Lighting and Blowers 100% 

When a meter is connected to an installation consisting of two or more of 
the above classes of load, the normal load would be the sum of the normal 
loads for each class. 

Rule 13. Meter Accuracy. 

(a) Creeping. No watt hour meter which registers on "no load" when 
the applied voltage is less than one hundred and ten per cent (110%) of 
standard service voltage shall be placed in service or allowed to remain in 
service. 

(b) Initial Accuracy Requirements. No watt hour meter shall he placed 
in service which is in any way mechanically defective, or which has incor- 
rect constants, nor shall any watt hour meter be maintained in service which 
is not adjusted to meet the following requirements: 

Average error not over 2% plus or minus; 
Error at heavy load not over 2% plus or minus; 
Error at light load not over 4% plus or minus; 

(c) Adjustment after Test. Whenever a test made by the utility or by 
the Commission on a service watt hour meter connected in its permanent 
position in place of service shows that the average error is greater than that 
specified above, the meter shall be adjusted to bring the average error within 
the specified limits. 

(d) Allowable Error. A service watt hour meter having an average error 
of not more than 4% plus or minus, may be considered as correct, and no 
adjustment of charges shall be entailed by such an error. 

Rule 14. Periodic Tests of Meters. 

Each watt hour meter shall be tested according to the following schedule, 
while connected, if practical, in its permanent position in place of service. 

(a) Two and three wire commutating type and mercury type meters, up 
to and including 50 amperes rated capacity of meter element shall be tested 
at least once every 18 months. 

(b) Two and three wire commutating type and mercury type meters of 
over 50 amperes rated capacity of meter element, shall be tested at least once 
every 12 months. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 89 

(c) Two and thre wire single phase induction type meters, up to and 
including 25 amperes rated capacity of meter element, shall be tested at least 
once every 60 months. 

(d) Two and three wire single phase induction type meters of over 25 
amperes rated capacity of meter element, shall be tested at least every 60 
months. 

(e) Self contained polyphase meters, up to and including 50 K. W. rated 
capacity, shall be tested at least once every 36 months. 

(f) Self contained polyphase meters of over 50 K. W. rated capacity, shall 
be tested at least once every 36 months. 

(g) Polyphase meters, connected through current transformers or current 
and potential transformers, to circuits up to and including 50 K. W. rated 
capacity, shall be tested at least once every 6 months. 

(h) Polyphase meters, connected through current transformers or current 
and potential transformers, to circuits of over 50 K. W. rated capacity, shall 
be tested at least once every 6 months. 

Rule 15. Meter Testing on Request of Consumers. 

(a) Each utility shall, at any time (when requested in writing by a con- 
sumer) upon reasonable notice, test the accuracy of the meter in use by him. 

No deposit or payment shall be required from the consumer for such meter 
test except when a consumer requests a meter test within six months after 
date of the installation or the last previous test of this meter, in which case 
he shall be required by the utility to deposit with it, to cover the reasonable 
cost of such test, an amount not to exceed the following: 

(1) For direct current and single phase meters operating on 

600 volts or less, up to and including 25 amperes rated 
capacity of the meter element $ 1.50 

(2) For each additional 50 amperes or fraction thereof 50 

(3) For single phase meters above 600 volts, and for polyphase 

meters, with or without instrument transformers, up to 

and including 25 K. W. rated capacity of the circuit 12.50 

(4) For each additional 25 K. W. rated capacity or fraction 

thereof 2.50 

Special rates for meters not included in above classification or so located 
that the cost is out of proportion to the fee specified, may be approved by the 
Commission upon application and upon receipt of complete specifications. 

(b) The amount so deposited with the utility shall be refunded or cred- 
ited to the consumer, (as a part of the settlement in the case .of a disputed 
account) if the meter is found, when tested, to register more than 4% fast, 
otherwise the deposit shall be retained by the utility. 

(c) The consumer shall, if he so requests, be present when the utility 
conducts the test on his meter, or, if he desires, may provide (at his expense) 
an expert or other representative appointed by him. 

(d) A report giving the name of the consumer requesting the test, the 
date of the request, the location of the premises where the meter has been 
installed, the type, make, size and serial number of the meter, the date of 
removal, the date tested, and the result of the test, shall be supplied to such 
consumer within a reasonable time after the completion of the test. 



90 ]Sr. C. CoRPOKATioN Commission 

Rule 16. Adjustment of Bills for Meter Error. 

(a) Fast meters. If on test of any electric meter, whether at the request 
of a consumer or not, it is found to be more than 4 per cent fast, the utility 
shall refund to the consumer such percentage of the amount of his bills for 
the period of 60 days, just previous to the removal of such meter from service, 
or, for the time the meter was in service, not exceeding 60 days, as the meter 
shall have been shown to be in error by such test in excess of 4 per cent. 
Provided, however, that if the error was due to some cause, the date of 
which can be fixed, and which date is within the 60 days' period, herein men- 
tioned, the overcharge shall be computed back to, but not beyond, such time. 
No part of any minimum service charge shall be refunded. 

(b) Slow meters. If on test of any electric meter made by the utility 
under Rules 14 and 15, whether at the request of a consumer or not, it be 
found more than 4 per cent slow, the utility may collect from the consumer 
the amount estimated to be due from the consumer for electricity used but 
not charged for in bills rendered, not to exceed the sixty days previous to 
removal of the meter. 

Operation 
Rule 17. Standard Frequency. 

Each utility supplying alternating current, shall adopt a standard fre- 
quency, the suitability of which may be determined by the Commission, and 
shall maintain this frequency within 2 per cent plus or minus of standard at 
all times during which service is supplied; provided, however, that momentary 
variations of frequency of more than 5 per cent, which are clearly due to no 
lack of proper equipment or reasonable care on the part of the utility, shall 
not be construed as a violation of this rule. 

Rule 18. Standard Voltage. 

Each utility shall adopt standard average voltages for its different classes 
of constant voltage service. The voltage maintained at the utility mains 
shall at all times be reasonably constant, and the variations in voltage from 
the average shall in no case exceed the limitations as prescribed by good 
practice for such classes of service. 

For service rendered for lighting purposes plus or minus variations from 
the standard adopted, should not exceed 6 per cent for service rendered for 
power, or primarily for power purposes, the voltage variations should not 
exceed 10 per cent above or below the standard average voltage. 

A greater variation of voltage than specified above may be allowed when 
service is supplied directly from the transmission line, or in a limited or 
extended area where consumers are widely scattered, and the business done 
does not justify close voltage regulation. In such cases the best voltage 
regulation should be provided that is practicable under the circumstances. 

Variations in the voltage in excess of those specified, caused by the oper- 
ation of power apparatus on consumer's premises, which necessarily require 
large starting current, by the action of the elements, and by infrequent and 
unavoidable fluctuations of short duration due to station operation, shall not 
be construed a violation of this rule. 

Consumers shall select, install, maintain and operate their electrical equip- 
ment so as to cause the least interference with the regulation of the local 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 91 

light and power system. Squirrel cage induction motors in excess of 20 
H.P. must not be installed without the consent of the utility furnishing 
service. 

Rule 19. Voltage Surveys and Records. 

Each utility shall provide itself with suitable indicating or recording volt- 
meters, and shall make a sufficient number of voltage tests periodically so 
as to insure compliance with the voltage requirements cited above. These 
tests shall be made at appropriate points upon the utility's distribution lines. 

Rule 20. Deposits Prom Consumers and Guarantee Payment of Bills. 

(a) Each utility may require from any consumer or prospective consumer 
a deposit intended to guarantee payment of current bills. Such required 
deposit shall not exceed the amount of an estimated ninety days' bill of such 
consumer. Interest shall be paid by the utility upon such deposits at the rate 
of 6 per cent per annum, payable upon the return of the deposit', for the time 
such deposit was held by the utility and the consumer was served by the 
utility, provided such period was not less than six months, in which case no 
interest shall be paid. 

(b) Each utility having on hand deposits from consumers or hereafter 
receiving deposits from them, shall keep records to show: 

(1) The name of each consumer making such deposit, (2) the premises 
occupied by the consumer when the deposit was made, (3) the amount and 
date of making the deposit, and (4) a record of each transaction concerning 
such deposit such as payment of interest, interest credited, etc. 

(c) Each utility shall issue to every consumer from whom a deposit is 
received a non-assignable receipt. 

(d) Each utility shall provide reasonable ways and means whereby a 
depositor who makes application for the return of his deposit or any balance 
to which he is entitled, but is unable to produce the original certificate of 
deposit or receipt, may not be deprived of his deposit or balance. 

Rule 21. Discontinuance of Service for Violation of Rules or Non-Payment 
OF Bills. 

(a) No utility shall discontinue the service to any consumer for violation 
of its rules or regulations, or for non-payment of bills without having first 
tried to induce the consumer to comply with its rules and regulations or to 
pay his bills. 

Service shall actually be discontinued only after at least 24 hours' written 
notice of such intention shall have been given to the consumer by the utility; 
provided, however, that where fraudulent use of current is detected, or where 
a dangerous condition is found to exist on the consumer's premises, the 
service may be shut off without notice in advance. 

Said notice herein prescribed may be given by leaving a copy thereof with 
such consumer at the premises where such service is rendered, or by mailing 
same through the United States mail to the consumer's last known postoffice 
address. 

Consumer shall have the privilege of paying delinquent bill at any time 
prior to actual disconnection of service lines supplying him; provided, that 



92 N". C. Corporation Commission 

where the utility dispatches an employee to the premises of any consumer 
for the purpose of disconnecting service lines, a fee not to exceed one dollar 
may be added to consumer's delinquent bill to cover cost to utility of dispatch- 
ing such employee to consumer's premises, which fee must be paid as a part 
of consumer's delinquent account. 

(b) Whenever the service is turned off for violation of rules or regula- 
tions, or fraudulent use of current, the utility may make a reasonable charge 
for the cost of renewing it. 

(c) Where a consumer has been required to make a guarantee de- 
posit this shall not relieve consumer of the obligation to pay the service 
bills when due, but where such deposit has been made and service has 
been discontinued on account of non-payment of bill, then in such event 
unless consumer shall, within forty-eight hours after service has been 
discontinued, apply for reconnection of service and pay the account, then 
in such event the utility shall apply the deposit of such consumer toward 
the discharge of such account and shall as soon thereafter as practicable, 
refund the consumer any excess of the deposit. 

Rule 22. Replacement of Metees and Changes in Location of Service. 

(a) Whenever a consumer requests the replacement of the service meter 
on his premises, such request shall be treated as a request for the test of such 
meter, and as such, shall fall under the provisions of Rule 15. 

(b) Whenever a consumer moves from the location where current is used 
by him, and thereby requires the disconnecting and/or connecting at a 
new location of the electric supply, and the same work has been done for him 
within one year preceding, the utility may make a charge, subject to such 
charge having been approved by the Commission. 

Rule 23. Utility May Withhold Service Until Customer Complies With 
Rules and Regulations. 
Any utility may decline to serve a customer or prospective customer until 
he has complied with the State and municipal regulations on electric service, 
and the rules and regulations of the utility furnishing the service, provided 
such rules and regulations have been approved by the Commission. 

Rule 24. Extent of System on Which Utility Must Maintain Service. 

Each electric utility, unless specifically relieved in any case by the Com- 
mission from such obligation, shall operate and maintain in safe, efficient 
and proper condition, all the facilities and instrumentalities used in connec- 
tion with the regulation, measurement and delivery of electric current to 
any consumer up to. and including the point of delivery into the wiring owned 
by the consumer. 

Rule 25. Extensions. 

Each utility shall adopt rules, subject to the approval of the Commission, 
under which it will, upon written request for service by a prospective con- 
sumer or a group of prospective consumers, located in the same neighbor- 
hood, make the extension necessary to give service and furnish service con- 
nection or connections. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 93 

Rule 26. Rate Schedule — Rules and Regulations. 

(a) Copies of all schedules of rates for service, forms of contracts, charges 
for service connections and extensions of circuits, and of all rules and regu- 
lations covering the relations of consumer and utility, shall he filed by each 
utility in the office of the Commission. Copies of such rates, rules and regu- 
lations shall be furnished consumers or prospective consumers upon request. 

(b) Consumers applying for more than one class of service on the same 
premises shall so arrange their wiring that each class of service can be 
metered separately, (unless utility has schedule on file covering service to a 
combination of classes on one meter) and consumers purchasing any partic- 
ular class of service shall confine the use of current supplied thereunder to 
the purposes set forth in the rate schedule for such class. Separate meters will 
be required for each building on the same premises except outhouses and 
for each separate class of service in the same buildiing except when a com- 
mercial lighting consumer occupies the same building in part for residential 
purposes the utility may supply both the commercial and residential lighting 
through one meter at the commercial lighting rate, or on rural lines at the 
rural rate. 

(c) Consumers desiring service in excess of 25 H.P. will be required 
to enter into term contracts with the utility supplying service, for the period 
established in the schedule of rates filed with the Commission. Failure to 
enter into contract for the period specified in the rate schedule will entitle 
the utility to impose a surcharge of five per cent on all bills rendered to such 
consumers. The utility shall not be required to supply service for a period 
of less than one year except under rate schedules designed expressly for short 
term service. In case of initial contracts for service where the investment 
required of the utility is large, the Commission may require contracts of suf- 
ficiently long term to justify the investment, regardless of the provisions of 
the rate schedule filed for such service. 

Rule 27. Statutory Conflicts. 

In any instance in which there may be a conflict between the provisions 
of the Consolidated Statutes of North Carolina and the foregoing rules, the 
provisions of the Consolidated Statutes shall apply. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self. 

This 20th day of October, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7196. 

ORDER ADOPTING UNIFORM CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS, CLAS- 
SIFYING PUBLIC UTILITIES, AND REQUIRING THE FILING OF 
ANNUAL AND OTHER REPORTS. 

Order 

Ordered, That all individuals, copartnerships, corporations or associations, 
their lessees, trustees or receivers, engaged in the businesses enumerated in 
Section 1035 of the Consolidated Statutes, and amendments thereto, shall keep 
their records of accounts in conformity with the Uniform Classification of Ac- 
counts adopted by the National Association of Railroad and Utilities Com- 
missioners and the Interstate Commerce Commission; that all such public 



94 



N, C. Corporation Commission 



utilities shall file with this Commission annual reports on or before the first 
day of April of each year for the preceding year ended December thirty-first; 
that all such public utilities shall file with the Commission special reports 
from time to time, as requested; and that all such reports shall conform to- 
the following classification and forms, which are based upon the Uniform 
System of Accounts but which are modified, in some instances, in details of 
basic accounts; 



Description Classificat 

Utilities operating electric properties 
having annual operating revenues ex- 
ceeding $250,000 A 

Utilities operating electric and gas prop- 
erties having annual operating reve- 
nues exceeding $250,000 A 

Utilities operating electric, gas and street 
railway properties having annual oper- 
ating revenues exceeding $250,000 A 

Utilities operating gas properties having 
annual operating revenues exceeding 
$250,000 A 

Utilities operating telephone properties 

having annual operating revenues ex- A 
ceeding $100,000 

Utilities operating telegraph and cable A 
properties 

Utilities operating v/ater properties A 

Utilities operating railway express com- A 
panies 

Utilities operating sleeping car companies A 

Utilities operating electric railways (ex- A 
cept street railways) 

Utilities operating motor vehicle com- 
mon carrier service, having operating 
revenues exceeding $50,000 A 

Utilities operating electric properties 
having annual operating; revenues of 
$50,000, but not over $250,000 B 

Utilities operating gas properties having 
annual operating revenues exceeding 
$50,000, but not over $250,000 B 

Utilities operating telephone properties 
having annual operating revenues ex- 
ceeding $20,000, but not more than B 
$100,000 

Utilities operating motor vehicle com- 
mon carrier service having operating 
revenue of $50,000, or less -- B 

Utilities operating electric properties 
having annual operating revenues ex- 
ceeding $10,000, but not over $50,000 C 

Utilities operating gas properties having 
annual operating revenues exceeding 
$10,000, but not over $50,000 C 

Utilities operating telephone properties 
having annual operating revenues of 
$20,000, or less C 



Report Form 
ion Prescribed 



N.C.C.C. Form A 



N.C.C.C. Form A 



N.C.C.C. Form A 



N.C.C.C. Form A 



N.C.C.C. 


Form T 


I.C.C. 


Form M 


N.C.C.C. 


Form A2 


I.C.C. 


Form 


N.C.C.C. 


Form A3 


N.C.C.C. 


Form A5 


I.CC. 


Form H 


N.C.C.C. 


Form A6 


I.C.C. 


Form I 


N.C.C.C. 


Form A7 


I.C.C. 


Form G 



N.C.C.C. Form A8 



N.C.C.C. Form A 



N.C.C.C. Form A 



N.C.C.C. Form Tl 
I.C.C. Form N 



N.C.C.C. Form A8 
N.C.C.C. Form B 
N.C.C.C. Form A 
N.C.C.C. Form T2 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 95 

Report Form 
Description Classification Prescribed 

Utilities operating electric properties 
having annual revenues of $10,000, or 
less D N.C.C.C. Form B 

Utilities operating gas properties having 

annual revenues of $10,000, or less D N.C.C.C. Form A 

Utilities operating steam railroads hav- 
ing operating revenues above $1,000,000 I Report Form A Steam 

Utilities operating steam railroads hav- 
ing operating revenues above $100,000 

and not exceeding $1,000,000 II Report Form C Steam 

Utilities operating steam railroads having 

revenues of $100,000, and less Ill Report Form G Steam 

Terminal and switching companies Ill Report Form D Steam 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This November 1, 1931. Clerk, 

Docket No. 7196. 

APPLICATION OF ARTHUR S. IVES AND ROLLAND A. DAVIDSON FOR 
CERTIFICATE OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY FOR THE 
ACQUISITION OP PHYSICAL PROPERTY OP ALMOND LIGHT AND 
POWER COMPANY, ALBEMARLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity 

Upon receipt of application in due form of the above named applicants, 
authority is, hereby, granted to the applicants to acquire all the physical 
property of the Almond Light and Power Company in the vicinity of Albemarle, 
North Carolina, and elsewhere in Stanly County. 

The Commission finds that public convenience and necessity requires the 
granting of this certificate. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 31st day of October, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7155. 

APPLICATION OF SOUTH EAST PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY FOR CER- 
TIFICATE OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY FOR THE 
ACQUISITION OF ELECTRIC PROPERTY OWNED BY ARTHUR S. IVES 
AND ROLLAND A. DAVIDSON, IN STANLY COUNTY, NORTH CARO- 
LINA, NEAR ALBEMARLE. 

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity 

Upon receipt of application in due form of the above named applicant, 
authority is hereby granted to the applicant to acquire the electric property 
owned by Arthur S. Ives and Rolland A. Davidson, in Stanly County, North 
Carolina, near Albemarle. 

The Commission finds that public convenience and necessity requires the 
granting of this certificate. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 31st day of October, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7155. 



96 N. C. CoRPOKATioN Commission 

RE: CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY APPLICATION FOR RESCIS- 
SION OF ORDER WITH RESPECT TO DEPRECIATION RESERVE AI^ 
LOCATED TO STREET RAILWAY DEPARTMENT OF FORMER ASHE- 
VILLE POWER & LIGHT COMPANY. 

Order 

Whereas, this proceeding came on to be heard at the office of this Commis- 
sion in Raleigh, on the 21st day of July, 1932, pursuant to Petition filed the 
16th day of July, 1932, and 

Whereas, it was shown for and on behalf of the Petitioner, Carolina Power 
& Light Company, that the street railway property of the former Asheville 
Power and Light Company (now owned by said Carolina Power & Light 
Company), after payment of operating expenses, has not earned the amount 
of $53,199.93 required by the order of this Commission dated September 25, 
1919, to be set aside and added to the depreciation reserve of the former 
Asheville Power and Light Company; and 

Whereas, conditions affecting the operation of street railway property have 
grown steadily worse since the entering of said order dated September 25, 
1919, so that the requirement of said order with respect to the setting aside 
of a depreciation reserve from the earnings of the street railway property 
of the former Asheville Power and Light Company has, by virtue of circum- 
stances which could not have been foreseen at the time of the entering of 
said order, become unjust and unreasonable: 

Now therefore, it is 

Ordered that so much of said order of this Commission dated September 
25, 1919, as requires Carolina Power & Light Company, as the successor in 
interest of Asheville Power and Light Company, to allocate to the street rail* 
way property formerly owned by Asheville Power and Light Company a pro- 
portion or any proportion of said Carolina Power & Light Company's depre- 
ciation reserve or fund or to set aside any sum or sums, annually or other- 
wise, from the earnings of said street railway property to be added to such 
depreciation reserve or fund, or to credit to such depreciation reserve or fund 
interest from so much thereof as is not expended for replacement of depreciable 
property, be, and the same hereby is rescinded, annulled and cancelled as of 
the date of this order; and 

It is further 

Ordered that Carolina Power & Light Company be, and it hereby is, author- 
ized to add to and commingle with its general depreciation reserve, to be- 
come an integral part of such general depreciation reserve, any and all sums 
or funds set aside pursuant to said order of this Commission dated Septem- 
ber 25, 1919. 

By order of the Commission: W. T. Lee, 

This 21st day of July, 1932. Chairman. 

Attest: 

R. 0. Self, Clerk. 

Docket No. 7313. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 97 

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OP THE CAROLINA MOUNTAIN 
POWER CORPORATION OF THE STATE OF DELAWARE FOR A CER- 
TIFICATE OF CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY, AUTHORIZING ITS 
PURCHASE OF THE PROPERTY OF THE CAROLINA MOUNTAIN 
POWER COMPANY LOCATED AT LAKE LURE IN THE STATE OF 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

Ceetificatei of Convenience and Necessity 

At a meeting of the Corporation Commission of the State of North Caro- 
lina held in its office at Raleigh, N. C, at eleven o'clock, a.m., August 13, 
1931, the above named corporation having duly made application to the Cor- 
poration Commission for a certificate of convenience and necessity to acquire 
the properties of the Carolina Mountain Power Company located at and in 
the vicinity of Lake Lure, North Carolina, and the petitioner having com- 
plied with the rules of this Commission with reference to such application, 
the Commission further finds: 

1. That the Carolina Mountain Power Company has been in the hands 
of receivers under the jurisdiction of the Federal Court of the Western 
District of North Carolina and that the Federal Judge of that district has 
signed an order directing the receivers and referees to execute a deed 

. to the Carolina Mountain Power Corporation upon the payment of the 
purchase price approved. 

2. Tliat the Carolina Mountain Power Company has built a lake and 
from the impounded waters of such lake generates electricity, which 
places it in the public utility class. 

3. That the purchaser is ready to pay the price and take the deed as 
ordered and approved by the Court. 

Now, therefore, this Commission finds that public convenience and neces- 
sity requires the authorization requested as proposed in the application ; 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted, effective immediately. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Dated at Raleigh, N. C. Clerk. 

This 13th day of August, 1931. 

Docket No. 7103. 

IN THE MATTER OF DISCONTINUING THE OPERATION OF STREET 
RAILWAY CARS OVER CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY'S GLEN- 
WOOD AVENUE LINE WITHIN AND OUTSIDE THE LIMITS OF THE 
CITY OF RALEIGH AND SUBSTITUTING THE OPERATION OF MOTOR 
BUSES THEREFOR OVER A PORTION OF SAID LINE. 

Order 

Upon the petition in the above matter, filed with the North Carolina Cor- 
poration Commission by the Carolina Power & Light Company on the eighth 
day of December, 1931, it is hereby 

Ordered, That a hearing be held by the Commission at its office in the City 
of Raleigh, North Carolina, on Thursday, January 7, 1932, at 2:30 o'clock 
p.m., and that notice of said hearing be given to the public by the publication 
7 



98 'N. C. Corporation Commission 

of attached notice in three consecutive issues prior to December 25, 1931, in 
The Raleigh Times and in The News and Observer, newspapers published in 
the City of Raleigh, North Carolina, and that the petitioner be required to 
pay the cost of advertising. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 12th day of December, 1931. Clerh. 

Docket No. 7179. 

NOTICE OF HEARING UPON PETITION FILED BY CAROLINA POWER 
& LIGHT COMPANY WITH THE NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION 
COMMISSION ON DECEMBER 8, 1931. 

To whom it may concern: 

Notice is hereby given that the Carolina Power & Light Company, on the 
eighth day of December, 1931, filed with the North Carolina Corporation Com- 
mission a petition, in which the Carolina Power & Light Company asks that 
the Commission make an order: 

(1) Approving the agreement entered into between the petitioner 
and the City of Raleigh and authorizing the petitioner to discontinue 
the operation of street cars and to substitute motor buses therefor over 
and along the following streets in the City of Raleigh, to-wit: Glenwood 
Avenue, South West Street, Hargett Street, Dawson Street, and that por- 
tion of Martin Street between Dawson Street and Fayetteville Street; 

(2) Authorizing the petitioner to discontinue the operation of street 
railway cars over petitioner's Glenwood Avenue line beyond the City 
limits and to remove its trackage and overhead equipment used exclu- 
sively for the operation of street cars, and to substitute motor bus service 
over and along that portion of its said Glenwood Avenue line between 
the City of Raleigh and the junction point of Glenwood Avenue, Ridge- 
crest Road and Lassiter's Mill Road; 

(3) Granting a Certificate of Convenience and Necessity to petitioner, 
covering the operation of said motor buses. 

And further, notice is hereby given that pursuant to an order made oy the 
Corporation Commission on the twelfth day of December, 1931, the Commis- 
sion will hold a public hearing in its office in the State Departments Building, 
at the corner of Edenton and Salisbury streets in the city of Raleigh, at 
2:30 o'clock p.m., on Thursday, January 7, 1932, at which time the public, 
or any member thereof, will be given an opportunity to be heard in favor of 
or against the granting of said petition. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 12th day of December, 1931 Clerh. 

Docket No. 7179. 

IN THE MATTER OP DISCONTINUING THE OPERATION OP STREET 
RAILWAY CARS OVER CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY'S 
GLENWOOD AVENUE LINE WITHIN AND OUTSIDE THE LIMITS OP 
THE CITY OP RALEIGH, AND SUBSTITUTING THE OPERATION OF 
MOTOR BUSES THEREFOR OVER A PORTION OF SAID LINE. 

Order 
This cause coming on to be heard and being heard before the North Caro- 
lina Corporation Commission at 2:30 o'clock p. m., on January 7, 1932, and it 
appearing to the Commission, and the Commission finding as facts: 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 99 

I. That the Carolina Power & Light Company, a public service corpora- 
tion, dulj^ filed its petition herein with the Commission on the 8th day of 
December, 1931, and that the Commission, on the 12th day of December, 1931, 
made an order providing for a public hearing upon the said petition on the 
7th day of January, 1932, at 2:30 o'clock p.m., and providing that notice of 
said public hearing be published in the Raleigh News and Observe?- and the 
Raleigh Times, two daily newspapers published in the City of Raleigh and 
having a general circulation within the City and surrounding territory, and 
that, pursuant to said order, said notice was duly published. 

II. That no answer to the petition has been filed and no written protest 
has been made against the granting of the order asked for in said petition; 
that a number of citizens appeared at the hearing, including representatives 
of the City of Raleigh and the Chamber of Commerce of the City of Raleigh; 
one citizen living beyond the limits of the City of Raleigh and in the vicinity 
of the Carolina Country Club appeared at the hearing to request that the 
buses to be substituted for street cars be operated beyond the city limits into 
the vicinity of the Carolina Country Club. 

III. TTiat Carolina Power & Light Company owns an electric street rail- 
way system, which it operates wholly within the City of Raleigh, except a 
portion of one line thereof which runs over and along Glenwood Avenue be- 
yond the City limits to the vicinity of the Carolina Country Club. 

IV. That the North Carolina Highway Commission contemplates the con- 
struction of a new hard surfaced highway between the City of Raleigh and 
the City of Durham in order to relieve the congestion of traffic and provide 
greater safety to the public; that the proposed new State Highway, when 
constructed, will be routed into the City of Raleigh over and along Glenwood 
Avenue, provided the operation of electric street railway cars over and along 
Glenwood Avenue is discontinued; that said Avenue is the only accessible 
route into the City of Raleigh for said proposed highway, for the reason 
that other avenues of approach are too restricted in width and constitute a 
hazard to the traveling public. 

V. That the City of Raleigh and the Carolina Power & Light Company, at 
the request of a special committee of the Chamber of Commerce of the City, 
and in order to improve traffic conditions and provide for the greater safety 
and convenience of the public, have entered into an agreement, a copy of 
which has been filed with the Commission, providing, at the expense of Caro- 
lina Power & Light Company, (1) for the discontinuance of the operation of 
street railway cars over and along Glenwood Avenue, South West Street, 
Hargett Street, Dawson Street, and that portion of Martin Street between 
Dawson Street and Fayetteville Street; (2) for the substitution of motor 
buses over and along the route within the City now traversed by the said 
Glenwood Avenue street cars; (3) for the removal of certain trackage and 
overhead equipment used exclusively for the operation of street cars; and 
(4) for certain construction work, including street paving and street sur- 
facing, along the above named streets. 

VI. That in the operation of that portion of said Glenwood Avenue line 
from the Lassiter Mill Road crossing to the end of the line, the Carolina 
Power & Light Company is carrying an average of less than one (1) passen- 



100 ]>r. C. Corporation Commission 

ger per street car trip and is annually sustaining, in the operation of said 
portion of said line, an out-of-pocket loss of One Thousand Six Hundred and 
Thirty-five ($1,635.00) Dollars, exclusive of general office expenses, taxes, 
depreciation, and interest on investment. 

VII. That the number of passengers carried over the Raleigh street rail- 
way system as a whole has continuously decreased since 1925 and likewise 
the gross operating revenues from the operation of the street railway system 
have decreased to the extent that during the twelve months ending July 31, 
1931, the gross revenues were Seventy-one Thousand Two Hundred Pour and 
50/100 ($71,204.50) Dollars less than the gross revenues of 1925. 

VIII. That the Raleigh street railway properties of the Carolina Power 
& Light Company were valued by J. G. White Company as of September 1, 
1920, based on the previous ten years averge prices, at the sum of Six Hun- 
dred Fifty-four Thousand One Hundred and Thirty-two ($654,132.00) Dollars; 
that the total operating revenues from the system for the twelve months end- 
ing July 31, 1931, were One Hundred Forty-one Thousand Four Hundred 
Eighty-six and 50/100 ($141,486.50) Dollars, and the total operating expenses 
for the same period were One Hundred Twenty-two Thousand Nine Hundred 
Eighty and 71/100 ($122,980.71) Dollars, leaving the sum of Eighteen Thou- 
sand Five Hundred Five and 79/100 ($18,505.79) Dollars as net from opera- 
tions, before depreciation, during said twelve months' period, which said sum 
does not constitute a fair and reasonable return upon the present fair value 
of the street railway properties. 

IX. That in addition to substituting motor buses for the electric street 
railway cars within the City of Raleigh over and along the route now traversed 
within the City by the Glenwood Avenue street railway cars, as provided 
for in the contract entered into between Carolina Power & Light Company and 
the City of Raleigh, the Carolina Power & Light Company now proposes to 
extend the operation of said motor buses beyond the city limits of Raleigh 
along said Glenwood Avenue to the junction point of said Avenue with Ridge- 
crest Road and Lassiter's Mill Road. 

X. That the operation of buses instead of street cars over and along the 
several streets now traversed by the Glenwood Avenue street railway cars 
will reduce the congestion in traffic over and along said streets and will 
afford greater safety and protection to the public against injuries to persons 
and property; that the operation of said buses is a public necessity and will 
greatly promote public convenience. 

It is therefore. 

Ordered, Adjudged and Decreed: 

1. That all those portions of the contract dated November 28, 1931, en- 
tered into between the City of Raleigh and Carolina Power & Light Company 
which require approval by the North Carolina Corporation Commission be 
and the same are in all respects hereby approved, and the Carolina Power & 
Light Company is hereby authorized and empowered to permanently discon- 
tinue the operation of street cars over and along Glenwood Avenue, South 
West Street, Hargett Street, Dawson Street, and that portion of Martin Street 
between Dawson Street and Fayetteville Street, and to remove such of the 
trackage and overhead equipment used exclusively in the operation of said 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 101 

street railway cars, as provided for in the aforesaid contract between Caro- 
lina Power & Light Company and the City of Raleigh, and is further author- 
ized and empowered to permanently discontinue the operation of electric 
street railway cars over and along that portion of the Glenwood Avenue line 
which extends from the limits of the City of Raleigh to the vicinity of the 
Carolina Country Club, and to remove its trackage and overhead equipment 
used exclusively in the operation of said electric street railway cars, provided 
Carolina Power & Light Company shall substitute motor buses for the electric 
street railway cars which are to be discontinued over and along Glenwood 
Avenue within the City of Raleigh, South West Street, Hargett Street, Daw- 
son Street and that portion of Martin Street between Dawson Street and Fay- 
etteville Street and over and along the remainder of the route traversed by 
the Glenwood Avenue electric railway cars, and provided it shall substitute 
motor buses over and along Glenwood Avenue between the limits of the City 
of Raleigh and the point of intersection of Glenwood Avenue, Ridgecrest Road 
and Lassiter's Mill Road. In the interest of the convenience of the public, 
the routing of said buses may be changed from time to time, with the con- 
sent and approval of the Commissioners of the City of Raleigh, to other por- 
tions of the above named streets or to other streets within the City. Subject 
to the right of the North Carolina Corporation Commission to fix the fares 
and tolls charged passengers upon said buses, the fares and tolls now charged 
passengers on street cars within the City of Raleigh shall be applicable to 
said motor buses and that, for a continuous trip, transfer tickets shall on 
demand be issued to passengers on said motor buses, which transfer tickets 
shall be good upon street cars and, in like manner, transfer tickets issued to 
passengers on street cars shall be good upon said motor buses. 

2. That the operation of buses by the Carolina Power & Light Company 
as provided for in the contract dated November 28, 1931, entered into by and 
between said Company and the City of Raleigh, is a public necessity and will 
promote the convenience of the public, and a Certificate of Convenience and 
Necessity authorizing the operation of said buses is hereby ordered issued 
under Chapter 455 of the Public Laws of 1931. 

3. That the costs of publishing the notices of this hearing be paid by the 
petitioner, Carolina Power & Light Company, 

By order of the Commission: W. T. Lee, 

Chairman. 
Attest: 

R. 0. Self, Clerk. 
This January 11, 1932. 
Docket No. 7179. 



102 N. C. Corporation Commission 

IN THE MATTER OF DISCONTINUING THE OPERATION OF STREET 
RAILWAY CARS OVER CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY'S 
GLENWOOD AVENUE LINE WITHIN AND OUTSIDE THE LIMITS OF 
THE CITY OF RALEIGH AND SUBSTITUTING THE OPERATION OF 
MOTOR BUSES THEREFOR OVER A PORTION OF SAID LINE. 

Order Ove21ruling E'xceptions 

This cause came on to be heard before the North Carolina Corporation 
Commission at 2:30 o'clock p.m., on January 7, 1932, and thereafter an 
order was made by the Commission, granting the relief prayed for in the 
petition. Thereafter, on January 15, 1932, M. A, Rushton, a citizen living 
outside of the limits of the City of Raleigh and in the vicinity of the 
Carolina Country Club, filed an exception to the order of the Commission 
on the ground that the Commission had no power or authority to make said 
order. The Commission conducted an open hearing on March 25, 1932, at 
2:30 o'clock p.m., upon the exception filed by the said M. A. Rushton, at 
which time counsel for the said M. A. Rushton filed a further exception to 
the order of the Commission upon the ground that said order was discrimina- 
tory. Although the last exception was not filed in apt time, the Commission 
gave consideration to both of the exceptions, and is of the opinion that 
the Commission had the power and authority to make the said order and 
that said order is not discriminatory, and 

It is, now, 

Ordered, Adjudged and Decreed, That the exceptions filed by the said 
M. A. Rushton be, and they are hereby, overruled and dismissed. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This May 4, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7179. 

APPLICATION OF SOUTHERN PUBLIC UTILITIES COMPANY FOR 
CERTIFICATE OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY FOR THE 
ACQUISITION OF THE ELECTRIC GENERATING AND DISTRIBUTING 
SYSTEMS OF THE NATIONAL UTILITIES COMPANY OF NORTH 
CAROLINA AT MARION, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity 

Upon receipt of application in due form of the above-named applicant to 
acquire the physical property of the electric generating and distributing 
systems of the National Utilities Company of North Carolina at Marion, 
North Carolina, the Commission, after due consideration thereof, finds that 
public convenience and necessity require the granting of the certificate; 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the certificate be, and it is hereby, granted. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 20th day of February, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7231. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 103 

IN RE: COMPLAINT OF NORTHWEST CAROLINA UTILITIES, INCOR- 
PORATED, G. T. ROBBINS, MANAGER, BLOWING ROCK, NORTH 
CAROLINA V. C. E. HAMBY, WARRENSVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

This complaint having been made by the above-named company against 
its competitor, Mr. C. E. Hamby, of Warrensville, North Carolina, alleging 
that Mr. Hamby is operating a small power plant there; that he has, during 
the past year or more, taken practically all the customers away from the 
Northwest Carolina Utilities, Incorporated, in that community by the applica- 
tion of unauthorized electric light and power rates; and, that he has not 
secured from the North Carolina Corporation Commission certificate of 
public convenience and necessity for the construction of transmission lines, 
required under Sec. 1037 (e), Chapter 21, Article 3, Vol. I, Consolidated 
Statutes, it is 

Ordered, That the said C. E. Hamby appear before this Commission on 
January 26, 1932, and show cause why he has failed to comply with the 
statutes with reference to obtaining approval of his tariffs and securing 
certificate of public convenience and necessity covering the construction of 
transmission lines. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 12th day of January, 1932. Cleric. 

Docket No. 7030. 

IN RE: COMPLAINT OF THE NORTHWEST CAROLINA UTILITIES, IN- 
CORPORATED, G. T. ROBBINS, MANAGER. BLOWING ROCK, N. C. v. 
C. E. HAMBY, WARRENSVILLE, N. C. 

Order Amending Order of January 12, 1932 

Whereas, the Commission made an order on January 12, 1932, with refer- 
ence to the above subject, citing the said Respondent to appear at the of- 
fice of the Commission and show certain things named in said order, and 
whereas it appears that the date named therein may greatly inconvenience the 
respondent and his attorney, it is 

Ordered, That the said order of January 12, 1932, be, and the same is 
hereby, cancelled pending conference between the respondent, or his attorney, 
and the Commission. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 13th day of January, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7030. 

PIEDMONT UTILITIES COMPANY 

METERED SERVICE, RESIDENCE, COMMERCIAL, AND CHURCH 
LIGHTING AND FUEL 
Character of Service: 

Continuous service twenty-four hours per day in Hickory, West Hickory, 
Highland, Longview, Newton, Conover, Lenoir, Granite Falls, and Hud- 
son, N. C. 



104 JS". C. Corporation Commission 

Schedule A 

Rates: (Block based on quantity of gas consumed per month). 

First one thousand cubic feet of gas consumed per meter per month $2.20 

Next two thousand cubic feet of gas consumed 1.90 

Next two thousand cubic feet of gas consumed 1.80 

Next five thousand cubic feet of gas consumed 1.70 

Next ten thousand cubic feet of gas consumed 1.65 

Next ten thousand cubic feet of gas consumed 1.55 

All over thirty thousand cubic feet of gas consumed 1.45 

Schedule B 

Minimum Monthly Bill 

Optional water heating rate and refrigerating rate to apply to gas con- 
sumed through one meter per month. 

First fifteen hundred cubic feet of gas consumed to be paid for at the 
regular rate; all over fifteen hundred cubic feet consumed $1.20. Providing 
same is on a yearly contract basis for the first fifteen hundred cubic feet 
consumed. 

Schedule C 

Optional industrial block rate. 

First three thousand cubic feet of gas consumed by one meter per 
month, to be paid for at the regular rate. 

Next twenty-two thousand cubid feet consumed $1.20 

Next twenty-five thousand cubic feet consumed 1.10 

Over fifty thousand cubic feet consumed 1.00 

Provided same is on a yearly contract basis for the first three thousand 
cubic feet consumed. 

Discount: 

When bills are paid on or before the tenth of the month following that 
in which the gas was consumed, then the rates as given shall be decreased 
10 cents for each thousand cubic feet of gas consumed or fraction thereof. 
When the tenth of the month falls upon Sunday or a holiday, the following 
day shall be considered the last day for the payment of the bill without 
loss of discount. 

Remittance in payment of bills sent by mail on or previous to the last 
day for payment of bills net, as evidenced by the U. S. Postoffice date stamp 
prior to the hour of closing Company's office will be accepted as a tender 
of payment within the period when bills can be paid without loss of 
discount. 

Meter Reset Charge: 

In case a meter is removed for non-payment of bill or upon request 
of consumer, a payment of $1.50 in advance shall be made for reinstallation 
of meter. 

Terms of Contract: 

Contract will be made for thirty days and will continue thereafter until 
terminated by notice, except in the case of yearly contracts. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 105 



Schedule D 



Special contracts will be made with large or small consumers for heat, 
light and power, where said contracts are in behalf of, and for the benefit 
of both consumer and company commensurate with the service rendered 
by consumer and company with a time limit of the contract and the cost 
of supplying such service. 

Special House Heating Rate: 
October 1 to April 30, inclusive. 

$2.00 per thousand cubic feet of hourly demand. 

Next 10,000 cubic feet of gas consumed $ .85 per thousand 

Next 20,000 cubic feet of gas consumed 75 per thousand 

All over and above stated amount 70 per thousand 

Special Rate to Employees: 

The Piedmont Utilities Company will sell gas to their employees for 
cooking, water heating and refrigeration at the rate of $1.10 per thousand 
feet of gas consumed with a minimum bill of $1.50 per month. 

Efeective May 1, 1931. R. O. Set.f, 

Order April 2, 1931. Clerh. 

Docket No. 7046. 

IN RE: PETITION OF SOUTHERN PUBLIC UTILITIES COMPANY TO 
CONSOLIDATE WITH ITS PROPERTY THAT OF THE NORTH CARO- 
LINA PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY, CALDWELL POWER COMPANY, 
BRADLEY ELECTRIC COMPANY, COUNTY SERVICE COMPANY, AND 
SURRY POWER COMPANY. 

Order 
The above petition having been filed with the Commisison fo rthe South- 
ern Public Utilities Company to consolidate with it the property of the 
companies above-named, said consolidation to be effective as of July 1, 1932, 
and the Commission having heard this matter on July 27, in its office in 
Raleigh, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted and that the Southern Public Utilities 
Company be, and it is hereby, authorized to acquire the properties of the 
companies named in its application. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 3d day of August, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7324. 

APPLICATION OF TIDE WATER POWER COMPANY FOR CERTIFICATE 
OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION 
OF THE ELECTRIC DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AND WATER PLANT 
AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM IN THE TOWN OF BEAUFORT, 
CARTERET COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity 
Upon receipt of application in due form of the above-named applicant 
to acquire the physical property of the electric distribution system and 



106 N. G. CoKPORATioN Commission 

the water plant and distribution system in the Town of Beaufort, Carteret 
County, North Carolina, the Commission, after due consideration thereof, 
finds that public convenience and necessity require the granting of the 
certificate; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the certificate be, and it is hereby, granted. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 9th day of No\?ember, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7160. 

CITY OP WILMINGTON, Petitioner v. TIDE WATER POWER 
COMPANY, Respondent 

Order 

This petition was filed September 6, 1929, and was set for hearing at 11 
o'clock a.m., Tuesday, November 19, 1929. 

The Petitioner stated that it desired the Commission to appoint engineers 
to make an appraisal of the property. The Respondent stated that it had 
an appraisal of its properties, as of January 1, 1929, made by Loeb and Shaw 
of New York City, and that it had been brought up to October, 1929. 

The Commission then made an order that the appraisal of the properties 
of the Tide Water Power Company made by Loeb and Shaw, engineers, 
dated January 1, 1929, with amendments thereto bringing said appraisal 
up to October 31, 1929, be submitted to the counsel for the City of Wilming- 
ton for study, together with a detailed statement of the receipts and dis- 
bursements of the company from March 1, 1929, to October 31, 1929; and, 
said cause was continued for hearing at a date to be fixed after the City 
of Wilmington had notified this Commission of its readiness for hearing. 

In due course, the Commission was advised by the City of Wilmington 
of its readiness and hearing was set for May 19, 1930. The matter was 
heard on that date and continued for four days. 

The Tide Water Power Company has general offices in the City of Wil- 
mington and supplies Wilmington and more than forty small towns in New 
Hanover and adjoining counties with electricity. Its gas properties, upon 
request of the complainant, were eliminated from this case. It also has 
properties in the vicinity of Kinston, known as the Carolina Gas and 
Electric Company, which has no physical connection with the other electric 
properties mentioned above. It is a North Carolina corporation, as evidenced 
by Chapter 1S3, Private Laws of 1907. 

The Respondent's appraisal, as made, was delivered to Petitioner's at- 
torneys, who, with its engineers and accountants, made an exhaustive review 
and presented it with evidence accompanied by brief in detail. Since the 
appraisal was made for financing purposes, at a time when such properties 
were looked upon with great favor for speculation, its value is in excess of 
that which this Commission would recognize for rate-making purposes; 
and, on the other hand, the Petitioner would include values, depreciations 
and deductions, which, when taken as a whole, would reduce the value 
below a reasonable base for rate-making. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 107 

To illustrate the wide difference in opinions of the contestants in this 
case, reference is made to the second paragraph of Section 9 of Petitioner's 
brief: 

We respectfully call to the Commission's attention our Exhibit No. 
8, in Exhibit No. 1, Report 402, of Mees and Mees, Inc., in which it 
is shown that Loeb and Shaw's valuation of the Electric Department, 
with which we are only dealing and not considering the Gas and 
Railway Department, and that on said Exhibit it will be noted that 
Loeb and Shaw estimate the value of the Electric Department property 
at $3,898,685, which is shown as "Reproduction Cost — New," and after 
taking off depreciation they show the net value of the Electric De- 
partment at $3,666,834.00, whereas Mees and Mees estimate the "Re- 
production Cost— New" of the Electric Department, at $2,536,000.00, and 
after allowing what the complainant respectfully submits is the proper 
depreciation, we arrive at the net value of the Electric Department 
property at $1,975,000.00. 

The following is taken from Page 40, Respondent's brief: 

It will be seen from the figures on this page that the reproduction 
value, less depreciation, of the company's electrical property is $5,000,- 
000.00. The gross revenue year ending March 31, 1930, is $956,773.83, 
less operation expenses of $520,990.95, leaves net operating earnings 
available for depreciation and fair return of $435,782.88. From this 
should be deducted depreciation of 4 per cent on depreciable property, 
amounting to $150,202.64, which leaves a balance available for fair 
return on a rate base of $285,580.24. A fair return of 8 per cent, as 
we contend we are entitled to receive on $5,000,000.00, would be $400,- 
000.00, and the difference between the actual return the defendant is 
now receiving of $285,580.24 and the amount which we are entitled to 
receive of $400,000.00, leaves a deficiency in the fair return to the 
company of $114,414.76, or 2.29 per cent deficiency of fair return. 

The foregoing quotations are mentioned largely for the purpose of show- 
ing the debatable difference. Arbitrary cost allocations play so large a part 
in such studies and qualified experts differ so strongly on the proper alloca- 
tions of large items of cost that the most elaborate appraisals, fortified 
by charts and tables, setting forth periods of experience and averages from 
the best general practices of such utilities, are in the end largely reduced 
to matters of opinion. 

A study of these appraisals, made by two reputable engineering firms, 
leads one to conclude that there is no definitely fixed basis for determining 
the fair value of property used in public service, although the courts have 
set up certain elements of value which must be considered and included 
in any basis which may be established. 

In considering the values involved in this case, the Commission has had 
the benefit of the result of a general study of a large number of power plants 
scattered over the United States, reduced to a unit basis for purposes of 
comparison, and in addition thereto makes reference to an article published 
in "The Annalist" April 18, 1930, by W. M. Carpenter, giving a summary 
of a nine year study of values. These documents are not used as evidence 
of the value of Respondent's property in this proceeding, but they assist 
in reconciling the wide variation of contentions of the parties as to the value 
of the property in question. 



108 N. C. CoKPORATioN Commission 

Early regulation was handicapped by lack of suitable standards by which 
to determine reasonable rates. This standard was supplied by the United 
States Supreme Court in the famous case, Smythe v. Ames, in 1898. For 
many years, little difRoulty was found with the standards as laid down by 
the court, and commissions proceeded to establish a general cost system of 
rate making with the general idea that reasonable rates are to be measured 
by the cost of service, including in cost the return required upon capital 
investment. Wherever they found the amount of capital investment un- 
certain, they made an appraisal of the property to supply a reasonable 
substitute figure. This development of policy promised to be effective; and, 
except for high prices during the war, would probably have become generally 
established and accepted as a part of the law of the land. The war with 
its upheaval of price levels and construction costs, caused the utilities to 
demand a "fair value" of the properties upon reproduction cost, to take 
into account the new level of prices rather than the actual cost as had been 
generally adopted. The court, this time, declared that the "fair value" must 
be established as of the time when the rates were under consideration and 
must, threfore, make allowance for the shift in the price level and the 
reproduction cost. Sound reasoning dictates that the consistent application 
of the Supreme Court rule with reference to the rate base can not be deemed 
unfair; and, in obedience to this mandate, the reproduction value, less de- 
preciation, of the electric properties involved is hereby fixed at $3,106,683.00. 

The Commission finds that some of the present rates are excessive and 
not only out of proportion when compared to a fair return upon the present 
fair value, but are too high to easily permit the increased use of electricity 
to keep abreast the normal development of a modern community. It is 
thought that rates should be so set up that a slight increase in con- 
sumption will not be reflected in the highest bracket of the rate; to do so 
is not good merchandising. In the opinion of the Commission, the best rates 
are set up with a definite minimum, easily arrived at, for which a minimum 
consumption is permitted, and the revenue obtained from the sale of the 
actual commodity at so low a cost that its use may be increased. 

The reductions which this order contemplates, when applied to the 
revenue of the company for the twelve months' period ending March 31, 
1930, have the effect of reducing the annual revenue approximately $63,900.00. 
For the same period, this will leave for fair return $248,534.64 (or 8%); 
and $123,348.24, or slightly less than 4 per cent for depreciation. The de- 
preciation deficiency below 4 per cent may be made up in a closer calculation 
of the application of the proposed schedules, and the item when considered 
in money value is no doubt sufficient for the reason that the valuation is 
liberal; therefore, the Tide Water Power Company is hereby 

Ordeeed to file with this Commission as early as practicable, effective on 
meter readings on and after March 1, 1931, the following: 

1. Revised schedule for metered Residential Lighting Service to con- 
sumers in New Hanover County and Rocky Point, said schedule to com- 
prise a total and, as nearly as practicable, a uniform reduction of 10 per 
cent under the schedule now being charged for this class of service. 

2. Revised schedule for metered Residential Lighting Service to con- 
sumers on Transmission Line, said schedule to comprise a total and, 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 109 

and, as nearly as practicable, a uniform reduction of 10 per cent under the 
schedule now being charged for this class of service. 

3. Revised schedule for metered Residential Combination Lighting and 
Heating Service, said schedule for uses in excess of 75 K.W.H. per month 
to comprise an average and, as nearly as practicable, a uniform reduction 
of 10 per cent under the schedule now being charged for this class of 
service. 

4. Revised schedule for metered Commercial Lighting Service to con- 
sumers in New Hanover County and Rocky Point, said schedule to comprise 
a total and, as nearly as practicable, a uniform reduction of 10 per cent 
under the schedule now being charged for this class of service. 

5. Revised schedule for metered Commercial Lighting Service to con- 
sumers on Transmission Line, said schedule to comprise a total and, as 
nearly as practicable, a uniform reduction of 10 per cent under the schedule 
now being charged for this class of service. 

6. Revised schedule for Small Power Service to consumers in New 
Hanover County, said schedule, for connected loads of 10 h.p. and above 
and for use in excess of the present minimum charge, to comprise an 
average and, as nearly as practicable, a uniform reduction of 10 per cent 
under the schedule now being charged for this class of service. 

7. Revised schedule for Small Power Service to consumers on Trans- 
mission Line, said schedule, for connected loads of 10 h.p. and above and 
for use in excess of the present minimum charge, to comprise an average 
and, as nearly as practicable, a uniform reduction of 10 per cent under the 
schedule now being charged for this class of service. 

8. Revised schedule for Medium Power Service to consumers in New Han- 
over County, said schedule for connected loads of 25 h.p. and above and for use 
in excess of the present minimum charge, to comprise an average and, as 
nearly as practicable, a uniform reduction of 10 per cent under the schedule 
now being charged for this class of service. 

9. Revised schedule for Medium Power Service to consumers on Trans- 
mission Line, said schedule for connected loads of 25 h.p. and above and 
for use in excess of the present minimum charge, to comprise an average 
and, as nearly as practicable, a uniform reduction of 10 per cent under the 
schedule now being charged for this class of service. 

10. Revised schedule for Large Power Service to consumers in New 
Hanover County, said schedule for connected loads of 100 h.p. and above and 
for use in excess of the present minimum charge, to comprise an average 
and, as nearly as practicable, a uniform reduction of 8 per cent under the 
schedule now being charged for this class of service. 

11. Revised schedule for Large Power Service to consumers on Trans- 
mission Line, said schedule for connected loads of 100 h.p. and above and 
for use in excess of the present minimum charge to comprise an average 
and, as nearly as practicable, a uniform reduction of 8 per cent under the 
schedule now being charged for this class of service. 

12. Revised schedule for Large Cotton Mill Power, comprising, for use 
in excess of the present minimum charge, an average and, as nearly as prac- 
ticable, a uniform reduction of 10 per cent under the schedule now being 
charged for this class of service. 

13. Revised schedule applicable to City Water Works, comprising, for use 
in excess of the present minimum charge, an average and, as nearly as 
practicable, a uniform reduction of 10 per cent under the schedule now being 
charged for this class of service. 

It is Further Ordered, That, within a reasonable time after the ex- 
piration of six months after March 1, 1931, the said Tide Water Power 
Company file for each of the above revised schedules, properly verified, 
rate curves, or other comparative data, showing in suitable form the revenue 



110 JSr. C. Corporation Commission 

which would have been received during this period if the revised schedules 
had not been effective and the revenue actually received during the same 
period under the revised schedules, and the difference, or loss in revenue, 
occasioned by the application of the revised schedules to the consumption 
for this period. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 19th day of February, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6805. 

CITY OF WILMINGTON v. TIDE WATER POWER COMPANY 
Amendment to Order of February 19, 1931 

In an order which the Commission issued on February 19, 1931, with 
reference to the valuation of the electric properties of the Tide Water 
Power Company and the establishment of rates thereunder, the question 
has been raised as to whether or not the valuation found included properties 
formerly known as Carolina Gas and Electric Company, in the vicinity of 
Kinston; and, while the order referred to above did not specifically exempt 
this property, the order did state there was no physical connection between 
this property in the vicinity of Kinston and the properties composing the 
Wilmington district. The Commission is informed that physical connection 
of these properties has been made recently, since the filing of the petition 
in this case; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the valuation of the electric properties of the Tide Water 
Power Company found by the Commission in its Order of February 19, 1931, 
referred to above, does not include the valuation of the properties nor does 
it affect the rates of what is known as the Carolina Gas and Electric Company 
properties. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 3d day of March, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6805. 

IN RE: HART COTTON MILLS AND FOUNTAIN COTTON MILLS v. 
VIRGINIA ELECTRIC AND POWER COMPANY 

Order 

Now comes the Virginia Electric and Power Company and moves to be 
allowed further time to answer complaints filed with the Commission by 
the Hart Cotton Mills and the Fountain Cotton Mills. Respondent in this 
case asks for approximately thirty days from January 23, 1931; but, inas- 
much as the Commission had already given one thirty-day extension, it is 
now of the opinion that an additional ten days will probably be sufficient; 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the Virginia Electric and Power Company be, and is hereby, 
granted an extension of time for filing answers in the above complaints until 
and including February 2, 1931. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 21st day of January, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket Nos. 6985 and 6986. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 111 

HART COTTON MILLS, INCORPORATED v. VIRGINIA ELECTRIC AND 

POWER COMPANY 

Order Dismissing Cause 

This cause coming on for consideration upon motion filed this day by 
attorneys for petitioner, and it appearing to the Commission that all matters 
in controversy between the parties have been fully settled and determined; 
it is, now, therefore, 

Ordered, That this proceeding be, and it is hereby, dismissed. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 20th day of May, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6985. 

FOUNTAIN COTTON MILLS, INCORPORATED v. VIRGINIA ELECTRIC 
AND POWER COMPANY 

Order Dismissing Cause 

This cause coming on for consideration upon motion filed this day by 
attorneys for petitioner, and it appearing to the Commission that all matters 
in controversy between the parties have been fully settled and determined; 
it is, now, therefore, 

Ordered, That this proceeding be, and it is hereby, dismissed. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 20th day of May, 1932. Cleric. 

Docket No. 6986. 



IN RE: PETITION OF JAMES BARBER ESTATE TO ABANDON CERTAIN 
WATER UTILITY PROPERTIES IN THE VICINITY OF LAKEVIEW, 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

This petition was filed by the James Barber Estate. Mr. Barber, a non- 
resident of this State, had purchased property at Lakeview, N. C, from the 
Lakeview Improvement Company and in this property was a deep well, which 
the former Improvement Company had located for the purpose of pumping 
water for the residences, which had been built on lots sold by the Improve- 
ment Company. After Mr. Barber's death the representatives of his estate 
in New Jersey were required under the law of that State to close out the 
administration thereof, which necessitated disposing of this property. The 
estate's representative at Pinehurst gave the subscribers to this water service 
due notice dated June 16, 1930, that they would stop pumping water on 
September 15, 1930. Protests were filed with the Commission and the 
Commission held a hearing on the matter Friday, November 7, 1930, at 
11:00 a.m. 

A few days after the hearing Mr. J. E. Hewston, representative of the 
estate in this State, died suddenly; therefore, the delay in issuing the 
order. 



112 N. C. Corporation Commission 

It developed at the hearing that the Barber Estate had made several 
propositions to the users of water to take over the pumping and supply 
themselves, which appeared not to have been satisfactory, but under the 
circumstances it appears that the Commission could not afford to require 
this estate to continue the operation of this property when it is evident 
that the few users with very little cost can make arrangements to supply 
themselves; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 11th day of June 1931. Cleric. 

Docket No. G940. 



Appalachian State Teachers College to the Commission. Schedule of 
lighting rates filed and approved. No. 7332. 

Asheville Gas Company to the Commission. Rates for general gas service 
for Asheville filed and approved. No. 7106. 

Auto Electric Service Company v. Asheville Gas Company. Complaint of 
service. Dismissed. No, 6943. 

Best's Service Station v. Bath Electric Company. Complaint as to electric 
rates. Dismissed. No. 7327. 

Clemson Theatre v. Brevard Light and Power Company. Complaint of 
service. Adjusted. No. 6916. 

Dr. J. M. Lilly v. Carolina Gas and Electric Company. Complaint of gas 
rates. Adjusted. No. 7016. 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Following rates 
filed and approved: 

Schedule P-63. Seasonal Oil Mill Service. 

Schedule P-67. Ice Plant Seasonal Service. 

Schedule P-65 Large Miscellaneous Intermittent Power Service. 

Schedule P-50. Large Paper and Pulp Mills. 

No. 6920. 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Rate Schedule P-68. 
Cotton Ginnery Season Service, filed and approved. No. 6923. 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Standard Extension 
Plan R-3 and Rural Village Service Plan R-4, filed and approved. No. 6935. 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Rate Schedule P-70, 
Superseding Schedule P-67, filed and approved. No. 6978. 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Supplemental Ex- 
tension Plan R-3-A, filed and approved. No. 6994. 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Rate schedule P-73, 
Ice Plant Seasonal Service, filed and approved. No. 7093. 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Rate Schedule P-74, 
Power Service for Large Gravel Pits and Stone Quarry Plants, filed and 
approved. No. 7100. 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Rate Schedules 
C-2, S. L. and W. S. L., for Flat Rate Advertising Light, filed and approved. 
No. 7152. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 113 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Rate Schedule P-75, 
for Large Intermittent, Seasonal or Temporary, Miscellaneous Power Service, 
filed and approved. No. 7170. 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Rates for municipal 
street lighting filed and approved. No. 7306. 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Rates for combina- 
tion residential cooking, water heating and lighting filed and approved. 
No. 7309. 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Schedules W. L. 5 
and W. L. 6, white way lighting, pedestal type system; also Schedules W. L. 
39 and W. L. 40, white way lighting, bracket type system, filed and approved. 
No. 7318. 

Town of Cary v. Carolina Power & Light Company. Request for service 
man at Cary. Adjusted. No. 6917. 

Dr. J. R. Speight v. Carolina Power & Light Company. Application for 
rural electric service. Dismissed. No. 6927. 

C. G. Hacker v. Carolina Power & Light Company. Complaint as to 
service. Adjusted. No. 6945. 

Aiken's Pharmacy v. Carolina Power & Light Company. Complaint as to 
rates. Dismissed. No. 6998. 

A. P. Finch v. Carolina Power & Light Company. Complaint of charges 
for service. Adjusted. No. 7012. 

C. E. Lundy v. Carolina Power & Light Company. Complaint of excessive 
rates. Adjusted. No. 7087. 

E. U. Breece v. Carolina Power & Light Company. Complaint of service. 
Dismissed. No. 7172. 

H. E. Mann v. Carolina Power & Light Company. Complaint as to charges 
and meter service. Adjusted. No. 7197. 

George M. Umstead v. Carolina Power & Light Company. Complaint of 
charges for electrical power. Adjusted. No. 7202. 

Z. L. Keever v. Carolina Power & Light Company. Complaint of elec- 
tric service. Dismissed. No. 7245, 

B. P. Andrews v. Carolina Power & Light Company. Complaint of dis- 
crimination in rates. Dismissed. No. 7250. 

Liberty Merchants Association v. Carolina Power & Light Company. Ap- 
plication for reduction in power and light rates. Withdrawn. No. 7278. 

Cold Water Light and Power Company to the Commission. Schedule of 
rates for power filed and approved. No. 7235, 

Concord and Kannapolis Gas Company to the Commission. Gas building 
heating rate for Concord and Kannapolis filed and approved. No. 7107. 

Duke Power Company to the Commission. Supplement No. 1 to Schedule 
of Rates, effective November 1, 1931, together with contracts affected by 
issuance of Supplement, filed and approved. No. 7140. 

Durham Gas Company to the Commission. Rates for general gas service 
for Durham filed and approved. No. 7108. 

Wade H. Bostick v. Durham Gas Company. Complaint as to rates. Ad- 
justed. No. 7319. 

Durham Public Service Company to the Commission. Rate Schedule 
K. Primary Power Service, filed and approved. No. 7119. 
8 



114 ]^; C. COBPORATION COMMISSION 

Durham Public Service Company to the Commission. Rate Schedule 
P-A (Large Power and Lighting Service) and Rate Schedule P (Large Power 
Service) filed and approved. No. 7221. 

Citizens of Sherron Acres v. Durham Public Service Company. Complaint 
of electric light rates. Adjusted. No. 7237. 

W. G. White v. East Tennessee Light and Power Company. Complaint 
of rates. Dismissed. No. 7015. 

Elizabeth and Suburban Gas Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to charge $1.00, under Rule No. 52, for disconnection and 
reconnecting at new location. Approved. No. 7094. 

Gastonia and Suburban Gas Company to the Commission. Gas rate for 
building heating in Gastonia filed and approved. No. 7109. 

Frank D. Stasinos v. Henderson and Oxford Gas Company. Complaint 
as to the quality of gas. Adjusted. No. 7017. 

International Public Utilities to the Commission. Application to con- 
struct a power line from Morehead City to Atlantic and furnish power to 
consumers in town of Atlantic and intermediate points. Dismissed as not 
within the jurisdiction of the Commission. No. 7041. 

Dr. Mary Martin Sloop v. Linville Valley Power Company. In re taking 
over Pineola electric customers. Dismissed as not within jurisdiction of 
the Commission. No. 6919. 

Maiden Milling and Manufacturing Company to the Commission. Com- 
plaint of discrimination in service and rates. Dismissed as not within the 
jurisdiction of the Commission. No. 7063. 

H. F. Carpenter v. Nantahala Power and Light Company. In re agree- 
ment between Sweetwater Valley citizens as to building electric light line 
into valley. Dismissed as not within the jurisdiction of the Commission. 
No. 6936. 

National Public Utilities Corporation to the Commission. Following rates 
filed and approved: Supplement No. 2, Henderson and Oxford Gas Com- 
pany, Henderson. Supplement No. 2, Elizabeth and Suburban Gas Company, 
Elizabeth City. Supplement No. 3, North Carolina Gas Company, Reids- 
ville Division. Supplement No. 3, North Carolina Gas Company, Lexing- 
ton Division. No. 7019. 

Mrs. J. E. Keigh v. North Carolina Public Service Company. Complaint 
of gas and electric bill. Dismissed. No. 6929. 

S. 0. Schaub v. North Carolina Public Service Company. In re gas 
pressure on customer's meters. Adjusted. No. 6960. 

Brown's Hosiery Mills, Incorporated v. North Carolina Public Service 
Company. Complaint as to meter service. Adjusted. No. 7136. 

Northwest Carolina Utilities to the Commission. Rates for Blowing Rock, 
Franklin and Roaring Gap filed and approved. No. 6924. Also No. 7287. 

Northwest Carolina Utilities to the Commission. Electric light and power 
rates for Sparta filed and approved. No. 7127. 

Priscilla Shaw, Silver Pines Camp, v. Northwest Carolina Utilities, In- 
corporated. Complaint of service at Camp. Adjusted. No. 6980. 

Tennessee Mineral Products Corporation v. Northwest Carolina Utilities, 
Incorporated. Request for Rates. Adjusted. No. 7069. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 115 

C. W. Hunt V. Northwest Carolina Utilities, Incorporated. Complaint of 
'excessive charges. Dismissed. No. 7167. 

Piedmont Utilities Company to the Commission. Rates for Hickory, West 
Hickory, Highland, Longview, Conover, Lenoir, Granite Falls and Hudson, 
filed and approved. No. 7046. 

Raleigh Gas Company to the Commission. Rates for general gas service 
for Raleigh filed and approved. No. 7110. 

0. K. LaRoque v. Raleigh Gas Company. Complaint of Gas bills. Ad- 
justed. No. 7081. 

Mrs. A. M. Frye v. Smoky Mountain Power Company. Complaint as to 
electric bills. Adjusted. No. 6997. 

South East Public Service Company to the Commission. Approval of 
General Exchange Tariff for the following towns : Asheboro, Boonville, Candor, 
Creedmoor, Eagle Springs, Elkin, Leaksville, Mocksville, Mount Airy, Mount 
Gilead, North Wilkesboro, Pilot Mountain, Ramseur, Rural Hall, Sparta, Troy, 
West End, West Jefferson, Yadkinville. 

Also approval of Local Exchange Tariff for the following towns: Ashe- 
boro, Boonville, Candor, Creedmoor, Eagle Springs, Elkin (Jonesville), 
Leaksville (Draper and Spray), Mocksville, Mount Airy, Mount Gilead, 
North Wilkesboro (Wilkesboro), Pilot Mountain, Ramseur, Rural Hall, 
Sparta, Troy, West End, West Jefferson (Jefferson), Yadkinville. No. 7076. 

South East Public Service Company to the Commission. Schedules of 
electric rates at Albemarle filed and approved. No. 7214. 

South East Public Service Company to the Commission. Schedule of 
rates for Rural Hall filed and approved. No. 7260. 

South East Public Service Company to the Commission. Application for 
change in tariff schedule by cancellation of Schedules 1 to 8, inclusive, 
and filing in lieu thereof service classifications A to G, and Rules 1 to 
21, inclusive, effective June 21, 1932. Approved. No. 7300. 

Southern Public Utilities Company to the Commission. Electric and 
water rates for Rutherfordton and Spindale filed and approved. No. 7048. 

Southern Public Utilities Company to the Commission. Electric rates 
for Leaksville, Spray, Draper and vicinity, filed and approved. No. 7085. 

Southern Public Utilities Company to the Commission. Rates for general 
gas service and industrial gas in Charlotte, Mount Airy, Greensboro, High 
Point, Winston-Salem, Graham, Salisbury and Burlington, filed and ap- 
proved. No. 7102. 

Mrs. Carrie Thrash Dorsett v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Com- 
plaint of discontinuance of service to residences near Davidson River. 
Adjusted. No. 6948. 

Ernest B. Baity v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint of dis- 
crimination in rates. Adjusted. No. 7021. 

J. E. Alexander v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint of 
change in gas meter. Adjusted. No. 7042. 

T. 0. Whisnant v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint of rate 
as to installation of electric range and rate for same. Dismissed. No. 7070. 

S. H. Kress & Company v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Request 
for information as to interpretation of minimum charges in certain electric 
schedules. Furnished. Closed. No. 7097. 



116 N. C. Corporation Commission 

J. W. Dellinger & Sons v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint 
of rate for refrigerator power. Adjusted. No. 7105. 

T. P. Williamson v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint of 
excessive charges. Dismissed. No. 7157. 

Ravineside Poultry Farm v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Com- 
plaint of discrimination as to service. Dismissed. No. 7133. 

Efird and Liipfert v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint of 
electric light service. Dismissed. No. 7206. 

Denton Ice and Coal Company v. Southern Public Utilities Company. 
Complaint of rate for power for ice plant. Dismissed. No. 7314. 

H. E. Cartland v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint as to 
rates. Adjusted. No. 7302. 

Southern States Power Company v. Nantahala Power Company. Com- 
plaint in re extension of power lines into Regal. Withdrawn. No. 7145. 

Southern States Power Company to the Commission. Schedule L. P. No. 
2, Large Miscellaneous Power Rates, filed and approved. No. 7252. 

Tide Water Power Company to the Commission. Reduction in optional 
gas storage water heater rate for Wrightsville Beach and Harbor Island. 
Approved. No. 7111. 

Tide Water Power Company to the Commission. Application for cer- 
tificate of convenience and necessity covering acquisition of electric distribu- 
tion system and water plant and water distribution system in town of 
Snow Hill. Granted. No. 7138. 

Tide Water Power Company to the Commission. Application for cer- 
tificate of convenience and necessity covering acquisition of the electric 
plant and electric distribution system and the water plant and water dis- 
tribution system in town of Morehead City. Granted. No. 7144. 

Tide Water Power Company to the Commission. Schedule of rates for 
Morehead City and Beaufort filed and approved. No. 7186. 

Tide Water Power Company to the Commission. Commercial cooking 
rates filed and approved. No. 7203. 

Tide Water Power Company to the Commission. Acquisition of purchase 
by said company of the electric distribution system at Newport, Carteret 
County. No. 7216. 

Tide Water Power Company to the Commission. House heating rate 
"G" filed and approved. No. 7310. 

Dunn Ice and Fuel Company v. Tide Water Power Company. Complaint 
of electric service at White Lake. Adjusted. No. 6913. 

H. V. Conly v. Tide Water Power Company. Complaint of failure of 
constant frequency in current. Dismissed. No. 6991. 

H. E. Coward v. Tide Water Power Company. Complaint of difference 
in electric rates for Pink Hill and Seven Springs. Dismissed. No. 7086. 

A. Z. Jarman v. Tide Water Power Company. Complaint of power service. 
Adjusted. No. 7146. 

J. W. Gafclin v. Tide Water Power Company. Complaint of light service. 
Dismissed. No. 7176. 

Town of Hockerton v. Tide Water Power Company. Complaint of charge 
to town for electric current for resale. Dismissed. No. 7230. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 117 

Virginia Electric and Power Company to the Commission. Cancellation 
of rates for "B" Territory and substitution therefor of standard rates 
applicable to Class "A" Territory. Granted. No. 6949. 

Virginia Electric and Power Company to the Commission. Industrial 
Rate 1000-K. Off-peak Power Rider No. 1. Filed and approved. No. 6982. 

Virginia Electric and Power Company to the Commission. Plan for house 
wiring for serving electric ranges and water heaters. Approved. No. 7032. 

Virginia Electric and Power Company to the Commission. Power rate, 
ice manufacturing, industrial rate No. 500-K. Filed and approved. No. 7233. 

Virginia Electric and Power Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to cancel 1000-K. Approved. No. 7270. 

Virginia Electric and Power Company to the Commission. Time con- 
trolled storage w^ater heating service rate schedule. Filed and approved. 
No. 7282. 

Virginia Electric and Power Company to the Commission. Revised 
electric rates filed and approved. No. 7303. 

Scotland Neck Water and Light Commission v. Virginia Electric and 
Power Company. In re rates. Adjusted. No. 6908. 

Helen Clark v. Virginia Electric and Power Company. Complaint of light 
service. Dismissed. No. 6947. 

S. C. Smithson v. Virginia Electric and Power Company. Complaint of 
electric service. Adjusted. No. 6977. 

Clyde Smithson v. Virginia Electric and Power Company. Request for 
lights at cotton gin. Dismissed. No. 7141. 

Home Milling Company v. Virginia Electric and Power Company. Com- 
plaint of rate in connection with grist mill. Dismissed. No. 7223. 

Express Companies 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue all-year agency at Moultonville. Granted. No. 6931. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue agency at Corinth. Granted. No. 6937. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Center Hill. Granted. No. 6938. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue agency at Councils. Granted. No. 6951. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Willow Springs. Granted. No. 6954. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close office at Pactolus. Granted. No. 6956. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Fuquay Springs. Granted. No. 7010. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Holly Springs. Granted. No. 7011 1^. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue agency at Snow Hill. Granted. No. 7092. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue agency at Ryland. Granted. No. 7120. 



118 JSr. C. CoKPORATioN Commission 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue agency at Knightdale. Granted. No. 7135. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue agency at Pleasant Hill. Granted. No. 7139. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue agency at Hobbsville. Granted. No. 7142. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Abbottsburg. Granted. No. 7143. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Glendon. Granted. No. 7151. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Proctorville. Granted. No. 7177. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue agency at Ridgeway. As application by Seaboard Air Line 
Railway Company to discontinue its agency was withdrawn, petition de- 
nied. No. 7188. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Office at Winnabow, being 
joint with an outsider, closed on account of resignation of agent and 
inability to obtain suitable representation. Approved. No. 7190. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Office at Evergreen, being 
joint with outsider, closed on account of resignation of agent and inability 
to obtain suitable representation. Approved. No. 7192. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Green Mountain. Withdrawn. No. 7217. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Kona. Granted. No. 7218. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue agency at Eure. Granted. No. 7241. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Snowden. Granted. No. 7255. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Linden. Granted. No. 7263. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application with reference 
to proposed change in agency at Smithfield. Granted. No. 7276. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Grimesland. Granted. No. 7283. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Simms. Granted. No. 7296. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Micro. Granted. No. 7308. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Office at Godwin, being 
joint with an outsider, closed on account of resignation of agent and in- 
ability to obtain suitable representation. Approved. No. 7323. 

Railway Express Agency to the Commission. Offices at South Winston- 
Salem and Southmont discontinued, due to the fact that exclusive passenger 
train service on Winston-Salem Southbound Railway was discontinued. 
Approved. No. 7346. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Henderson. Approved. No. 6934. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 119 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Horse Shoe. Granted. No. 6981. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Penrose. Granted. No. 6983. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to discontinue agency at Ellenboro. Granted. No. 7020. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Gilkey. Granted. No. 7025. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Mooresboro. Granted. No. 7043. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Burch. Granted. No. 7054. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Elmwood. Granted. No. 7169. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Morrisville. Granted. No. 7305. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Almond. Granted. No. 7333. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Judson. "Granted. No. 7334. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to discontinue agency at Trinity. Granted. No. 7347. 

James S. Milliken v. Southeastern Express Company. Complaint of delay 
in shipment. Adjusted. No. 7064. 

Pullman Company 

W. E. Lynch v. The Pullman Company. Complaint of operation of Pull- 
man in charge of porter. Adjusted. No. 6966. 

Telegraph Companies 

Postal Telegraph-Cable Company to the Commission. Schedules of Long- 
Distance Telephone Rates filed and approved. No. 6979. 

Postal Telegraph-Cable Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close seasonal office at Mount Olive. Granted. No. 7312. 

Western Union Telegraph Company to the Commission. Application for 
approval of arrangement to close office at Cedar Falls as railroad-telegraph 
office, continuing same as commercial telegraph office as agent at said point 
was telegraph operator. Approved. No. 6393. 

Western Union Telegraph Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Caroleen. Granted. No. 7018. 

Western Union Telegraph Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to close agency at Walkertown. Granted. No. 7123. 

Western Union Telegraph Company to the Commission. Rates for serial 
service filed and approved. No. 7164. 

Western Union Telegraph Company to the Commission. Rates for timed 
wire service filed and approved. No, 7166. 



120 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Citizens of Morrisville v. Western Union Telegraph Company. Complaint 
of discontinuance of telegraph service. Adjusted. No. 7198. 

Telephone Companies 

IN THE MATTER OP THE PETITION OF THE CAROLINA TELEPHONE 
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY FOR A CHANGE IN EXCHANGE SERV- 
ICE RATES AT COLUMBIA, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Ordee 

The Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company purchased the Columbia 
Exchange some time ago and has rebuilt the outside plant and made the 
improvements necessary to furnishing continuous and more satisfactory 
service. This plant was in very bad condition and its being taken over 
by this company was welcomed by the people in the community, as is 
evidenced by records in this office, showing that the rates requested in 
this petition were concurred in by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen; 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted and that the petitioner, effective 
December 1, 1930, be, and is hereby, authorized to charge within the base 
rate area, the approved excess mileage rates being applicable in addition 
thereto beyond the base rate area, the following monthly rental rates on 
its exchange located at Columbia, North Carolina: 

Business, Special Line $3.25 per month 

Residence, Special Line 2.00 per month 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 26th day of November, 1930. Glerh. 

Docket No. 6972. 

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE CAROLINA TELEPHONE 
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY FOR A CHANGE IN EXCHANGE SERV- 
ICE RATES AT ROANOKE RAPIDS, NORTH CAROLINA, AND WEL- 
DON, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

The Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company in this case petitions 
the Commission for the establishment of rates on its exchange service at 
Roanoke Rapids and Weldon, North Carolina. 

On account of the growth in both of these towns, there has been a demand 
for increased telephone facilities and an improvement in both local and 
long distance service within the base rate areas. At Weldon, a modern 
fire proof building has been equipped with modern toll switchboard. Neces- 
sary long distance repeaters for improved long distance service over the 
toll lines of the petitioner and the American -Telephone and Telegraph 
Company have been installed and there has been erected in Roanoke Rapids 
a semi-fire-proof building for housing automatic telephone equipment. The 
rebuilding of the outside plants in both towns, substitution of cable for 
open wire distribution, making a joint contract with power companies 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 121 

for the use of joint poles within the corporate limits of both towns in 
order to reduce pole and line equipment to a minimum, and adequate 
trunk line facilities between the two exchanges gives evidence that the 
company desires to make this service one hundred per cent efficient. 

The petition is supported by resolutions passed by the mayors and boards 
of aldermen of both towns, approving the rates requested; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted and that the petitioner, effective 
December 1, 1930, be, and is hereby, authorized to charge within the base 
rate areas of the two towns, the approved excess mileage rates being ap- 
plicable in addition thereto beyond the base rate areas, on the above-named 
exchanges, the following monthly rental rates: 

Business, Special Line $4.50 per month 

Business, Two-party Line 4.00 per month 

Residence, Special Line 3.00 per month 

Residence, TVo-party Line 2.50 per month 

Residence, Four-party Line 2.00 per month 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 26th day of November, 1930. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6973. 

IN RE: PETITION OP CAROLINA TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH 
COMPANY FOR A CHANGE IN EXCHANGE SERVICE RATES AT 
FOUNTAIN, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

The petition of the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company for change 
in exchange service rates at Fountain, North Carolina, was duly filed with the 
Commission on April 18, 1931, to which was attached a petition, signed 
by what was represented to be a majority of the subscribers to the service 
in the Town of Fountain, signifying their desire to have the telephone 
plant rebuilt and an automatic, or dial, service installed and, also, indicating 
their willingness to pay the schedule of rates which the Carolina Telephone 
and Telegraph Company has requested the Commission to approve. 

The Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company has notified the Com- 
mission that the transfer to the automatic equipment was made on February 
7, 1931, and that inasmuch as the majority of the rates formerly charged 
by the Fountain Telephone Company were in excess of those proposed, 
has requested the approval of the proposed rates, effective March 1, 1931; 
therefore it is 

Ordered, That the following monthly rental rates are hereby approved for 
application by the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company in the Town 
of Fountain, North Carolina, within the base rate area of one mile from the 
central office, effective March 1, 1931: 

Business, Special Line $3.50 

Business, Party Line 3.00 

Residence, Special Line 2.25 

Residence, Party Line 1.75 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 24th day of April, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7049. 



122 N". C. CoEPOKATioN Commission 

IN RE: PETITION OF THE CAROLINA TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH 
COMPANY FOR A CHANGE IN EXCHANGE SERVICE RATES AT 
GRIFTON, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

The petition of the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company for change 
in exchange service rates at Grifton, North Carolina, was duly filed with 
the Commission on April 18, 1931, to which was attached a resolution of 
the Board of Aldermen of Grifton, North Carolina, signed by the Mayor 
and Clerk, approving the schedule of rates proposed in the petition; there- 
fore, it is 

Ordered, That the following monthly rental rates are hereby approved for 
application by the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company in the Town 
of Grifton, North Carolina, within the base rate area of one mile from the 
central office, effective May 1, 1931: 

Business, Special Line $3 50 

Business, Party Line 3.00 

Residence, Special Line 2.25 

Residence, Party Line 1.75 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 24th day of April, 1931. Clerh. 

Docket No. 7050. 

IN RE: PETITION OF CAROLINA TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH 
COMPANY FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF TELEPHONE RATES ON 
ITS NEW EXCHANGE AT LUCAMA, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

This is a petition of the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company for 
the approval of a rate schedule on its exchange at Lucama, North Carolina. 

Before this exchange was built, the Company circulated a petition to ascer- 
tain the number of people who would subscribe for service, and after obtain- 
ing a list of seventy-two subscribers, placed its order for material and 
has now built the exchange. The rates, which are being asked for, were 
approved by the seventy-two subscribers at the time that they petitioned 
for the service, and the Company built its exchange with these rates in 
view; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petitioner be, and is hereby, authorized to charge for 
monthly rental on its Lucama exchange, effective as of the beginning of 
the service, as follows: 

Business, Special Line $3.50 per month 

Business, Party Line 3.00 per month 

Residence, Special Line 2.25 per month 

Residence, Party Mne 1.75 per month 

These rates are to apply to all business and residence subscribers located 
within three miles radius of the central office. Beyond the three mile radius 
$.25 will be added for each mile or fraction thereof per month. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 15th day of May, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7024. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 123 

IN RE: PETITION OF THE CAROLINA TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH 
COMPANY FOR A CHANGE IN EXCHANGE SERVICE RATES AT RICH 
SQUARE, WOODLAND, CONWAY, AND ROXOBEL, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Several years ago, the petitioner purchased four exchanges formerly owned 
and operated by the Roanoke-Chowan Telephone Company in the towns of 
Rich Square, Woodland, Conway, and Roxohel, North Carolina, and certain 
toll circuits connected thereto. In order to meet the demands for additional 
and continuous twenty-four hour service and to improve the service in con- 
nection therewith, the outside properties at these exchanges have been 
rebuilt and automatic, or dial, system exchanges have been established at 
all these places, except Rich Square, where a common battery system was 
installed, as conditions were not such at Rich Square as would justify an 
automatic installation. Suitable rented quarters have been leased at all 
points with the exception of Conway, at which place it was necessary to 
erect a one-story fire proof building. Adequate toll facilities have been 
provided between these exchanges and from the operating center of Rich 
Square to Weldon. This work has been under way since last fall. Rich 
Square having been completed in January; Woodland, in February; Conway, 
during March; and Roxobel is just about complete, although service has 
not been transferred from the old to the new plant. 

When this property was acquired, the questions of rebuilding the plants 
and rates commensurate to the cost necessary to put the plants in proper 
condition were taken up with the mayors and boards of aldermen of all 
four of the towns and they, by resolution, not only requested that the service 
be improved but in that way, approved the rates herein requested by the 
petitioner; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be, and it is hereby, granted, effective June 
1, 1931, and that the petitioner be, and is hereby, authorized to collect the 
following monthly rental rates on each of the exchanges named above, 
applicable to all subscribers within the base rate area of one mile from the 
central office in each town, excess mileage rates being applicable beyond 
the base rate area: 

Business, Special Line $3.50 per month 

Business, Two-party Line 3.00 per month 

Residence, Special Line 2.25 per month 

Residence, Two-party Line 1.75 per month 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 31st day of May, 1931. Glerh. 

Docket No. 7084. 

IN RE: PETITION OF CAROLINA TELEPH0N:E AND TELEGRAPH 
COMPANY FOR A CHANGE IN EXCHANGE SERVICE RATES AT 
WINTON, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

This petition was filed after rebuilding the entire outside plant and in- 
stalling automatic equipment in a rented building. Service was established 
on this rebuilt exchange on December 22, 1931. 



124 ^N". C. Corporation Commission 

Dated December 12, 1929, the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the Town 
of Winton passed a resolution, authorizing certain rates on this exchange 
when the company would rebuild its outside plant and install automatic 
equipment. Since this has been done, the company has applied for the 
rate agreed upon by the city officials and the petitioner at that time. The 
record in this office discloses the fact that there are thirty-five business and 
residence phones now on this exchange; therefore, it is thought that the rates 
requested will not produce more than sufficient revenue to maintain the 
operation of the exchange. It is, therefore. 

Ordered, That, effective January 1, 1932, the Carolina Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company is, hereby, authorized to charge the following monthly rental 
rates within the base rate area of one mile from the central office of its 
Winton, North Carolina, exchange; and that the General Exchange Tariff 
rates in effect on the company's lines be effective outside the said base 
rate area: 

Business, Special Line $3.50 per month 

Business, Party Line 3.00 per month 

Residence, Special Line 2.25 per month 

Residence, Party Line 1,75 per month 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 1st day of January, 1932 Clerk. 

Docket No. 7184. 

IN RE: PETITION CAROLINA TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COM- 
PANY FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF REWSED TELEPHONE RATES FOR 
ITS AULANDER, NORTH CAROLINA, EXCHANGE. 

Order 

This is a petition of the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company for 
the establishment of telephone rates applicable to its rebuilt plant and 
exchange in the Town of Aulander, North Carolina; and, since the rates 
requested were agreed to by all except one of the subscribers on the ex- 
change prior to the rebuilding of the plant, and inasmuch as they are in 
line with rates of the petitioner on other similar exchanges owned and 
operated by it, conditioned upon the petitioner giving twenty-four hour service 
to the subscribers on this exchange, it is 

Ordered, That the said petition is hereby granted and the petitioner will 
be permitted to charge the following monthly rental rates for the following 
classes of service, effective April 1, 1932: 

Business, Special Line $3.50 per month 

Business, Party Line 3.00 per month 

Residence, Special Line 2.25 per month 

Residence, Party Line 1.75 per month 

The above rates shall be applicable to the base rate area of one mile 
from the central office; beyond the base rate area, the petitioner's regular 
line mileage charges shall apply. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 25th day of March, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7247. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 125 

FREMONT TELEPHONE COMPANY V. CAROLINA TELEPHONE AND 
TELEGRAPH COMPANY 

Order 

The petition was filed in this cause on March 13, 1928. Evidence was heard 
on March 20, 1929. On November 15, 1929, an order was entered granting 
the petition. Exceptions to this order were filed by the respondent on Jan- 
uary 2, 1930, and a hearing on said exceptions was held on February 18, 
1930. On March 24, 1930, the Commission entered an order, revoking the 
previous order and dismissing the petition. Exceptions were filed by the 
petitioner on April 4, 1930. On June 5, 1930, these exceptions came on 
for hearing and the Commission intimated that it desired to hear from 
the petitioner only as to the relief prayed for in Paragraph Eleven of the 
original petition and set such hearing for August 14, 1930. At the same 
time, the Commission reserved its ruling on all exceptions filed by either 
party until after the hearing on August 14, 1930, and until the entering of 
the final order herein by the Commission. 

On August 14, 1930, the matter of the relief prayed for in Paragraph Eleven 
came on for hearing before the Commission. From evidence introduced at 
this hearing and at the previous hearings, the Commission finds the fol- 
lowing facts: 

First: That at the present time the Fremont Telephone Company 
has toll lines extending from Fremont to Stantonsburg and from Stan- 
tonsburg to Wilson, where connection is made with the Carolina Tele- 
» phone and Telegraph Company. 

Second: That the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company ac- 
cents from the Fremont Telephone Company at Wilson messages orig- 
inating on the Stantonsburg Exchange, but refuses to accept at its Wilson 
Exchange, over the lines of the Fremont Telephone Company, messages 
originating at Fremont. 

As the Commission can see no reason why messages originating on the 
lines of the Fremont Telephone Company may not be delivered over its 
own lines to the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company; to do so 
will be in accordance with the general practice of telephone and telegraph 
companies; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company be, and it 
is hereby, ordered to receive for delivery or dispatch at its Wilson Exchange 
messages originating on the lines of the Fremont Telephone Company and 
transmitted over said lines through the Stantonsburg Exchange. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 19th day of December, 1930. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6666. 

IN RE: FREMONT TELEPHONE COMPANY v. CAROLINA TELEPHONE 
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY 

Order 

Upon motion of attorneys for respondent for additional time in which 
to file exceptions to the order of the Commission in this matter of December 



126 N. C. Corporation Commission 

19, 1930, motion having been considered in connection with certain facts 
which the said respondent's attorneys have requested the Commission to 
consider, extension of time is hereby granted for a period of thirty days 
from date. 

By order of the- Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 30th day of December, 1930. Clerk. 

Docket No. G666. 

FREMONT TELEPHONE COMPANY, Petitioner, v. CAROLINA TELEPHONE^ 
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY, Respondent 

Order Overruling Exceptions 

The respondent comes into our court and avers that the Order of this 
Commission, dated December 19, 1930 is based upon insufficient findings of 
fact and requests this Commission to find additional facts. 

This Commission having found such facts as it deemed necessary upon 
which to base its said Order, and it appearing that any additional findings 
of fact can avail nothing to respondent if such respondent appeals, as the 
trial in the appellate court is de novo, and the law not requiring a vain 
thing, it is, therefore, 

Ordered, That the exceptions be overruled and the request of respondent 
be denied. It is 

Further Ordered. That respondent have thirty days from date hereof to 
perfect its appeal. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 19th day of January, 1931. Clerh. 

Docket No. 6666. 

W. H. OGSBURY AND OTHER CITIZENS OP HOPE VALLEY, Petitioners, 
V. INTERSTATE TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY, Re- 
spondent. 

Order 

This cause coming before the Corporation Commission for hearing and 
being heard on the seventeenth day of November, 1931, on the petition of 
various citizens, residents and property owners of Hope Valley, a suburb 
of the City of Durham, North Carolina, and the answer to said petition, 
filed by the Interstate Telephone and Telegraph Company, of Durham; the 
petitioners being represented by Messrs. Long & Young and the respondent 
by Mr. B. M. Watkins, of Durham. 

From the admissions in the pleadings and the admissions of counsel at 
the hearing, the Commission finds the following facts: 

1. That Hope Valley is principally a residential section, located near 
the City of Durham, North Carolina, but outside its corporate limits 
and several miles from the central office of the respondent com.pany; 

2. That Hope Valley was promoted by Hope Valley, Incorporated, a 
privately owned corporation. Which sold lots in Hope Valley to the 
petitioners, who are now owners of lots purchased from said Hope 
Valley, Incorporated; 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 127 

3. That at the time of the sale of lots to the various individuals, 
who are now petitioners, Hope Valley, Incorporated, entered into an 
agreement with the Interstate Telephone and Telegraph Company where- 
by the latter was to, and did, construct two telephone lines from its 
exchange in Durham to Hope Valley, the expense of the construction 
of said two lines being borne by said Hope Valley, Incorporated; 

4. That later, when the settlement had 'grown and the demand for 
telephone service had increased, the respondent company, upon its own 
initiative, at its own expense, and without any contract with Hope 
Valley, Incorporated, constructed a third line from its Durham exchange 
to Hope Valley; 

5. That at all times from the beginning of the service the rental 
contracts were made with the subscribers direct and the rentals and 
other charges were, and are now, paid by the various individual sub- 
scribers direct to the respondent company; 

6. That there are at present about thirty subscribers in Hope Valley 
on said three lines, affording a ten-party line service only; and 

7. That the present service is grossly inadequate for the needs of the 
present telephone subscribers at Hope Valley; 

Wherefore, from the above facts, which were admitted, the Commission 
IS of the opinion, and so holds, that the respondent having extended its line 
from Durham to Hope Valley and having offered to sell and did sell telephone 
service to various citizens in Hope Valley, that it can not now discontinue 
said service; that since it is required to give service, the service must be 
adequate for the needs of the subscribers, which adequate service is not 
now being given. Now, therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the respondent be, and is hereby, required to improve, 
within the next sixty days from the date of this order, the character of 
telephone service it now extends to the Hope Valley community so that 
the maximum number of subscribers served by any party line shall not 
exceed four; and, it is 

Further Ordered, That the said respondent so improve the character of 
the telephone service it now extends to the Hope Valley community, within 
six months from the date of this order, as to be able to offer the same 
classes of service to any of its said subscribers as are now being offered 
to its subscribers on its exchange within the corporate limits of the 
City of Durham. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self. 

This 8th day of December, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7124. 

APPLICATION OF THE CABARRUS BANK AND TRUST COMPANY, AS 
TRUSTEE, FOR A CERTIFICATE OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND 
NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF THE TELEPHONE PROPERTY 
FORMERLY OWNED BY THE ALBEMARLE TELEPHONE COMPANY, 
A NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE STOCK- 
HOLDERS OF SAID ALBEMARLE TELEPHONE COMPANY IN LIQUI- 
DATION, AND FOR AUTHORITY TO TRANSFER THE SAID PROP- 
ERTY TO THE SOUTH EAST PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY. 

Order 
The Cabarrus Bank and Trust Company, as Trustee, makes application 
for certificate of public convenience and necessity for the acquisition of 



128 I^. C. Corporation Commission 

the Albemarle Telephone Company to be held in trust by it for the stock- 
holders of the said Albemarle Telephone Company during liquidation, and 
for authority to transfer the said property to the South East Public Service 
Company. 

The petitioner has complied with the Commission's Rules of Practice, and 
filed the information desired, and after due consideration finds that publie 
convenience and necessity requires the granting of said petition; there- 
fore, it is 

Ordeeed, That the same be granted effective as of December 28, 1931. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 16th day of December, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7180. 

IN RE: APPLICATION OF THE SOUTH EAST PUBLIC SERVICE COM- 
PANY FOR CERTIFICATE OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND NECES- 
SITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF THE TELEPHONE PROPERTY FOR- 
MERLY OWNED BY THE ALBEMARLE TELEPHONE COMPANY, A 
NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION, NOW BEING HELD IN TRUST BY 
CABARRUS BANK AND TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE. 

Order 

The above named applicant, the South East Public Service Company, filed 
application on December 11, 1931, requesting that the transfer of the property 
of the Albemarle Telephone Company be made to the Cabarrus Bank and 
Trust Company as Trustee pending certain negotiations. This order was 
issued December 16, 1931, by this Commission and by this reference is made 
a part hereof. 

Now comes the Cabarrus Bank and Trust Company of Albemarle, N. C, 
as Trustee certifying that the object for which it had been made Trustee 
has been consummated, and the South East Public Service Company requests 
an additional certificate of public convenience and necessity for the acquisi- 
tion of the property now held by the said Cabarrus Bank and Trust Com- 
pany as Trustee. 

Upon the consideration of the Commission, it appears that the require- 
ments of the statute have been fully met, and the Commission finds that 
public convenience and necessity requires the granting of said petition; 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the South East Public Service Company, a West Virginia 
Corporation, with headquarters at Charlottesville, Virginia, be and the same 
is, hereby, authorized to acquire the said property. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

This 28th day of December, 1931. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7180. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 129 

IN RE: PETITION OF THE TOWN OF LINCOLNTON v. THE SOUTHERN 

BELL TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY REDUCTION OF 

RATES. 

Order 

This is the petition of the Town of Lincolnton for a reduction of rates 
on the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company, Lincolnton, 
Exchange. 

Hearing was held by the Commission and the principal point of controversy 
was the agreement between the officials of the old Piedmont Company and 
the Town of Lincolnton, dated March 3, 1916, which provided that when 
the number of stations reached 800 that the rates should not exceed the 
rates charged by the Southern Bell on other similar exchanges. 

This property was acquired by the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company through consolidation with the Piedmont Telephone and Telegraph 
Company; the Piedmont Telephone and Telegraph Company having made 
an agreement with the officials of the Town of Lincolnton with reference 
to an increase in rates as the number of telephone stations increased. 

The present rates were put into effect by the Commission upon the 
presentation by the respondent in this case of a resolution passed by the 
Board of Aldermen of the Town of Lincolnton, dated May 18, 1926, which 
gave the approval of the said Board of Aldermen to the rates now in 
effect. The present rates were authorized by the Commission and ordered 
into effect, subject to hearing upon complaint, on May 25, 1926. 

From the evidence presented at this time it develops that the number of 
stations have now decreased to a point below the 800 number agreed to in 
the March 3, 1916 agreement and the City contends that the rule should 
work both ways. That it agreed to an increase when the number ran up 
to 800 or more and that the respondent's rates should now be decreased 
since the number of stations has been considerably reduced. The Commis- 
sion finds that this number has been reduced since the advent of the de- 
pression, and it finds further that the rates now being charged on the 
Lincolnton Exchange are somewhat out of line with those rates being 
charged by the respondent on other exchanges of approximately similar 
size. 

Therefore it is Now Ordeeeb, That the respondent, the Southern Bell Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company shall extend to its subscribers on the Lincoln- 
ton Exchange rates, effective August 1, 1932, as follows: 

A. Within the Base Rate Area, monthly rental rates as follows: 
Individual 2-Party 'rP^^^ty 

Line Line Line 

Business $3.60 $3.00 $ 

Residence 2.25 2.00 1.75 

B. The rates outside the base area shall be the same as the rates 
inside, together with established mileage charges as specified in the 
Central Exchange Tariff. 

C. The rates for service and equipment, not specifically specified 
herein shall be governed by the General Exchange Tariff on file with, 
and approved by this Commission. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This the 8th day of July, 1932. Clerk. 

Docket No. 7178. 



130 i^. C. Corporation Commission 

W. F. Mitchell v. Appalachian Telephone Company. Complaint as to rates. 
Adjusted. No. 6899. 

Welch Galloway v. Appalachian Telephone Company. Complaint of service 
in Candler section. Dismissed. No. 7165. 

Banner Elk Telephone Company to the Commission. Rates for Banner 
Elk filed and approved. No. 7000. 

Cane Creek Telephone and Light Company v. Carolina Power & Light 
Company. Complaint as to lines interfering with telephone service. Ad- 
justed. No. 6909. 

E. R. Thomas Drug Company v. Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Complaint of service. Adjusted. No. 7148. 

J. H. Bridgers v. Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of charge for changing name of subscriber to telephone. Dismissed. 
No. 7149. 

T. C. Clute V. Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint of 
discrimination in rates. Adjusted. No. 7243. 

Charles G. Royster v. Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of excessive charges. Dismissed. No. 7301. 

Central Carolina Telephone Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue unlimited service between Gibsonville and 
Burlington. Granted. No. 7129. 

Cameron Drug Store v. Central Carolina Telephone Company. Application 
for pay station in drug store. Dismissed. No. 6915. 

Citizens of Summerfield v. Central Carolina Telephone Company. Com- 
plaint as to toll charge to Greensboro. Adjusted. No. 7022. 

J. T. Underwood v. Central Carolina Telephone Company. Complaint of 
service. Withdrawn. No. 7254. 

Citizens of Marshville v Central Carolina Telephone Company. Petition 
for reduction in rates. Denied. No. 7264. 

S. W. Robertson v. Columbus Telephone Company. Complaint of service. 
Adjusted. No. 7117. 

G. L. Lipe V. Concord Telephone Company. Complaint of charge for 
connection with rural telephone at China Grove. Dismissed. No. 7316. 

J. A. Campbell v. Eagle Springs Telephone Company. Complaint with 
reference to discontinuance of service for non-payment of bill. Dismissed. 
No. 7275. 

Fremont Telephone Company v. Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Toll Connection and Service. Certified to Superior Court of Wilson 
County. February, 1931. No. 6666. 

Fremont Telephone Company to the Commission. Reduction in rate 
on residence telephones at Stantonsburg filed and approved. No. 6995. 

Fremont Telephone Company to the Commission. Application to dis- 
continue Princeton Exchange. Allowed. No. 7294. 

Calvin Mitchell v. D. E. Graham and W. H. Clark, owners of Telephone 
Line. Complaint of service. Closed. No. 7338. 

Interstate Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. Schedule 
of service connection charges and charges for moves and changes, and 
Schedule of mileage charges, filed and approved. No. 7210. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints J 31 

A. A. McDonald v. Interstate Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of failure of telephone company to install telephone. Adjusted. 
No. 7213. 

McAlpine Telephone Company to the Commission. Rates for Waxhaw filed 
and approved. No. 7047. 

Monroe Telephone Company to the Commission. Discount on monthly 
rental bills filed and approved. No. 7286. 

L. F. Shinn v. Mooresville Telephone Company. Complaint of rate for 
service from Mooresville to Airport. Dismissed. No. 6907. 

North State Telephone Company to the Commission. Rates for telephone 
recorder service in High Point. Approved. No. 7242. 

Roberson, Haworth and Reese v. North State Telephone Company. Com- 
plaint of rates. Adjusted. No. 6971. 

Oakland Telephone Exchange v. Central Carolina Telephone Company. 
In re-routing toll messages. Dismissed. No. 6993. 

B. H. Scott and Mary H. Copeland v. Randolph Telephone Company. 
Complaint of service and rates. Dismissed. No. 6987. 

L. A. Covil V. Southern Appalachian Telephone Company. Complaint of 
increase in rates. Dismissed. No. 6903. 

Southern Appalachian Telephone Company to the Commission. Local 
and general exchange rate tariff filed and approved, subject to hearing upon 
complaint. No. 6910. 

Herman Weil v. Southern Appalachian Telephone Company. Complaint of 
service. Adjusted. No. 7083. 

R. Sidbury v. Southern Appalachian Telephone Company. Complaint in 
re telephone bill. Adjusted. No. 7134. 

Mountain Home v. Southern Appalachian Telephone Company. Complaint 
of service. Adjusted. No. 7224. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. 
Supplemental Local Exchange Tariff for Waynesville filed and approved. 
No. 6955. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. 
Petition for revision in exchange rates and base rate area in Greensboro. 
Withdrawn. No. 6976. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. 
Rates for new length cords filed and approved. No. 7014. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. 
Rates for teletypewriter service. Approved. No. 7171. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. 
Discontinuance of Sharon Telephone Company, Shelby. Approved. No. 7219. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. 
Discontinuance of service furnished the Pender Telephone Company. 
No. 7251. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. 
Requirements as to advance payments filed and approved. No, 7289. 

Town of Black Mountain v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Application for reduction in seasonal summer rates. Dismissed. 
No. 6809. 



132 _ 1^. C. Corporation Commission 

Franc L. Ives v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint with reference to installation of telephone. Dismissed. No. 6900. 

John P. Little v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of overcharge in rate. Adjusted. No. 6902. 

W. 0. Huske V. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of charge for seasonal rate at Wrightsville Beach. Adjusted. No. 6904. 

Mrs. O. L. Grubbs v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of telephone service. Adjusted. No. 6914. 

Mrs. W. T. Lynch v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of telephone service. Adjusted. No. 6918. 

W. A. Lytle v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Comp&ny. Com- 
plaint as to practice of company in service. Dismissed. No. 6921. 

Elon College v. Southern Bell Telephone Company. Complaint of tolls 
from Gibsonville to Burlington. Adjusted. No. 6922. 

E. B. Jeffress v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of rates. Adjusted. No. 6926. 

Wilkes Hosiery Mills Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. Complaint of long-distance service. Adjusted. No. 6928. 

Duke Endowment v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company, 
Discount on monthly charge to non-profit Hospitals. Dismissed. No. 6930. 

R. E. Price v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of switchboard and service in Rutherford County. Adjusted. No. 6959. 

C. T. Gwaltney v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of service in suburb of Asheville. Adjusted. No. 6963. 

Guy M. Beaty v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of increase in charges. Adjusted. No. 6975. 

Dr. Amos C. Duncan v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone in Forest City Hatchery. Telephone 
installed. No. 7005. 

J. T. Stewart v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of delay in installation of telephone. Adjusted. No. 7023. 

John W. Plummer v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of service at Carolina Beach. Adjusted. No. 7028. 

W. E. Breese v. Southern Bell Teiephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of service. Adjusted. No. 7037. 

Covington Motor Company, Incorporated v. Southern Bell Telephone and 
Telegraph Company. Complaint as to requirement for installation of tele- 
phone. Dismissed. No. 7080. 

Leazer Elevator Service v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Complaint of telephone rental rate. Adjusted. No. 7091. 

G. H. Ferguson v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of rates in Fairmont Section, Raleigh. Dismissed. No. 7131. 

J. Frank Houston v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of delay in installation of telephone. Adjusted. No. 7158. 

Peoples Drug Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Complaint of service. Adjusted. No. 7174. 

C. E. Lundy v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of rates. Adjusted. No. 7195. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 133 

Mrs. W. L. McFadden v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company 
and J. B. Whitesides, owner of Rural Lines. Complaint of service. Adjusted. 
No. 7215. 

W. R. Dockery v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for pay telephone station in Post Office at Marvel. Adjusted. 
No. 7246. 

H. M. Reddick v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of excessive charge. Adjusted. No. 7315. 

R. B. Scarborough v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Adjusted. No. 7331. 

Atkinson-Smith Lumber Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. Complaint of failure to issue directory. Adjusted. 
No. 7348. 

Wallace Telephone Company to the Commission. Reduction in telephone 
rates filed and approved. No. 6964. 

Mrs. W. L. McFadden v. J. Bryan Whiteside, Telephone Manager. Com- 
plaint of service. Adjusted. No. 6992. 

Yanceyville Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. Rates 
for Yanceyville filed and approved. No. 7098. 



TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT 

Supplement JHo. 1 to Circular No. 291 

Refer to Circular No. 291 and cancel therefrom ail rates on GROUND 
LIMESTONE, Carloads. In future apply commodity rates published in 
CIRCULAR No. 350, supplements thereto or reissues thereof. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued November 5, 1931. Clerk. 

Effective December 10, 1931. 

Supplement No* 1 to Circular No. 298 

(Cancels Circular No. 298) 

Supplement No. 1 to Circular No. 314 

Circular No. 298, containing rates on TAN BARK, Carload, is hereby 
canceled. In future apply rates published in Circular No. 314. Rates on 
Lumber and Articles taking Lumber Rates. 

Refer to Circular No. 314 and add to the description contained therein on 
lumber, the following: 

BARK, TAN, Carload, Minimum Weight as follows: 

Cars of 36 feet in length and over....24,000 pounds 
Cars under 36 feet in length 20,000 pounds 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued January 12, 1931. Clerk. 

Effective January 30, 1931. 

Supplement No. 1 to Circular No. 301 

(Cancels Circular No. 301) 

Circular No. 301, containing Maximum Freight Rates on BARRELS, 
EMPTY, WOODEN, CARLOAD, is hereby cancelled. In future apply CLASS 
RATES. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued July 10, 1931. Clerk. 

Effective July 30, 1931. 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON COTTON AND KNITTING 
FACTORY PRODUCTS 

Supplement No. 1 and cancellation of rates on Cotton Bagging (including 
brown cotton bagging) therein, are hereby cancelled. In future apply rates 
published in Circular No. 308. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued September 14, 1932. Clerk. 

Effective October 1, 1932. 

Supplement No. 2 to Circular No. 308 (Cancels Supplement No. 1). 



Freight Rates 135 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON FURNITURE AND FURNITURE PARTS, 
FINISHED OR IN THE WHITE, RATED FOURTH CLASS OR HIGHER, 
CARLOAD, IN SOUTHERN CLASSIFICATION; IN STRAIGHT OR 
MIXED CARLOADS, SUBJECT TO MINIMUM WEIGHTS AS PROVIDED 
IN SOUTHERN CLASSIFICATION, BUT NOT TO EXCEED 12,000 
POUNDS. SUBJECT TO RULE 34 OF SOUTHERN CLASSIFICATION. 

Rates published in Circular No. 312 are hereby suspended until September 
26, 1933, unless sooner cancelled, changed or extended. 
During period of suspension the basis below: 

Minimum weight 10,000 pounds 60 per cent of 1st class 

Minimum weight 12,000 pounds 55 per cent of 1st class 

Minimum weight 15,000 pounds 50 per cent of 1st class 

(See Note) shall apply on the following description: 

Furniture and Furniture Parts, rated fifty per cent of first class or 
higher, as described in Southern Classification under headings "Furniture," 
^'Furniture, Metallic or Wooden," and "Furniture Parts";, also Spring As- 
semblies, Cushion, mattress inner filler, or seat; in straight or mixed 
carloads; 

Also articles under said headings rated lower than fifty per cent of first 
class when shipped in mixed carloads with articles rated fifty per cent of 
first class or higher; Also Baby or Doll Carriages, Baby or Doll Go-Carts, 
Baby or Doll Sulkies, in straight or mixed carloads with furniture and furni- 
ture parts as described above. 

And 40 per cent of first class on: 

Metallic Furniture and Furniture Parts, rated fourth class or fifty per 
cent of first class, as described under headings "Furniture," "Furniture, 
Metallic or Wooden," and "Furniture Parts," in Southern Classification; 
Also Spring Assemblies, cushion, mattress inner filler, or seat; Also Furni- 
ture Casters; in straight or mixed carloads, minimum weight 20,000 pounds, 
(See Note.) 

Note. — The minimum weights to be flat minimums for all size cars and 
the two-for-one rule not to apply. 

These revised ratings will be subject to the following rule: 

When the carload charge based on the higher rate at actual weight 
(but not less than the minimum weight specified for the higher rate) 
exceeds the charge based on the lower rate at actual weight (but not 
less than the minimum weight specified for the lower rate), the latter 
charge will apply. 

For Rates see Agent F. L. Speiden's Freight Tariff No. 598-A, I. C. C. 
752 (Agent Cottrell's series), North Carolina Tariff, supplements to and 
future issues of the same. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued August 18, 1932. Clerk. 

Effective September 25, 1932. 

Supplement No. 1 to Circular No. 312. 



136 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Supplement No. 2 to Circular No, 322 

(Cancels Circular No. 322) 

Refer to Circular No. 322 and cancel all Commodity Rates on Charcoal, 
wood (not in tablets), Carload. IN FUTURE APPLY CLASS RATES. 
By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued February 19, 1931. Clerk. 

Effective March 10, 1931. 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON a.— COTTON TIES AND BUCKLES, 
IRON OR STEEL, COTTON BALING, WITH OR WITHOUT BUCKLES 
(ATTACHED), IN BUNDLES; AND BUCKLES, IRON OR STEEL, COT- 
TON BALING TIE, IN BAGS, BARRELS, BOXES OR WIRED BUNDLES, 
IN STRAIGHT OR MIXED CARLOADS, MINIMUM WEIGHT 30,000 
POUNDS. 

a. Cancel. Apply class rates. 

By order of thfe Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued July 14, 1932. Clerk. 

Supplement No. 2 to Circular No. 328 (Cancels Circular No. 328). 

Supplement No. 2 to Circular No. 332 

(Cancels Supplement No. 1) 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON MOLASSES AND SYRUP, viz. 

Amend Commodity Description to Read: 

Molasses, and Syrup (except coloring, flavoring, fruit or medicated 

syrups) ; 
Molasses, beet, cane or sorghum; 
Corn Syrup, mixed: 

In packages as provided in Southern Classification, straight or mixed 
carloads, minimum weight 36,000 pounds; in tank cars, minimum 
weight 50,000 pounds. 

Commodities shown in Supplement No. 1 and not brought forward are 
hereby cancelled. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

Issued December 15, 1931. Clerk. 

Effective January 15, 1932. 

Supplement No. 2 to Circular No. 332 (Cancels Supplement No. 1). 

GENERAL RULES GOVERNING NORTH CAROLINA 
INTRASTATE TRAFFIC 

Add to Circular No. 330 : 

Rule 6 — Alternative Application of Combination Bates 

If the charge based on the aggregate of intermediate local, joint or pro- 
portional rates approved or prescribed by this Commission, is lower than 



Freight Rates 137 

the charge accruing under the through rates approved or prescribed from 
origin to destination, such lower charge will be the legal charge to apply. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

Issued May 26, 1932. Clerk. 

Effective June 15, 1932. 

Supplement No. 1 to Circular No. 339. 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON PAPER, viz. 

a (2). GLAZED, for manufacture of paper boxes or for wrapping purposes, 
in boxes, bundles, crates or rolls, any quantity; 

a(l). PRINTING, in boxes, bundles, crates or rolls, less than carload; 

a. STRAWBOARD and PULPBOARD, in boxes, bundles, crates or rolls, 
less than carload; 

a. WRAPPING or LINING, in boxes, bundles, crates or rolls, less than 
carload ; 

(2). GLAZED, for manufacture of paper boxes or for wrapping purposes, 
in boxes, bundles, crates or rolls, C. L., minimum weight 36,000 lbs. 

a. Cancel. Apply class rates. 

(1). Reissued from Supplement No. 1, effective January 5, 1931. 

(2). Reissued from Supplement No. 2, effective January 10, 1931. 

By order of the Commission: • R. O. Self, 

Issued February 3, 1931. Clerk. 

Effective February 20, 1931. 

Supplement No. 3 to Circular No. 343 (Cancels Supplement No. 2). 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON BRICK AND ARTICLES TAKING SAME 
RATES, OR MADE WITH RELATION THERETO 

List of Articles in Uniform Brick List 

Item 1. 

Rates apply on the following articles in straight or mixed carloads (unless 
otherwise indicated), minimum weight 50,000 pounds, made of (except as 
otherwise indicated), clay, concrete, gypsum, plaster or shale: 

Blocks, viz.: 

(Will not apply on Artificial Stone Blocks, Pieces or Slabs, in imitation 

of Natural Stone). 
Building (solid, hollow or perforated), except enameled. 
Cinder-Cement building. 
Condensing (including condensing rings). 
Facing (solid, hollow or perforated), except enameled. 
Filter bed (solid, hollow or perforated), shale or fire clay. 
Furnace. 

Paving, shale or fire clay. 
Radial. 

Salt glazed, when shipped in same manner as building or facing blocks. 
Segment. 
Silo. 



138 'N. C, CoBPORATioN Commission 

Brick, viz.: 

Building (solid, hollow or perforated), except enameled. 
Common, as described in Item 2, when mixed with articles in this Item. 
(See Item 2 for basis for making rates on Brick, common, straight 
carloads.) 
Facing (solid, hollow or perforated), except enameled. 
Fire, including fire brick made of chrome, corundite, magnesite or silica. 
Furnace. 

Paving, shale or fire clay. 
Radial. 

Salt glazed, when shipped in same manner as building or facing brick. 
Sand. 

Sand cement. 
Sand lime. 
Slag. 
Zinc or lead glazed. 

Clay: 

Ground (fire). 

Fire clay, ground fire brick and water combined (unshaped plastic 
fire brick). 

Conduits, not lined. 

CurMng, Clay or shale, street (verified). 

Furnace or Kiln Lining, or high temperature bonding mortar or cement, 
in bags or barrels, in straight carloads or in mixed carloads with fire 
brick or clay. 

Shale, ground (fire). 

Slahs (including silo slabs), clay, concrete or shale, not enameled, not 
roofing or ornamental, loaded loose in cars, or packed in crates or 
barrels, not individually packed, when shipped in same manner as 
building or facing brick. 

*Tile: 
Fire-Proofing, 

Fire-Proofing or hollow building, broken, crushed or ground, 
Flat, unglazed, punched or not punched, 
Hollow building. 

*Rates named herein on commodities bearing this reference mark will not apply on heary 
load bearing Concrete Tile, as carried in Circular No. 271. 

Item 2. 

Basis for Bates on Common Brick 

On Brick, Common, not hollow, made from low-grade clay or shale, when 
not braced, wedged or packed for protection against rubbing, breaking 
or chipping, not including any grade (firsts, seconds, thirds, or culls), 
of enameled face, front, paving, fire or refractory brick, carload minimum 
weight marked capacity of car, (See Notes 1 and 2), rates will be 80 
per cent of the mileage scale shown herein. 

Note 1. — Where for its own convenience, a carrier furnishes a car that cannot be loaded 
to the marked capacity of car, such car must be loaded to full visible capacity and charges 
assessed on basis of actual weight, but not less than 50,000 pounds. 

Note 2. — "Where a carrier, for its own convenience provides a car of greater capacity than 
that ordered by shipper, charges shall be assessed on basis of minimum weight fixed for 
car of capacity ordered; provided the shipment could have been loaded into car of the 
capacity ordered ; and provided, further, that where a car of greater capacity is accepted by 
shipper and loaded beyond the loading capacity of car ordered, the minimum weight shall 
be that of a car stencilled capacity next above the actual weight of shipment. 

If, in any case, the rates on articles in the uniform brick list as 
described in Item 1, at actual weight subject to a carload minimum 
weight of 50,000 pounds, will result in a lower total charge, the latter 



Freight Bates 



139 



will apply in lieu of the common brick rates subject to a carload minimum 
weight based on marked capacity of car. 

Kate in Cents Per One Hundred Pounds 



Distances 



10 miles and under. . . 

20 miles and over 10 

30 miles and over 20 

40 miles and over 30. 

50 miles and over 40. 

60 miles and over 50. 

70 miles and over 60. 

80 miles and over 70. 

90 miles and over 80. 
100 miles and over 90. 
120 miles and over 100. 
140 miles and over 120- 
160 miles and over 140. 
180 miles and over 160. 
200 miles and over 180. 
220 miles and over 200. 
240 miles and over 220. 
260 miles and over 240. 
280 miles and over 260. 
300 miles and over 280. 
320 miles and over 300. 
340 miles and over 320. 
360 miles and over 340. 
380 miles and over 360. 
400 miles and over 380. 
425 miles and over 400. 
450 miles and over 425. 
475 miles and over 450. 
500 miles and over 475. 
525 miles and over 500. 
550 miles and over 525. 
575 miles and over 550. 
600 miles and over 575. 
625 miles and over 600, 
650 miles and over 625 
675 miles and over 650 



Scale "A' 



Single 
Line 



4 

43^ 

5 

53^ 

6 

6>^ 

7 

7M 



83^ 
9 

9>^ 
10 

11 

12 

12H 

13 

1334 

14 

U'A 

15 

15H 

16 

im 

17 

1734 

18 

18>4 

19 

193^ 

20 

203^^ 

21 



Joint 
Haul 



5 

53^^ 

6 

63^ 

7 

734 



83^ 
9 

934 

10 

lOH 
11 
113^ 

12 

123^ 

13 

133^ 

14 

143^ 

15 

15^ 

16 

163^ 

17 

173^ 

18 

18H 

19 

193^ 

20 

2034 

21 



Scale "B" 



Single 
Line 



6 

6H 
7 

73^ 
8 

9 

10 
10 
10>4 

11 
iiH 

12 

123^ 

13 

13H 

14 

14>4 

15 

15H 

16 

16>4 

17 

173^ 

18 

18^ 

19 

19^ 

20 

2034 

21 

21^ 
22 
223^ 
23 



Joint 
Haul 



7 

7H 

8 

83^ 

9 

93^ 
10 
10 
10 
10 

lOH 
11 
11^ 

12 

123^ 

13 

13H 

14 

UH 

15 

15H 

16 

16H 

17 

17H 

18 

18J4 

19 

im 

20 

203^ 

21 

21H 

22 

22>4 

23 



Scale "A" Rates applicable to common carriers in Groups A, B and C of 
Circular No. 290. 

Scale "5" Rates applicable to common carriers in Group D of Circular No. 
290. The arbitrary of two (2) cents per 100 pounds on carload shipments 
allowed in this scale over the rates in Scale "A" shall accrue solely to the 
carrier or carriers in Group D of Circular No. 290. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued April 24, 1931. Clerk. 

Effective May 10, 1931. 

Circular No. 346 (Cancels Circular No. 337). 



140 N. C. CoKPORATioN Commission 

Supplement No. 1 to Circular No, 346 

The effective date of Circular No. 346, containing 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON BRICK 

And Articles Taking Same Rates, or Made With Relation Thereto, is Hereby 
Postponed Until June 10, 1931. 

By order of the Commission; R. 0. Self, 

Issued May 1, 1931. Clerk. 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON LIVE STOCK 
(As described below) 

Descriptions 

1. Horses and Mules, Carload, Minimum Weight as shown on page 3. 

2. Cattle Single Deck; Hogs, Sheep, Calves, Goats, Lambs and Kids, Double 

Deck, Carload, Minimum Weight as shown on page 3. 

3. Calves and Hogs, Single Deck, Carload, Minimum Weight as shown on 

page 3. 

4. Sheep, Goats, Lambs and Kids, Single Deck, Carload, Minimum Weight 

a.s shown on page 3. 

Stocker Live Stock 

5. Cattle, Single Deck; Hogs, Sheep, Calves, Goats, Lambs and Kids, 

Double Deck, Carload, Minimum Weight as shown on page 3. 

6. Calves and Hogs, Single Deck, Carload, Minimum Weight as shown on 

page 3. 

7. Sheep, Goats, Lambs and Kids, Single Deck, Carload, Minimum Weight 

as show on page 3. 



Freight Rates 



141 



Miles 



1 through 

6 through 

11 through 

16 through 

21 through 

26 through 

31 through 

36 through 

41 through 

51 through 

61 through 

71 through 

81 through 

91 through 

101 through 

111 through 

121 through 

131 through 

141 through 

151 through 

161 through 

171 through 

181 through 

191 through 

201 through 

211 through 

22-1 through 

231 through 

241 through 

251 through 

276 through 

301 through 

326 through 

351 through 

376 through 

401 through 

426 through 

451 through 

481 through 

511 through 

541 through 

571 through 



5.. 
10- 
15.. 
20.. 
25.. 
30. 
35.. 
40.. 
50. 
60. 
70. 
80. 
90. 
100. 

no. 

120- 
13 
140 
150- 
160- 
170- 
180- 
190- 
200- 
210- 
220- 
230- 
240- 
250- 
275- 
300- 
325. 
350- 
375- 
400- 
425- 
450. 
480- 
510- 
540- 
570- 
600- 



S.L. 



Rates in Cents Per 100 Pounds 



Description Number (see Above) 



11 

i2y2 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20U 

22 

231/2 

2, 

26H 

28 

29 

,30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

35H 

363/2 

37 

38 

39 

39M 

40/2 

41 

42/ 

44 

45 

46 

47 

48 

49 

50 

51 

53/ 

54 

55 

56/ 



J.L. 



S.L. 



14 

15/ 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23/ 

25 

26/ 

28 

29/ 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 



39/ 

40 

40 

41 

41/ 

42/ 

43 

44/ 

46 

47 

48 

48 

49 

50 

51 

52 

53/ 

54 

55 

56/ 



7 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
25/ 
26 
27 
27/ 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33/ 
35 

36/ 
38 
39/ 
41 

42.1/^ 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 



J.L. 



10 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

28/ 

29 

30 

30 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35/ 

37 

38/ 

40 

40/ 

42 

43/ 

45 

46 

46 

47 

48 

49 



S.L. 



10/ 

IIH 

12/ 

14 

15 

16 

17/ 

I8/2 

19/ 

20/ 

22 

23 

24 

25/ 

26/ 

27/ 

29 

29/ 

30 

31 

31/ 

32 

33/ 

34/ 

35/ 

37 

38/ 

40/ 

42 

43/ 

45/ 

47 

49 

501 

52 

53 

54 

55 

56/ 



J.L. 



113^ 

11/ 

12/ 

14 

15 

16 

17/ 

18/ 

19/ 

20/ 

22 

23 

24 

25/ 

26/ 

27/ 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

33/ 

34/ 

34/ 

34/ 

35/ 

37 

38 

39 

41 

421^ 

44/ 

46 

46/ 

48/ 

50 

52 

53 

53 

54 

55 

56/ 



S.L. 



10 

113^ 

12/ 

14 

15 

16/ 

17/ 

19 

20 

21/ 

223/2 

24 

25 

26/ 

27/ 

29 

30 

31/ 

32 

32/ 

34 

34/ 

35 

363 

37/ 

39 

40 

42 

44 

45/ 

47/ 

49/ 

53 

55 

56/ 

57/ 

59 

60 

61/ 



J.L. 



12/ 
12/ 
14 
15 

16/ 
17/ 
19 

20 

213^ 

22x2 

24 

25 

25/ 

27/ 

29 

30 

31/ 

32 

34 

35 

35: 

363-^ 

373^^ 

37/ 

373/2 

39 

40 

41/ 

42/2 

44/ 

463^ 

48 

50 

50/ 

52/ 

54/ 

5632 

57/ 

573^ 

59 

69 

61/ 



S-L. 



J.L. 



5/ 

5/ 

6 

7 

7/ 

83'2 

9 
10 

10/ 

11/ 

12 

13 

13/ 

14/ 

15 

16 

WA 

nii 

18 
19 
19 

1932 

20/^ 

20/ 

21 

22 

22/ 

23/ 

24 

25 

26/ 

27/ 

2834 

29/ 

31 

32 

33 

34 

34/ 

35/ 35/ 

36 36 

37 37 



7/ 
7/ 
8/ 
9 

10 

10/ 

1134 

12 

13 

13/ 

14/ 

15 

16 

16/ 

17/ 

18 

19 

10,/ 

20/ 

21 

21/ 

22 

22/ 

22/ 

22/ 

2334 

24 

25 

25/ 

26/ 

28 

29 

30 

30/ 

31/ 

32/ 

34 

343^ 

34/ 



S.L. 



8/ 
9/ 

10/ 

11^ 

12 

13 

14 

1434 

153.4 

16/ 

17/ 

18 

19 

20 

20/ 

22 

22 

223. i; 

23/ 

23/ 

24 

25 

26 

26/ 

28 

29 

3031: 

31/ 

3234 

34 

35/ 

37 

38 

39 

40 

40/ 

41/ 

42/ 



J.L. 



8/ 
8/ 
■9/ 

103^ 

113^ 

12 

13 

14 

14/ 

15/ 

16/ 

1734 

18 

19 

20 

20-'2 

22 

22/ 

23/ 

24 

25 

25 

26 

26 

26 

26/ 

28 

28/ 

29/ 

31 

32 

33/ 

34/ 

35 

36/ 

37/ 

39 

40 

40 

403f 

41/ 

42/ 



S.L. 



7 

7 

7/ 

8/ 

9/ 

10/ 

113^ 

12/ 

13 

14/ 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

20/ 

22 

22/ 

23/ 

24 

24/ 

25/ 

26 

26/ 

27/ 

28 

29/ 

30 

31/ 

33 

34 

3534 

37 

38/ 

40 

41/ 

4234 

43 

44/ 

45 



J.L. 



103^ 

IIH 

123^^ 

13 

143^ 

15 

16 

►17 

18 

19 

20 

20/ 

22 

22/ 

23/ 

24/ 

25/ 

26/ 

26/ 

27/ 

28 

28 

28 

2914 

30 

31 

32 

33/ 

35 

36 

37/ 

38 

39^ 

41 

42/ 

43 

43 

44/ 

45 

46 



S. L. — Single Line. 



J. L. — Joint Line. 



The above scales of rates shall apply over lines of carriers listed in 
Groups A, B and C, of Circular No. 290. 



142 



^. C. Corporation Commission 



Rates for account of carriers shown in Group D of Circular No. 290 
shall be made by applying the following arbitraries to the above scales, 
such arbitraries to accrue solely to Group D carriers: 

HORSES and MULES, not to exceed 5 cents per 100 pounds. 
EDIBLE LIVESTOCK, not to exceed 4 cents per 100 pounds. 

MINIMUM WEIGHTS ON LIVESTOCK 

Horses and Mules 

An estimated weight of 1,000 pounds for each animal will be applicable, 
subject to the following carload minimum weights: 

36 feet 7 inches and under 23,000 pounds 

Over 36 feet 7 inches to and including 38 feet 6 inches 24,500 pounds 

Over 38 feet 6 inches to and including 40 feet 6 inches 25,760 pounds 

Over 40 feet 6 inches 26,910 pounds 

Minimum weights on beef and stock cattle, hogs and pigs, including stocker 
pigs, sheep, goats, lambs, kids, including stocker and calves, will be as 
follows : 



Length of Cars 
(Inside Measurement) 

(Fractions of an inch will not be 
counted in computing length 
of car.) 



36 feet 7 inches and less 

Over 36 feet 7 inches to and includ- 
ing 38 feet 

Over 38 feet to and including 

40 feet 

Over 40 feet to and including 

41 feet 

Over 41 feet to and including 

42 feet-- 

Over 42 feet to and including 

43 feet 

Over 43 feet to and including 

44 feet 

Over 44 feet I 



Pounds 



Cattle 
(Other 
than 
Stocker 
Cattle) 



20,000 
22,272 
22,272 
23,636 
23,636 
23,942 

24,500 

See 
Notel 



Stocker 
Cattle 



20,000 

21,500 

21,500 

22,038 

22,575 

23,113 

23,650 

See 
Note 2 



Calves, 
S. D. 



16,000 

17,000 

17,000 

18,000 

18,000 

18,000 

18,150 

See 
Notel 



Hogs, 
S. D. 



16,000 

17,882 

17,882 

18,328 

18,776 

19,222 

19,670 

See 
Notel 



Sheep, 
Goats, 
Lambs, 
and 
Kids, 
S. D. 



12,000 
14.000 
14,000 
14,350 
14,700 
15,050 

15,400 

See 
Notel 



Calves, 
D. D. 



22,000 

24,500 

24,500 

26,000 

26,000 

26,338 

26,950 

See 
Notel 



Hogs, 
D. D. 



22,000 
24,500 
24,500 
26,000 
26,000 
26,338 

26,950 

See 
Notel 



Sheep, 
Goats, 
Lambs, 
and 
Kids, 
D. D. 



18,000 

19,000 

19,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 
20,000 



Note 1. — Where reference is made to this note, the following will apply: 
For each foot or fraction of a foot in cKcess of 44 feet in length, add the following 
to the minimum weight provided for cars 44 feet long: 
On beef cattle, also on calves, hogs, sheep, lambs, kids and goats, in 

doub'e-deck cars 612% pounds 

On calves, in single-deck cars 412% pounds 

On hogs, in single-deck cars 475 pounds 

On sheep, lambs, kids and goats, in single-deck cars 350 pounds 

Note 2. — On stock cattle, the following will apply: 

In cars over 44 feet to and including 45 feet in length 24,188 pounds 

In cars over 45 feet to and including 46 feet in length 24,725 pounds 

In cars over 46 feet to and including 47 feet in length 25,263 pounds 



Freight Rates 



143 



In cars over 47 feet to and including 48 feet in length 25,800 pounds 

In cars over 48 feet to and including 49 feet in length 26,338 pounds 

In cars over 49 feet to and including 50 feet in length 26,875 pounds 

In cars over 50 feet long, add 538 pounds for each foot or fraction of a foot in excess 
of 50 feet to the minimum for 50-foot car. 
Note 3. — Cattle, in double-deck cars, will not be accepted. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Sei.f, 

Issued May 15, 1931. Clerk. 

Effective June 10, 1931. 
Circular No. 347 (Cancels Circular No. 264). 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON ROAD BUILDING MATERIALS, viz. 
Stone (crushed, broken or ground), stone screening, chert, gravel, sand, 
and/or slag, mixed or coated with asphalt, oil, tar, and /or lime; the weight 
of asphalt, oil, tar, and/or lime content to be more than 2 per cent, but 
not more than 9 per cent of the whole, and the percentage of the mixture 
to be specified on the bill of lading; carload, minimum weight 90 per cent 
of marked capacity of car, except where car is loaded to full visible capacity 
actual weight will be charged for. 





Rates are Shown in Cents Per Net Ton 


Distances 


Scale "A" 


Scale "B" 


10 miles and under . 


80 
85 
90 

too 

110 
120 
130 
140 
150 
160 
165 
170 
180 
190 
195 
205 
215 
225 
235 
245 


110 


20 miles and over 10 -. 


115 


30 miles and over 20 __. 


120 


40 miles and over 30 


130 


60 miles and over 40 


140 


80 miles and over 60 


150 


100 miles and over 80 . . 


160 


125 miles and over 100 


170 


150 miles and over 125 


180 


175 miles and over 150 . _ 


190 


200 miles and over 175-_ . _ 


195 


230 miles and over 200 


200 


260 miles and over 230 


210 


290 miles and over 260 


220 


320 miles and over 290 


225 


360 miles and over 320. 


235 


400 miles and over 360 


245 


440 miles and over 400 


255 


480 miles and over 440. 


265 


620 miles and over 480. 


275 







Scale "A" applicable for single and joint hauls over rails of carriers listed 
in Groups A, B and C of Circular No. 290, supplements thereto and reissues 
thereof. 

Scale "J5" applicable for single and joint hauls over rails of carriers listed 
in Group D of Circular No. 290, supplements thereto and reissues thereof. 
The arbitrary of 30 cents per net ton herein over Scale "A" rates shall 
accrue solely to the carrier or carriers in Group D of Circular No. 290. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

Issued May 22, 1931. Clerk. 

Effective June 10, 1931. 

Circular No. 348 (Cancels Circular No. 292). 



144 



N. C. CoRi<)RATioN Commission 



MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON LIMESTONE OR MARBLE (EXCEPT 
BITUMINOUS ROCK, ASPHALTIC LIMESTONE, BITUMINOUS ASPHALT 
ROCK, PHOSPHATE ROCK, OR GYPSUM), CRUSHED, GRANULATED, 
GROUND OR PULVERIZED TO FINENESS TO PASS THROUGH A 
SCREEN OF 5/16 INCH MESH, INCLUDING STONE DUST, IN BULK 
OR IN BAGS, IN CARLOADS, MINIMUM WEIGHT 60,000 POUNDS. 



Distances 


Rates are 


Shown in Cents Per Net Ton 


Scale "A" 


Scale "B" 


Scale "C" 




70 
80 
90 
100 
110 
120 
130 
140 
150 
165 
180 
190 
200 
210 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 
300 
310 
32 f) 
330 


90 
100 
110 
120 
130 
140 
150 
160 
170 
185 
200 
210 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 
340 
350 


95 
105 
115 
125 
135 
145 
155 
165 
175 
190 
205 
215 




30 n:iles and over 20 _.. . . 




50 miles and. over 40 


60 miles and over 50 


80 miles and over 60 . . 


100 miles and over 80 


120 miles and over 100 - . 


140 males and over 120 




200 miles and over 170 . _. 


230 miles and over 200 


225 
235 


260 mjiles and over 230 


290 miles and over 260 


245 


320 miles and over 290 


255 


350 miles and over 320 

380 miles and over 350 


265 
275 


410 miles and over 380 _-. . 


285 




295 




305 


500 miles and over 470 


315 


540 miles and over 500 


325 


580 mules and over 540 

620 miles and over 580 


335 
345 


660 miles and over 620 


355 







Scale A. The rates in this scale are applicable for single and joint line 
hauls over railroads listed in Groups "A" and "B" of Circular No. 349, 
Supplements thereto and reissues thereof. 

Scale B. The rates in this scale are applicable between points on the 
Norfolk Southern Railroad and between points on the Norfolk Southern 
Railroad on the one hand and lines listed in Groups "A" and "B" of Circular 
No, 349, on the other hand. 

Scale C. The rates in this scale are applicable between points on lines 
of carriers listed in Group "D" of Circular No. 349, also between carriers 
in Group "D" on the one hand and carriers listed in Groups "A," "B" and 
"C" on the other hand (see note). 



Note. — The arbitrary of 20 cents allowed in Scale B over Scale A rates shall accrue 
solely to the Norfolk Southern Railway. The arbitrary of. 25 cents allowed in Scale 
over Scale A rates shall accrue solely to G-oup D carriers of Circular No. 349, except 
where the Norfolk Southern is also a participating carrier the following shall be used in 
dividing the arbitrary: 



Freight Rates 



145 



Deduct 5 cents from arbitrary of 25 cents and allow solely to Group D 
carriers; divide remaining 20 cents between Norfolk Southern Railroad and 
Group D carriers. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued November 5, 1931. Clerk. 

Effective December 10, 1931. 

Circular No. 350 (Cancels Circular No. 291 to the extent shown in Sup- 
plement No. 1 thereto). 

Supplement No. 1 to Circular No. 350 

Amend Description in Circular No. 350 to read: 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON LIMESTONE* OR MARBLE (EXCEPT 
BITUMINOUS ROCK, ASPHALTIC LIMESTONE, BITUMINOUS AS- 
PHALT ROCK, PHOSPHATE ROCK, OR GYPSUM), CRUSHED, 
GRANULATED, GROUND OR PULVERIZED TO FINENESS TO PASS 
THROUGH A SCREEN OF 5/16 INCH MESH, INCLUDING STONE DUST. 

In bulk or in bags, in carloads. Minimum weight 60,000 pounds. 
By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued June 27. 1932. Clerk. 



MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON PETROLEUM AND PETROLEUM PROD- 
UCTS, INCLUDING COMPOUNDED OILS OR GREASES HAVING A 
PETROLEUM BASE, AND BLENDED GASOLINES (See Notes 1, 2, and 
3, page 2) VIZ: 



Item 1: 

Absorption oil, 
Belt oil, 
Benzine, 
Blended gasolines, 

(See Note 3) 
Compression oil, 
Cordage oil. 
Crude oil, (See Note 4) 
Floor oil. 

Fuel oil, (See note 4) 
Gas oil, (See Note 4) 



Gasoline, casing head, 

Gasoline, N, 0. I. B. N. 
in Southern Classifi- 
cation, 

Miners' oil stock. 

Harness oil, 

Leather oil. 

Miners' oil, 

Naphtha, 

Naphtha distillate, 

Neatsfoot oil. 



Putty oil, 

Refined oil distillate, 

Refined oil, illuminat- 
ing, or burning. 

Soap oil, 

Tanners' oil, 

Tobacco oil, 

Transformer oil. 

Wool oil, or 

Oil, N. 0. I. B. N. in 
Southern Classifica- 
tion. 



In glass or earthenware, packed in barrels or boxes; in metal cans, par- 
tially or completely jacketed; in metal cans in boxes or in bulk in barrels; 
carload, minimum weight 26,000 pounds, subject to Rule 34 of Southern 
Classification. In tank cars, carload, estimated weight per gallon 6.6 pounds, 
subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Benzol (benzine) in metal cans in boxes or in bulk in barrels, carload, 
minimum weight 30,000 pounds. In tank cars, carload, subject to Rule 35 
of Southern Classification. 

Benzol-mixed-with-gasoline (mixture of benzol and gasoline) in iron or 
steel drums and iron or steel barrels, minimum carload weight 30,000 pounds. 
In tank cars, carload, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 



*Not applicable on ground or pulverized limestone in open top cars. 
No. 356.) 



( See Circular 



10 



146 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Gas liquefied petroleum, having a vapor pressure exceeding 40 pounds per 
square inch, absolute (Reid method), at 100 degrees F., March to October, 
inclusive, or exceeding 45 pounds per square inch, absolute (Reid method), 
at 100 degrees F., November to February, inclusive, carloads, in tank cars of 
the type prescribed by the Interstate Commerce Commission (see B. W 
Dunn Tariff 2, I. C. C. 2), subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification, and 
an estimated weight of 6.6 pounds per gallon. 

Gas liquefied petroleum, having a vapor pressure exceeding 40 pounds per 
square inch, absolute (Reid method) at 100 degrees F., March to October,, 
inclusive, or exceeding 45 pounds per square inch, absolute (Reid method) 
at 100 degrees F., November to February, inclusive, in steel cylinders com- 
plying with the Interstate Commerce Commission's shipping container speci> 
fications (see B. W. Dunn Tariff 2, I. C. C. 2), carloads, minimum weight 
60,000 pounds. 

Gas, liquefied petroleum, with gas pressure not over 23 pounds per square 
inch at 70 degrees F., nor over 70 pounds per square inch at 130 degrees F., 
in steel drums of the type prescribed by the Interstate Commerce Commission 
(see B. W. Dunn Tariff 2, I. C. C. 2), carloads, minimum weight 60,000 pounds. 

Grease, axle; Grease, N. 0. I. B. N., in Southern Classification: In metal 
cans in crates; in wooden pails or tubs; in kits or iron or steel pails or in 
barrels or boxes; carload, minimum weight 30,000 pounds. In tank cars, 
carload, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Grease, lubricating, other than axle grease: In metal tubes in barrels or 
boxes; in metal cans in crates; in wooden pails or tubs; in kits or iron or 
steel pails or in barrels or boxes; carload, minimum weight 30,000 pounds. In 
tank cars, carload, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Grease, petroleum lubricating, combined with wool waste, in straight car- 
loads or in mixed carloads with grease petroleum lubricating, minimum 
weight 30,000 lbs. 

Lubricating oil, in glass or earthenware, packed in barrels or boxes, in 
metal cans, partially or completely jacketed; in metal cans in crates or 
boxes or in bulk in barrels; carload, minimum weight 26,000 pounds, subject 
to Rule 34 of Southern Classification. In tank cars, carload, estimated weight 
per gallon 6.6 pounds, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Paraffine wax, in bags, barrels or boxes or in bulk; carload, minimum 
weight 30,000 pounds. In tank cars, carload, subject to Rule 35 of Southern 
Classification. 

Petrolatum or petrolatum preparations, including cosmoline, densoline^ 
litholine, petroleum jelly, petrolina or vaseline (see Note 2 below): In glass 
or earthenware, packed in barrels or boxes; in metal tubes in barrels or 
boxes; in metal cans in barrels, boxes or crates; in wooden pails or tubs; in 
kits or iron or steel pails or in bulk in barrels; carload, minimum weight 
30,000 pounds. In tank cars, carload, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classi- 
fication. 

Petroleum or petroleum products, including compounded oils or greases 
having a petroleum base (see Notes 1 and 2 below) shipped in storage tanks: 
When the contents of storage tank equal or exceed one-third (1-3) of tank's 
capacity in gallons, the rating provided for oil of the same kind in barrels 
shall apply, actual weight of the oil and tank to be charged for, carload, 
minimum weight 30,000 pounds, subject to Rule 34 of Southern Classifica- 
tion. When the contents do not equal one-third (1-3) of tank's capacity, the 
shipment will be treated as a combination article (see Rule 18 of Southern 
Classification.) 

Wax, N. O. I. B. N., in Southern Classification, in bags, barrels or boxes; 
carload, minimum weight 30,000 pounds: In tank cars, carload, subject to 
Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Wax tailings, in barrels, carload minimum weight 30,000 pounds: In tank 
cars, carload, subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 



Freight Rates 



147 



NOTB 1. — ^The term "having' a petroleum base," as used in this item, means the prin- 
cipal ingredient of such compound oils or greases must be petroleum. 

Note 2. — Petroleum oil, N. O. I. B. N. in Southern Classification, petrolatum or petro- 
latum preparations, prepared and represented as a remedy, medicine or lubricant for the 
human body, will be rated under the specification for medicine, N. O. I. B. N. in Southern 
Classification. 

Note 3. — The term "blended gasolines" as used in this item covers motor fuels con- 
taining fifty per cent or more of gasoline. 

Note 4. — Applies only in mixed carloads with one or more articles named in this item. 
For rates on crude, fuel and gas oils, see Item 2. 

Item 2. 

Rates on Crude petroleum oil, fuel oil (petroleum) and gas oil (petroleum), 
in bulk in barrels, straight or mixed carloads, minimum weight 40,000 pounds, 
or in tank cars, carload, estimated weight per gallon 7.4 pounds, subject to 
Rule 35 of Southern Classification, shall be 80 per cent of the rates shown 
in Item 1. Fractions of three-fourths of a cent, or over, shall be computed 
as one cent and fractions less than three-fourths, but not less than one-fourth 
of a cent, shall be computed as half cent. Fractions of less than one-fourth 
of a cent shall be dropped. 



RATES ON 



PETROLEUM AND PETROLEUM 
DESCRIBED IN ITEM 1 



PRODUCTS, C. L., AS 



Rates are in Cents Per Hundred Pounds 



Scale "A' 



Miles 


Rate 


Miles 


Rate 


1 through 5 — - . 


10 
11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
18 
19 
20 
20 
21 
22 
22 
23 
24 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
28 
29 
30 
31 
31 


181 through 190 


32 


6 through 10 


191 through 200 


33 


11 through 15 - „ 


201 through 210 


33 


16 through 20.. ... 


211 through 220 


34 


21 through 25 - 


221 through 230 


34 


26 through 30 


231 through 240 


35 


31 through 35 .. 


241 through 260 


36 


36 through 40 


261 through 280 


37 


41 through 45 


281 through 300 .... 


38 


46 through 50 


301 through 320 


39 


51 through 55 


321 through 340 


40 


56 through 60 


341 through 360 .-. 


41 


61 through 65 


361 through 380 


42 


66 through 70. 


381 through 400 


42 


71 through 75 


401 through 420 


43 


76 through 80 


421 through 440 


44 


81 through 85 .. .. 


441 through 460 


44 


86 through 90 


461 through 480 


45 


91 through 95 . 


481 through 500 


46 


96 through 100 


501 through 520 


47 


101 through 110 


521 through 540 


47 


111 through 120 


541 through 569 


48 


121 through 130 


561 through 580 


49 


131 through 140 .- 


581 through 600 . 


50 


141 through 150 


601 through 620 


51 


151 through 160 


621 through 640 ... 


52 


161 through 170 


641 through 660 


53 


171 through 180. ... 


661 throuo-h 680 


54 









148 'N. C. Corporation Commission 

Scale "J5." Rates over routes made up in whole or in part of the lines of 
the Norfolk Southern Railroad (See Group C of Circular No. 352), 
an arbitrary equal to 20 per cent of the rates in Scale "A" may be added for 
that portion of the haul over the Norfolk Southern Railroad, subject to a 
maximum arbitrary of 6 cents per 100 pounds, which arbitrary shall accrue 
solely to the Norfolk Southern. 

Scale "C7." Rates over short or weak lines listed in Group D of Circular 
No. 352 shall be made by adding an arbitrary of six (6) cents per 100 pounds 
to the rates in Scale "A," which arbitrary shall accrue solely to said short 
or weak lines. 

Carriers may, in the publication of these rates, adopt the same system 
of grouping points as used in the publication of interstate rates on petroleum 
and petroleum products. 

By Order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued April 7, 1932. Clerk. 

Effective May 1, 1932. 

Circular No. 351 (Cancels Circular No. 333.) 

LIST OF AND GROUP DESIGNATION OF COMMON CARRIERS IN 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Group Designation of Common Carriers 

For convenience of the Commission in referring to the common carriers 
of the State, they are hereby grouped as follows: 

Group "A" 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Companj?-. 

Cape Fear Railways, Incorporated. 

Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway Company. 

Durham and Southern Railway Company. 

Moore Central Railway Company. 

Norfolk and Western Railway Company (except Abingdon Branch). 

Piedmont and Northern Railway Company. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company, 

(L. R. Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, Receivers). 
Southern Railway Company. 
Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company. 

Group "B" 

Asheville and Craggy Mountain Railway. 

Asheville Southern Railway Company. 

Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Company. 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company. 

Carolina and Tennessee Southern Railway Company. 

High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and Southern Railroad Company. 

State University Railroad Company. 

Yadkin Railroad Company. 

Group "C" 
Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. 

Group "D" 

Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad Company. 
Appalachian Railway Company. 
Atlantic and Carolina Railroad Company. 
Atlantic and Western Railroad Company. 
Black Mountain Railway Company. 
Bonlee and Western Railway Company. 
Carolina and Northeastern Railroad Company. 



Ereight Rates 149 

Carolina Southern Railway Company 

Cliffside Railroad Compaiiy. 

Danville and Western Railway Company. 

East Carolina Railway. 

East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad Company. 

Graham County Railroad Company. 

High Point, Thomasville and Denton Railroad Company. 

Laurinburg and Southern Railroad Company. 

Lawndale Railway and Industrial Company. 

Linville River Railroad Company. 

Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company. 

Maxton, Alma, and Southbound Railroad Company. 

Norfolk and Western Railway Company (Abingdon Branch). 

Raleigh and Charleston Railroad Company. 

Rockingham Railroad Company. 

Tallulah Falls Railway Company. 

Tennessee and North Carolina Railway Company. 

Townsville Railroad Company, The 

Tuckaseigee and Southeastern Railway Company. 

Virginia and Carolina Southern Railroad Company. 

Warrenton Railroad Company. 

Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern Railroad Company. 

Item 1.— On joint traffic between stations on the Southern Railway and sta- 
tions on the lines in Group "B," apply Southern Railway single line nites; 
Provided, the provisions of this item will not apply to traffic moving be- 
tween Greensboro and Rural Hall, N. C, on the one hand, and stations on 
the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway, on the other hand. 

Item 2. — On joint traffic between stations on the lines of Group "B" carriers 
and stations on the lines of Group "A," "C," and "D" carriers, when the 
Southern Railway is a party to the movement, the mileage of Group "B" 
carriers must be treated as a part of the Southern Railway mileage. 

By Order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued April 7, 1982. • . - Clerk. 

Effective May 1, 1932. • 

Circular No. 352 (Cancels Circular No. 349). 



150 



N. C. CoBPORATioN Commission 



MAXIMUM CLASS RATES 

Classes 123456789 10 11 12 

Percentage Relationship 100 85 70 55 45 40 35 30 25 22 V^ 20 17% 

Applicable to Common Carriers in Groups A and B of Circular No. 352, 
supplements thereto and successive issues thereof 



Rates in Cents 



Distances 



5 m 

10 m 

15 m 

20 m 

25 m 

30 m 

35 m 

40 m 

45 m 

50 m 

55 m 

60 m 

65 m 

70 m 

75 m 

80 m 

85 m 

90 m 

95 m 

100 m 

110 m 

120 m 

130 m 

140 m 

150 m 

160 m 

170 m 

180 m 

190 m 

200 m 

210 m 

220 m 

230 m 

240 m 

260 m 

280 m 

300 m 

320 m 

340 m 

360 m 

380 m 

400 m 

420 m 

440 m 



and under 

and over 5 

and over 10 

and over 15 

and over 20 

and over 25 

and over 30 

and over 35 

and over 40 

and over 45 

and over 50 

and over 55 

and over 60 

and over 65 

and over 70 

and over 75 

and over 80.- 

and over 85 

and over 90 ._ 

and over 95 

and over 100 

and over 110 

and over 120 

and over 130 

and over 140 

and over 150 

and over 160 

and over 170.. 

and over 180 

and over 190 

and over 200 

and over 210 

and over 220 

and over 230 

and over 240 

and over 260 

and over 280 

and over 300 

and over 320 

and over 340 

and over 360 

and over 380 

and over 400 

and over 420 -. 



94 



100 
102 
104 
106 
108 
110 
114 
118 
122 
126 
130 
134 
138 
142 
145 
148 



62 
63 
65 
67 

70 
72 
75 
77 
80 
82 
83 
85 
87 
88 
90 
92 
94 
97 
100 
104 
107 
111 
114 
117 
121 
123 
126 



23 
25 
27 
29 
30 
32 
34 
36 
37 
39 
41 
43 
44 
46 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
55 
57 
59 
62 
64 
66 
67 
69 
70 
71 
73 
74 
76 
77 
80 
83 
85 
88 
91 
94 
97 
99 
102 
104 



36 32 



Freight Rates 



151 



Rates in Cents 





Classes 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 

38 
39 
39 
40 
41 
42 
42 
43 
44 
45 
45 
46 
47 


10 

34 
35 
35 
36 
37 
37 
38 
39 
39 
40 
41 
41 
42 


11 

30 
31 
31 
32 
33 
33 
34 
34 
35 
36 
36 
37 
37 


12 


460 miles and over 440 


151 
154 
157 
160 
163 
166 
169 
172 
175 
178 
181 
184 
187 


128 
131 
133 
136 
139 
141 
144 
146 
149 
151 
154 
156 
159 


106 
108 
110 
112 
114 
116 
118 
120 
123 
125 
127 
129 
131 


83 
85 
86 
88 
90 
91 
93 
95 
96 
98 
100 
101 
103 


68 
69 
71 
72 
73 
75 
76 
77 
79 
83 
81 
83 
84 


60 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
74 
75 


53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 


45 

48 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
53 
54 
55 
56 


?6 


480 miles and over 460- . . _ . 


?7 


600 miles and over 480 .... 


?1 


520 miles and over 500 


9,9. 


540 miles and over 520. ..... 


?9 


560 miles and over 540. . ... 


W 


680 miles and over 560 


30 


600 miles and over 580 


30 


620 miles and over 600 


31 




81 


660 miles and over 640 


3*^ 


680 miles and over 660 


33 


700 miles and over 680 


33 







Rates for account of the Norfolk Southern Railroad (see Group C of Cir- 
cular 352) shall be determined by adding the following arbitraries to rates 
published above for that part of the haul over the Norfolk Southern Railroad : 



Distances 


First 

Class 

Arbitrary 


Distances 


First 

Class 

Arbitrary 


10 miles and under 


6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
12 
13 
14 


199 miles and over 160 


15 


25 miles and over 10.. 


220 miles and over 190 


16 


40 miles and over 25 


250 miles and over 220 


17 


50 miles and over 40 


293 miles and over 250 


18 


65 miles and over 50 


330 miles and over 290 


20 


80 miles and over 65 




21 


100 miles and over 80 




22 


120 miles and over 100 . . 


450 miles and over 410 


23 


140 miles and over 120 .... 


500 miles and over 450 


24 


160 miles and over 140... 


Over 500 miles 


25 









Rates for account of the carriers shown in Group D of Circular No. 352 
shall be determined by the distance rates shown above for account of carriers 
shown in Groups "A" and "B" of Circular No. 352, plus arbitraries similar 
to, but not necessarily the same as, those prescribed for account of the Nor- 
folk Southern Railroad (Group "C" of Circular No. 352). 

Carriers may, in the publication of these rates, adopt the same system of 
grouping points as used in the publication of interstate rates carried in Agent 
Cottrell's I. C. C. 752, supplements to and successive issues of the same. 

By Order of the Commission: R. O. Self. 

Issued May 26, 1932. Clerk, 

Circular No. 353. 



152 J^. C. COKPOBATION COxMMISSION 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON— 
Fruit, fresh: 

Peaches or plums, fresh, when packed in standard six basket crates, in 
standard bushel baskets, in half-bushel baskets, in bushel bituminous com- 
position fibreboard boxes, half-bushel bituminous composition fibreboard boxes, 
in peck baskets, or in peach box (California Box), straight or mixed carloads 
(see Notes 1, 2 and 3). 

Note 1, Specification of standard containers. 

For specification of standard containers, See Agent E. H.. Dulaney's I.C.C. 
No. 43, supplements thereto or successive issues thereof. 

Note 2. Cost of Refrigeration. 

Rates provided herein do not include refrigeration. For refrigeration rates, 
see Agent R. C. Dearborn's I.C.C. No. 4, Perishable Protective Tariff 5, supple- 
ments thereto or successive issues thereof. 

Note 3. Carload minimum weights and basis for assessing freight charges 
when cars are loaded in excess of carload minimum. 

When Packed in Standard Six-Basket Crates, in Straight Carloads 

When cars contain 448 crates, or less, carload minimum 22,850 pounds; when 
cars contain in excess of 448 crates, freight charges will be assessed on weight 
computed on basis of 51 pounds per standard six-basket crate. 

Exception: When for carriers' convenience cars with inside length of less 
than 32 feet are furnished, and such cars contain 392 crates, or less, carload 
minimum weight 20,000 pounds; when such cars contain in excess of 392 
crates, freight charges will be assessed on weight computed on basis of 51 
pounds per standard six-basket crate. 

When Packed in Standard Bushel Baskets, in Straight Carloads 

When cars contain 387 bushel baskets, or less, carload minimum 21,280 
pounds; when cars contain in excess of 387 bushel baskets, freight cha,rges 
will be assessed on weight computed on basis of 55 pounds per standard bushel 
basket. 

Exception: When for carriers' convenience cars with inside length of less 
than 32 feet are furnished, and such cars contain 351 bushel baskets, or less, 
carload minimum weight 19,300 pounds, when such cars contain in excess 
of 351 bushel baskets, freight charges will be assessed on weight computed 
on basis of 55 pounds per standard bushel basket. 

When Packed in Half-Bushei. Baskets, in Straight Carloads 

When cars contain 774 half-bushel baskets, or less, carload minimum 21,670 
pounds; when cars contain in excess of 774 half-bushel baskets, freight charges 
will be assessed on weight computed on basis of 28 pounds per half-bushel 
basket. 

Excei'tion: When for carriers' convenience cars with inside length of less 
than 32 feet are furnished, and such cars contain 702 half-bushel baskets or 
less, carload minimum 19,660 pounds; when such cars contain in excess of 
702 half-bushel baskets, freight charges will be assessed on weight computed 
on basis of 55 pounds per standard bushel basket. 

When Packed in Bushel Bituminous Composition Fibeeboaed Boxes, in 

Straight Carloads 

When cars contain 387 bushel bituminous composition fibreboard boxes, or 
less, carload minimum 21,280 pounds; when such cars contain in excess of 
387 bushel bituminous composition fibreboard boxes, freight charges will be 
assessed on weight computed on basis of 55 pounds per bushel bituminous 
composition fibreboard box. 

Exception: When for carriers' convenience cars with inside length less 
than 32 feet are furnished, and such cars contain 351 bushel bituminous com- 



f HEIGHT Rates 153 

position fibreboard boxes, or less, carload minimum weight 19,300 pounds; 
when such cars contain in excess of 351 bushel bituminous composition fibre- 
board boxes, freight charges will be assessed on weight computed on basis 
of 55 pounds per bushel bituminous composition fibreboard box. 

When Packed in Half-Bushel Bituminous Composition Fibreboard Boxes, 

IN Straight Carloads 

When cars contain 774 half-bushel bituminous composition fibreboard boxes, 
or less, carload minimum 21,670 pounds; when cars contain in excess of 774 
half-bushel bituminous composition fibreboard boxes, freight charges will be 
assessed on weight computed on basis of 28 pounds per half-bushel bituminous 
composition fibreboard box. 

Exception: When for carriers' convenience cars with inside length of less 
than 32 feet are furnished, and such cars contain 702 half-bushel bituminous 
composition fibreboard boxes, or less, carload minimum 19,660 pounds; when 
such cars contain in excess of 702 half-bushel bituminous composition fibre- 
board boxes, freight charges will be assessed on weight computed on basis of 
28 pounds per half-bushel bituminous composition fibreboard box. 

When Packed in Peck Baskets, in Straight Carloads 

When cars contain 1,548 peck baskets, or less, carload minimum 21,670 
pounds; when cars contain in excess of 1,548 peck baskets, freight charges 
will be assessed on weight computed on basis of 14 pounds per peck basket. 

Exception: When for carriers' convenience cars with inside length of less 
than 32 feet are furnished, and such cars contain 1,404 peck baskets, or less. 
carload minimum 19,660 pounds; when such cars contain in excess of 1,404 
peck baskets, freight charges will be assessed on weight computed on basis 
of 14 pounds per peck basket. 

When Packed in Peach Box (California Box), in Straight Carloads 

Cars containing 800 boxes or less shall be billed at 24,000 pounds; when 
cars contain in excess of 800 boxes, freight charges will be assessed on basis 
of 30 pounds per box for the entire car. 

When Packed in Standard Six-Basket Crates, Standard Bushel Baskets, 

Half-Bushel Baskets, Bushel Bituminous Composition Fibreboard 

Boxes, Half Bushel Bituminous Composition Fibreboard 

Boxes, and/or Peck Baskets, in Mixed Carloads 

Freight charges on cars containing a mixture of shipments packed in 
standard six-basket crates and/or standard bushel baskets and/or half-bushel 
baskets and/or bushel bituminous composition fibreboard boxes and/or half- 
bushel bituminous composition fibreboard boxes and/or peck baskets will be 
assessed on weight computed as follows: 

51 pounds per standard six-basket crate, 

55 pounds per standard bushel basket, 

28 pounds per half-bushel basket, 

55 pounds per bushel bituminous composition fibreboard box, 

28 pounds per half-bushel bituminous composition fibreboard box, 

14 pounds per peck basket, 

subject to a carload minimum weight of 22,850 pounds, except when, for car- 
riers' convenience, cars with inside length of less than 32 feet are furnished, 
such cars will be subject to carload minimum weight of 20,000 pounds. 

When Packed in Peach Box (California Box), in Mixed Carloads 

When shipped in mixed carloads with the various containers authorized, 
the minimum weight will be 24,000 pounds, except when for carriers' con- 
venience cars with inside length of less than 32 feet are furnished, such cars 
will be subject to a carload minimum weight of 20,000 pounds, when con- 
taining 666 boxes or less. 



154 



I^. C. CoKPORATioN Commission 



Rates In Cents Per 100 Pounds 



Miles 


Scale 
"A" 


Scale 
•*B" 


Miles 


Scale 
"A" 


Scale 
"B" 




16 
17 
18 
19 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
34 
35 
36 
37 
39 
40 
41 
43 
44 
45 
46 


23 
24 
25 
26 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
41 
42 
43 
44 
46 
47 
48 
50 
51 
52 
53 


190 and over 180 


47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
54 
55 
57 
59 
61 
63 
65 
67 
68 
70 
71 
72 
74 
75 
77 
78 
79 
81 
82 
84 
85 
86 


54 


10 and over 5 


200 and over 190 


55 


15 and over 10. 


210 and over 200 


56 


20 and over 15 


220 and over 210 


57 


25 and over 20 


230 and over 220 


58 


30 and over 25 


240 and over 230 . .. 


59 


35 and over 30 . 


260 and over 240 . 


61 


40 and over 35 


280 and over 260 


62 


45 and over 40. 


300 and over 280. 


64 


50 and over 45 


320 and over 300 


66 


55 and over 50 


340 and over 320 


68 


60 and over 55 


360 and over 340 


70 


65 and over 60 . 


380 and over 360 


72 


70 and over 65 


400 and over 380 


74 


75 and over 70 . . 


420 and over 400 


75 


80 and over 75 


440 and over 420 


77 


85 and over 80 


460 and over 440 


78 


90 and over 85 


480 and over 469. 


79 


95 and over 90 


500 and over 480 


81 


100 and over 95. 


520 and over 500 


82 


110 and over 100 


540 and over 520 _ . .. 


84 


120 and over 110 


560 and over 540 


85 


130 and over 120 


580 and over 560 


86 


140 and over 130 


600 and over 580 - 


88 


150 and over 140 .. . 


620 and over 600 


89 


160 and over 150 


640 and over 620 


91 


170 and over 160 


660 and over 640 


92 


180 and over 170 


680 and over 660 


93 









Scale "A" 

Applicable for single and joint hauls over rails of carriers listed in Groups 
A^ B and C of Circular No. 352, supplements thereto and reissues thereof. 

Scale "B" 

Applicable for single and joint hauls over rails of carriers listed in Group 
D of Circular No. 352, supplements thereto and reissues thereof. The arbitrary 
of seven (7) cents allowed in this scale over the rates in Scale "A" shall accrue 
solely to the carrier or carriers in Group D of Circular No. 352. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

Issued May 15, 1932. Clerk. 

Effective May 23, 1932. 

Circular No. 354 (Cancels Circular No. 323). 



MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON— 

Description A. Iron or steel, scrap or pieces, not copper clad (see Note 1) 
borings, filings or turnings, not granulated, ground nor powdered in 
straight or mixed carloads (not subject to Rule 24 of Southern Classifica- 
tion) carload minimum weight 50,000 pounds. (See Note 2.) 



Freight Rates 



155 



Description B. Iron or steel, scrap or pieces, not copper clad (see Note 1) 
borings, filings or turnings, not granulated, ground nor powdered in straight 
or mixed carloads (not subject to Rule 24 of Southern Classification) car- 
load minimum weight 80,000 pounds. (See Note 2.) 

Note 1. Rates apply only on scraps or pieces of iron or steel having value 
for remelting purposes only. 

Note 2. When the carload charge based on the higher rate at actual weight 
(but not less than the minimum weight specified for the higher rate) as 
shown under Description A, exceeds the charge based on the lower rate at 
actual weight (but not less than the minimum weight specified for the 
lower rate) as shown under Description B, the latter charge will apply. 

RATES IN CENTS PER TON OF 2,000 POUNDS 

For single and joint application over Common Carriers listed in Groups A 
and B of Circular No. 352, supplements thereto and successive issues thereof. 



Miles 



Description 


A 


B 


70 


55 


80 


65 


90 


70 


100 


80 


IJO 


90 


120 


95 


130 


105 


140 


110 


150 


120 


160 


130 


170 


135 


180 


145 


190 


150 


205 


165 


220 


175 


235 


190 


250 


200 


265 


210 


280 


225 


295 


235 


310 


250 



Miles 




Description 



1 through 5. 
6 through 10. 

11 through 15. 

16 through 20 

21 through 25. 

26 through 30 

31 through 40. 

41 through 50. 

51 through 60. 

61 through 70. 

71 through 80. 

81 through 90. 

91 through 100. 
101 through 120. 
121 through 140 
141 through 160. 
161 through 180. 
181 through 200. 
201 through 220. 
221 through 240. 
241 through 260, 



261 through 280 
281 through 300 
301 through 320 
321 through 340 
341 through 360 
361 through 380 
381 through 400 
401 through 420 
421 through 440 
441 through 460 
461 through 480 
481 through 500 
501 through 520 
521 through 540 
541 through 560 
561 through 580 
581 through 600 
601 through 620 
621 through 640 
641 through 660. 
661 through 680 



325 
340 
355 
370 
385 
400 
415 
430 
445 
460 
475 
490 
505 
520 
535 
550 
565 
580 
595 
610 
625 



270 
285 
295 
310 
320 
330 
345 
355 
370 
380 
390 
405 
415 
430 
440 
450 
465 
475 
490 
500 



Rates for account of the Norfolk Southern Railroad (See Group C of Cir- 
cular No. 352, supplements thereto or reissues thereof) shall be determined 
by adding the following arbitraries to rates published on Page 1 : 

Description A 
Add 20 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds. 

Description B 
Add 15 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds. 
Rates for account of carriers shown in Group D of Circular No. 352, supple- 
ments thereto or reissues thereof, shall be determined by the distance rates 
shown on Page No. 1 for account of carriers listed in Groups A and B of Cir- 
cular No. 352, plus the following arbitraries: 



156 



IST. C. CoRPORATioisr Commission 



Description A 
Add 25 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds. 

Description B 

Add 20 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds. 

Carriers may, in the publication of these rates, adopt the same system of 
grouping points as used in the publication of interstate rates carried in Agent 
F. L. Speiden's Freight Tariff No. 243, I.C.C. 1602, supplements to and suc- 
cessive issues of the same. 



By order of the Commission. 

Issued June 27, 1932. 

Effective July 14, 1932. 

Circular No. 355 (Cancels Circular No. 294). 



R. O. Self, 
Clerk. 



MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON— 

Marble, Granite and Stone (Crushed or Rubble), Stone Screenings, Gravel 
(Washed), Slag, Chert, Cinders, and Sand, in Straight or mixed carloads, 
carload minimum weight 90 per cent of marked capacity of car, except when 
cars are loaded to their visible capacity the actual weight will govern. 

Limestone, ground or pulverized, moving in open top equipment, C.L., 
minimum 90 per cent of marked capacity of car, except when cars are loaded 
to their visible capacity the actual weight will govern. (For rates in other 
than open top equipment, see Circular No. 350, supplements thereto and re- 
issues thereof.) 

Pee Ton of 2,000 Pounds 

Applicable to Common Carriers in Groups A, B and C of Circular No. 352, 
Supplements thereto and successive issues thereof; also Louisville & Nashville 
Railroad and Abingdon Branch of the Norfolk & Western Railway. 



Distances 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


Distances 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


10 miles and under 


50 
55 
60 
70 
80 
90 
100 
110 
120 
130 
135 


65 
70 
75 
85 
95 
105 
115 
125 
135 
140 
145 


230 miles and over 200 


140 
150 
160 
165 
175 
185 
195 
205 
215 
225 
235 


150 


20 miles and over 10 


260 miles and over 230 


160 


30 miles and over 20 


290 miles and over 260 . 


170 


40 miles and over 30 


320 miles and over 290 


175 




360 miles and over 320 


180 


80 miles and over 60 . .-. 


400 miles and over 360. 


190 


100 miles and over 80 


440 miles and over 400 


200 




480 miles and over 440 


210 


150 miles and over 125 


520 miles and over 480 


215 


175 miles and over 150 


569 miles and over 520 . . 


225 


200 miles and over 175 


600 miles and over 560.. 


235 









Rates over short or weak lines listed in Group D of Circular No. 352, shall 
be made by adding an arbitrary of twenty-five (25) cents per ton of 2,000 
pounds to the rates above, which arbitrary shall accrue solely to said short 
or weak lines. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued June 27, 1932. Clerk. 

Circular No. 356 (Cancels Circular No. 284). 



Freight Eates 157 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON— 

Marble, Granite and Stone (Crushed or Rubble), Stone Screenings, Gravel 
(Washed), Slag, Chert, Cinders, and Sand, in Straight or mixed carloads, 
carload minimum weight 90 per cent of marked capacity of car, except when 
cars are loaded to their visible capacity the actual weight will govern. 

Limestone, ground or pulverized, moving in open top equipment, C.L., 
minimum 90 per cent of marked capacity of car, except when cars are 
loaded to their visible capacity the actual weight will govern. For rates 
in other than open top equipment, see Circular No. 350, supplements 
thereto and reissues thereof.) 

As a result of hearing at Raleigh on April 8, 1931, the Commission pro- 
vided in Item 2, shown in Circular No. 346, rule governing the matter or 
rights of shipper and carrier respecting ordering and furnishing equipment 
of capacity desired for moving common brick and related articles. 

The Commission continually receives, from time to time, complaints cover- 
ing the same subject when related to sand, gravel and stone shipments and 
on which subject a hearing was held at Raleigh, August 25, 1931, and the 
Commission issued specific order to cover overcharge, dated September 2, 
1931, 

In view of the fact the matters and things herein referred to have been fully 
heard and rulings promulgated by the Commission thereon, amendment is 
hereby made to Circular No. 356, covering Sand, Gravel, Stone, etc., as follows: 

Where a carrier, for its own convenience, provides a car of greater capacity 
than that ordered by shipper, charges shall be assessed on basis of minimum 
weight fixed for car of capacity ordered; provided the shipment could have 
been loaded into car of the capacity ordered; and provided, further that where 
a car of greater capacity is accepted by shipper and loaded beyond the load- 
ing capacity of the car ordered, the minimum weight shall be that of a car 
of stencilled capacity next above the actual weight of the shipment. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued August 29, 1932. Clerk. 

Effective September 25, 1932. • 

Supplement No. 1 to Circular No. 356. 

MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON— 

Ice, loose or in packages (See Note), carload, minimum weight 40,000 pounds. 

Note. Not to exceed 2,000 pounds of chaff, hay, straw, shavings, sawdust 
or similar packing material will be carried free with each car of ice as a 
t)reservative. 



158 



N. C. Corporation Commission 





In Cents Per 100 Pounds 


Distances 


Scale "A" 


Scale "B" 


Scale "C" 




Single 


Joint 


Single 


Joint 


Single 


Joint 




3J^ 
4J^ 
5 
5 

5H 

6 

6 

7 

m 

8 
8 

9 

9^ 
10 


5 

5H 
6 

7 
7 
7 
8 
8 

m 

9 
9 

10 
10 

103^ 

lOH 

ny2 


4 

4H 

5K 
6 

7 
8 

W2 

9 
9 
9 
9 

9^ 
10 


6 

7 

7 

8 

8 

8H 

9 

9 

93^ 
lOK 
lOH 

113^ 

IIH 

113^ 


8 

8 

9 

9 

10 
10 
11 
11 
12 

12^ 
13 
13 

133^ 
14 
14 

143^ 
15 


8 




8 




9 




9 


25 miles and over 20 


10 


30 miles and over 25. 


10 


35 miles and over 30 


11 


40 miles and over 35 . . 


11 




12 


60 miles and over 50 - 


13 




14 




1434 


90 miles and over 80 ... .._ 


15 


100 miles and over 90 


15 


120 miles and over 100... 


153^ 


140 miles and over 120 


15>^ 


150 miles and over 140 


1Q}4 







On Ice moving for greater distances, apply 12th class (IT^^ per cent of 
first class), published in Agent Cottrell's North Carolina Tariff, I. C. C. 752, 
supplements thereto and reissues thereof. 

Scale "A" 

Application to common carriers in Groups A and B of Circular No. 352, 
supplements to and reissues thereof. 

Scale "B" 

Applicable to common carriers in Group C of Circular No. 352, supplements 
thereto and reissues thereof. The excess of Scale "B" over Scale "A" rates 
shall accrue solely to the line or lines in Group C. 

Scale "C" 

Applicable to common carriers named in Group D of Circular No. 352, sup- 
plements thereto or reissues thereof. The excess of Scale "C" over Scale "A" 
rates shall accrue solely to the line or lines in Group D. 

By order of the Commission: R. 0. Self, 

Issued August 23, 1932. Clerk. 

Effective September 25, 1932. 

Circular No. 357 (Cancels Circular No. 327). 



MAXIMUM FREIGHT RATES ON— 

Cotton ties and buckles, iron or steel, cotton baling, with or without buckles 
(attached), in bundles; and buckles, iron or steel, cotton baling tie, in bags, 
barrels, boxes or wired bundles, in straight or mixed carloads, minimum 
weight 30,000 pounds. 



Freight Rates 



159 



In Cents Per 100 Pounda 





Scale "A" 


Scale "B" 


Miles 


Scale "A" 


Scale "B" 


Miles 


S. L. 


J.L. 


S.L. 


J.L. 


S.L. 


J.L. 


S.L. 


J.L. 


1 through 5 


6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 


10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 


11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 


15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 


241 through 260 


26 
27 
28 
28 
29 
29 
30 
30 
31 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
35 
36 
37 
37 
38 
39 
39 


28 
28 
29 
29 
30 
30 
31 
31 
32 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
36 
37 
38 
38 
39 
40 
40 


31 
32 
33 
33 
34 
34 
35 
35 
36 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
40 
41 
42 
42 
43 
44 
44 


33 


6 through 10 


261 through 280 .„ 


33 


11 through 15 


281 through 300 


34 


16 through 20 


301 through 320 


34 


21 through 25 


321 through 340 


35 


26 through 30 


341 through 360 


35 


31 through 40 


361 through 380 


36 


41 through 50 . . . 


381 through 400 


36 


51 through 60 _ . 


401 through 420 


37 


61 through 70 


421 through 440 


37 


71 through 80 


441 through 460 


38 


81 through 90. 


461 through 480 


39 


91 through 100 


481 through 500 

501 through 520 —. 

521 through 540 . 


40 


101 through 120 


41 


121 through 140 


41 


141 through 160 


541 through 560 


42 


161 through 180 „. 


561 through 580 . 


43 


181 through 200 


581 through 600 . „ 


43 


201 through 220. 1 


601 through 620 . .. 


44 


221 through 240 


621 through 640 . . 


45 




641 through 660. . .. 


45 









S. L.— Single Line. 



J. L. — Joint Line. 



Scale "A" 

Applicable to common carriers in Groups A, B and C of Circular No. 352, 
supplements thereto and reissues thereof. 



Scale "B" 

Applicable to common carriers in Group D of Circular No. 352. The arbi- 
trary of five (5) cents in this scale over rates in Scale "A" shall accrue solely 
to Group D Carrier or Carriers. 

By order of the Commission. . R. O. Self, 

Issued September 14, 1932. Clerk. 

Effective October 1, 1932. 

Circular No. 358. 



Atlantic Coast Line Eailkoad Company 



161 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated in states of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama . 
Organized March 14, 1836 under laws of Virginia. 

President: Geo. B. Elliott Address: Wilmington, N. C. 
Secretary: H. L. Borden Address: New York, N. Y. 

Treasurer: P. Nichols Address: Wilmington, N. C. 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment _. 

Operating revenue 

*Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



Entire 



5,161.68 
4,849.91 
6,268 
$ 82,539,400.00 
1156,206,430.00 
$192,697,539.38 
« 80,465,656.61 
$ 63,019,956.88 
S 49,685,460.01 
$ 13,334,496.87 
$ 46,428,030.38 
$ 14,521,282.20 

1,799,052 
$ 5,525,000.00 



5,144.42 

4,832.65 

5,520 
S 82,539,400.00 
$155,142,130.00 
$193,548,018.65 
I 80, 546, 97). 33 
$ 54,088,004.97 
$ 43,188,470.55 
$ 10,899,534.42 
$ 41,390,424.28 
$ 11,033,372.71 

1,185, 893 
$ 4,775,000.00 



North Carolina 



1930 



1,076.45 
1,028.17 



$17,490, 
$23,100, 
$40,832, 
$17,050, 
$15,021, 
$11,842, 
$ 3,178, 
$11,480, 
$ 3,281, 



098. 86t 
142. 51t 
608. 51t 
672. 63 t 
102.69 
529.39 
573.30 
516.79 
148.68 



$ 1,361,930.01 



1931 



1,058.15 
1.009.87 



242,480.66t 

690.957.00t 

432,181.08t 

826, 263. 98 t 

646,730.63 

049,032.81 

597,697.82 

944,213.02 

496,799.17 

477,263 

,247,023.78 



*Interest on bonds not included. 
tEstimated on mileage basis. 



ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY 



Road operated between Mount Airy, N. C, and Sanford, N. C. Organized .January 31, 1899, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: Julian Price Address: Greensboro, N. C. 

Secretary: Guy E. Mauldin Address: Washington, D. C. 
Treasurer: C. W. Cloninger Address: Greensboro, N. C. 





Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles.. 


163.10 

163.10 

134 
$ 1,000,000.00 
$ 1,500,000.00 
$ 2,628,10.8.61 
$ 11,726.15 
$ l,04ft,241.82 
$ 778,982.98 
$ 261,258.84 
$ 966,793.33 
$ 52,681.09 

19,741 
$ 34,467.53 


163.10 


Road owned, miles— _ . 


163,10 


Number employees.- .- . ., 


126 


Capital stock 


S 1,000 000.00 


Funded debt . . 


$ 1,500,000.00 


Cost of road- - .... - 


$ 2,627,182.81 


Cost of equipment -. . 


$ 12,060.15 


Operating revenue 


$ 827,173.74 


•Operating expenses..- 


$ 736,846.85 


Net operating revenue . 


S 90,326.89 


Total freight revenue... .-_ . 


$ 770,707.65 


Total passenger train service revenue .... 


$ 38,662.68 


Number revenue passengers-.- 


13,765 


Taxes paid . 


$ 30 284.96 







Interest on bonds not included. 
11 



162 



N. C. CoKPOKATioN Commission 



CLINCHFIELD RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated in states of North Carolina, South Carolina, Kentucky, Virginia, and Tennesse*. 
Organized October 16, 1924 under laws of Interstate Commerce Commission. 

General Manager: L. H. Phettbplace Address: Erwin, Tennessee. 
General Solicitor: J. J, McLaughlin Address: Erwin, Tennessee. 
Treasurer: Jno. W. Sanders Addres?: Erwin, Tennessee. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 




309.29 
309.29 
455 


309.29 
309.29 
359 


117.40 
117.40 


117.40 




117.40 






Capital stock 






Funded debt 










Cost of road 










Cost of equipment 










Operating revenue .. _ 


$ 6,016,063.32 
$ 3,998,344.93 
S 2,017,718.39 
S 5,784,098.04 
$ 110,016.06 

142,733 
S 142,976.04 


$ 5,410,192.02 
$ 3,530,508.63 
S 1,879,683.39 
$ 5,247,585.05 
S 121,715.96 

97,345 
S 161,160.77 


5 2,428,420.29 
{ 1,376,029.38 
5 1,052,390.91 
S 2,350,260.14 
$ 58,102.26 

26,703 
% 38,452.75 


$ 2,212,881.33 




S 1,257,262.48 




S 955,628.85 




S 2,157,158.58 


Total passenger train service revenue.. 
Number revenue passengers 


$ 40,341.80 
19,435 


Taxes paid 


$ 88,413.29 







♦Interest on bonds not included. 



CAROLINA CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 

(Operated by Clinchfield Railroad Company) 



Road operated between Kentucky- Virginia State Line and North Carolina-South Carolina State 
Line. Organized January 26, 1905, under laws of Virginia. 

President: John B. Dexnis Address: New York, N. Y. 

Secretary and Treasurer: T. J. Cunningham Address: New York, N. Y. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 




266.36 
266.36 


266.36 
266.36 


117.40 
117.40 


117.40 




117.40 


Number employees 




Capital stock 


$ 25,000,000.00 
$ 28,007,053.00 
$ 51,253,841.76 
% 16,607,454.79 


$ 25,000,000.00 
S 27,443,000.00 
$ 51,275,828.10 
$ 16,563,605.13 


Sll,042,500.00t 
$12,342,684.96! 
$22,587,568.0.6t 
$ 7,318, 905. 32t 


$ll,042,500.00t 


Fuiided debt 


^12,094, 130. lot 


Cost of road 


$22, 597,257. 44t 


Cost of equipment 


$ 7,299, 580.78t 


Operating revenue 




*Operating expenses 










Net operating revenue 








































Taxes paid 





















^Interest on bonds not included. 



Cakolina and E'orth western Eaii^way Company 



163 



CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

Road operated between Chester, S. C, and Ed^emont, N. C. Organized July 18, 1835, under laws 



of North Carolina. 



President: Fairfax HarrisOxN' Address: Washington, D. C. 
Secretary: Guy E. Mauldin Address: Washington, D, C. 

Treasurer: M. Middleton Address: Wasliington, D. C. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


L33.54 

124.34 

103 
S 1,404,250.00 
$ 2,071,000.00 
$ 3,873,915.97 
$ 215,874.88 
$ 741,588.17 
S 569,714.85 
$ 171,873.32 
$ 697,474.39 
$ 35,017.67 

18,723 
$ 32,295.32 


133.54 
124.34 
92 
.$ 1,404,250.00 
$ 2,071,030.00 
5 3,892,922.36 
f 202,818.46 
S 704,577.97 
S 502,144.05 
$ 202,433.92 
S 670,571.99 
$ 26,110.33 

11,659 
S 31,010.74 


96.54 
87.34 


96.54 


Road owned, miles 


87.34 


Number employees 




Capital stock 


S 986,345.20 
5 1,454,670.40 
5 2,721,038.57 
5 151,630.50 
$ 625,004.87 
$ 452,788.95 
S 172, Ho. 62 
5 586,453.5* 
5 30,754.63 

15,813 
$ 24,230.29 


? 986,345.20 


Funded debt 


5 1,454,670.40 


Cost of road 


5 2,734,388.66 


Cost of equipment 


S 142,459.68 


Operating revenue 


5 596,386.77 


*Operating expenses 


5 398,970.51 


Net operating revenue 


$ 197,416.26 


Total freight revenue 


5 566,487.29 


Total passenger train service revenue.. 
Number revenue passengers 


S 23,019.44 
9,847 


Taxes paid 


:$ 23,597.25 







"Interest on bonds not included. 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 



Road operated in states of Virginia and North Carohna. Organized April 30, 1910, under laws of 
Virginia. 

President: Geo. R. LoXvALL Address: Norfolk, Va. 
Secretary: M. S. Hawkins Address: Norfolk, Va. 
Treasurer: J. F. George Address: Norfolk, Va. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


893 
789.83 
557 
S 16,000,009.00 
$ 16,038,030.00 
S 27,840.543.40 
$ 6,219,087.76 
$ 6,901,454.82 
S 5,371,083.52 
5 1,530,371.30 
$ 6,260,730.94 
$ 493,080.21 

453,142 
3 621,673.10 


893 
789.83 
546 
S 16,000,003.00 
B 15,677,200.00 
$ 27,869,186.76 
$ 6,182,390.85 
5 6,017,064.54 
f 4,957,423.37 
$ 1,059,641.17 
$ 5,538,542.81 
$ 372,916.75 

397,658 
$ 524,358.13 


818.67 
679.79 


818 67 


Road owned, miles . 


679.79 


Number employees 




Capital stock 


$13,770,720.00 
.$13,803,425.46 
.$23,961,520.48 
.$ 5,352,582.26 
$ 6,036,020.71 
S 4,697,834.92 
$ 1,338,185.79 
S 5,570,279.21 
$ 386,687.54 

139,061 
$ 534,347.44 


513,770,720.00 
$13,492,895.72 
523,986,172.97 
J 5,320,998.33 


Funded debt 


Cost of road .. 


Cost of equipment 


Operating revenue. 


5 5,288,883.03 
5 4,357,510.56 
5 931,372.47 
5 4 944 887 45 


•Operating expenses .. 


Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 


Total passenger train service revenue.. 
Number revenue passengers 


S 280,872.67 
81,530 


Taxes paid 


5 451,210.15 







"Interest on bonds not included. 



164 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



ATLANTIC AND NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated between Goldsboro, N. C , and Morehead City, N. C. Organized January 20, 1854* 
under laws of North Carolina. 

President: Luther Hamilton Address: Morehead City, N. C. 

Secretary and Treasurer: W. J. Boyd Address: Ayden, N. C. 





Entire — North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 






Road owned, miles 


95.82 


95.82 


Number employees 






$ 1,797,200.00 
$ 325,000.00 
$ 1,785,200.00 
$ 325,000.00 


$ 1,797,200.00 


Funded debt . 


$ 325,000.00 




$ 1,785,200.00 




$ 325,000.00 












Net operating revenue 






Total freight revenue 






Total passenger train service revenue 






Number revenue passengers . .. _ 






Taxes paid . ..--.- 













♦Interest on bonds not included. 

Note. This road is operated by Norfolk Southern Railroad Company and revenues, operating 
expenses, and other information are included in their report. 



DURHAM AND SOUTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

(Opebated by Norfolk Southern Railroad) 

Road operated between Durham, N. C, and Duncan, N. C. Organized January 20, 1905, under laws 
of North Carolina. 

President: H. L. Williams Address: Lynchburg, Va. 

Secretary and Treasurer: Jambs R. Gilliam Address: Lynchburg, Va. 



Entire — North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of roa'd - 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

*Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue- 
Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



38.08 
38.08 



38.08 



"Interest on bonds not included. 



Norfolk and Western Railway Company 



166 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 



Road operated in states of Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, Kentucky, Ohio, 
Georgia, Oklahoma, Florida. Missouri, District of Columbia, Illinois. Tennessee. Colorado, Arkansas, 
Massachusetts, Indiana. South Carolina, Utah, Alabama, California, and Michigan. Organized January 
15, 1896, under laws of Virginia. 

President: A. C. Needles Address: Roanoke, Va. 

Secretary and Assistant Treasurer: I. W. Booth Address: Philadelphia, Pa. 
* Treasurer: Jos. B. Lacy Address: Roanoke. Va. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 


Road operated, m,iles 


2,236.62 
2,202.58 
5,943 
$163,640,600.00 
$111,995,531.92 
$316,169,913.01 
$135,632,425.47 
$100,530,458.06 
$ 59,675,725.10 
$ 40,854,732.96 
$ 93,168,818.78 
$ 6,016,639.46 

1,791,416 
$ 9,850,000.00 


2,266.86 

2,227.5 

4,662 
$163,640,600.00 
$101,401,531.92 
$324,841,861.78 
$136,626,505.33 
$ 79,854.747.93 
$ 50.594.814.44 
$ 29,259,933.49 
$ 74,293,921.59 
$ 4,487,884.66 

1,192,948 
J 8,150,000.00 


131.01 
130.70 


130.96 


Road owned, miles 


130.76 


Number employees 




Capital stock 


$ 9,703,887.58t 
$ 6,641,335.04t 
$18.748,875.84t 
$ 8,043,002.82t 
S 1.028.985.55 
$ 1,287,882.05 
$ 258,896.50 
$ 908,986.89 
$ 95.611.18 

42.757 
$ 187,949.24 


$ 9,605,703.22t 


Funded debt 


$ 5,952,699.22t 


Cost of road 


$19,068,217.28t 


Cost of equipmipnt - 


$ 8,019,975.86t 




$ 909,864.93 




$ 1,139,708.63 




$ 229,842.70t 




$ 819,826.75 


Total passenger train service revenue- - 


$ 71.968.64 
25.820 


Taxes paid . ... 


$ 134,168.81 







"Interest on bonds not included. 



tEsti mated on mileage basis. 



tin red. 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY COMPANY 



Road operated in states of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida. 
Organized August 5, 1897, under laws of Virginia. 
Receiver: L. R. Powell, Jr. 
Receiver: E. W. Smith 
Secretary and Treasurer: T. W. Mathews 



.Address: Norfolk, Va. 
Address: Norfolk, Va. 
Address: Norfolk, Va. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles. 


4.481.12 
3.442.53 
4.873 
$85,110,662.21 
$177,024,214.84 
$184,198,811.30 
$ 60.531,838.64 
$ 49.679,048.03 
$ 39,649.874.91 
5 10,029,174.91 
$ 39,190.861.13 
$ 8,741,795.11 

1,025,100 
$ 3,397.977.08 


4.469.38 
3,433.33 
4,387 
$ 85,110,662.21 
$164,551,746.21 
$185,327,632.73 
$ 57,279,225.07 
$42,303,665.66 
$ 35,649.906.39 
$ 6.653.759.27 
$ 34,014,177.91 
$ 6,960.211.58 

742.741 
$ 3.172.498.96 


631.58 
627.35 


629.87 


Road owned, miles 


627.35 


Number employees . . . 




Capital stock 


$15,507, 162. 65t 
$32.253.811.93t 
$33.561,023.41t 
$ll,028,895.53t 
$11,902,421.52 
$ 9,500,185.67 
$ 2,402,235.85 
$10,005,913.55 
$ 1,710,042.25 

212,136 
$ 728,572.07 


$15,549,717,981 
$30,063,604.03t 


Funded debt 


Cost of road 


$33,859,358.49t 


Cost of equipment . 


$10,464,914.42t 




$10,073,800.23 




$ 8,489,347.86 




$ 1,584,452.37 


Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue.. 
Number revenue passengers 


$ 8,590,813.30 

$ 1,344,068.51 

151,792 


Taxes paid 


$ 682,012.21 







^Interest on bonds not included. 



tEsti mated on mileage 



166 



N. C. CoKPOKATioN Commission 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 



Road operated in states of Virginia, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, 
Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, IlHnois, and District of Columbia. Organized June 18, 1894, under 
laws of Virginia. 

President: Fairfax Harrison Address: Washington, D. C. 

Secretary: C. E. A. McCarthy Address: New York, N. Y. 

Treasurer: Maury Middleton Address: Washington, D. C. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 




6,730.48 
4,246.05 
9,523 
1195,470,200.00 
$294,493,500.00 
$379,504,723.72 
$144,453,213.02 
$118,868,607.67 
$ 89,162,915.92 
$ 29,705,691.75 
I 91,799,046.16 
$ 23,594,992.07 

4,633,872 
$ 8,383,820.91 


6,724.24 
4,243.76 
7,944 
$195,470,200.00 
$290,465,300.00 
$379,781,336.38 
$142,728,054.36 
$ 97,715,111.56 
$ 79,783,959.19 
$ 17,931,152.37 
$ 77,440,284.44 
$ 17,654,386.73 

3,283,307 
$ 7,311,318.04 


1,204.01 
591.00 


1,204.01 


Road owned, miles 


591 00 


Number employees 




Capital stock 


$27,189,904.82! 

$40,964,045.85! 

$52,789,107.06! 

$20,093,441.93! 

$24,164,512.34 

$18,245,406.51 

$ 5,919,105.83 

$19,018,048.60 

$ 4,626,635.25 

1,339,775 
$ 2, .308, 557. 69 


$27,209,451.84! 
540 432,769.76! 


Funded debt 




J52, 865, 562.02! 
119,867,745.17! 
$20,380,486.95 








$16,533,735.16 




$ 3,846,751.79 


Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. . 
Number revenue passengers 


$16,543,710.79 

$ 3,468,048.93 

947,138 


Taxes paid 


$ 2,218,505.38 







♦Interest on bonds not included. 



!Estimated on mileage basis. 



ASHEVILLE AND CRAGGY MOUNTAIN RAILWAY 



Road operated between Craggy, N. C, and Newbridge, N. C. Organized July 22, 1890, under laws 
of North Carolina. 

President: Fairfax Harrison Address: Washington, D. C. 
Secretary: C. E. A. McCarthy Address: New York, N. Y. 
Treasurer: M. Middleton Address: Washington, D. C. 



Entire — North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

'Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service- 
Number revenue passengers.. 
Taxes paid 



4.74 
4.74 
10 
$ 24,200.00 



4.74 
4.74 
10 
S 24,200.00 



42,297.69 



$ 19,433.77 

$ 24,302.43 

$ 4,868.66J 

$ 19,232.63 



943.17 



42,297.69 



$ 12,910.66 

$ 22,577.72 

$ 9,667.06t 

.$ 12,719.47 



878.83 



'Interest on bonds not included. 



Jin red. 



AsHEViLLE Southern Railway 



167 



ASHEVILLE SOUTHERN RAILWAY 

(Operated by Asheville and Craggy Mountain Railroad Company) 

Road operated between Connection Asheville (Southern Ry. Co., N. C), and Glenns Creek, N. C. 
g: Organized December 29, 1905, under laws of North Carolina. 

President: Fairfax Harrison Address: Washington, D. C. 
Secretary: Guy E. Mauldin Address: Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer: M. Middletov Address: Washington, D. C. 



Entire — North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles.. 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road, 

Cost of equipment _. 

Operating revenue 

•Operating expenses. 

Net operating revenue _ 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



2.27 
2.27 



2.27 
2.27 



$ 60,000.00 
$ 55,582.93 



$ 60,000.00 
$ 55,582.93 



♦Interest on bonds not included. 



THE ATLANTA AND CHARLOTTE AIR LINE RAILWAY CO. 

(Operated by Southern Railway Company) 

Road operated between Charlotte, N. C, and Armour, Ga. Organized April 4, 1877, under laws of 
North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. 

President: George F. Canfield Address: New York, N.Y. 
Secretary: J, Morse Hubbard Address: New York, N. Y. 
Treasurer: John W. Platten Address: New York, N. Y. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 




255.44 

255.44 

5 

$ 1,700,000.00 
$ 20,000,000.00 

I 21,700,000.00 


255.44 
255.44 
5 
$ 1,700,000.00 
? 20,000,000.00 

I 21,700,000.00 


42.64 
42.64 


42.64 


Road owned, n\iles ... 


42.64 


Number employees . 




Capital stock 


$ 283,730.00t 
$ 3,338, OOO.OOt 

$ 3,621,730.00! 


3 283,730.00t 


Funded debt 


J 3,338,000.001 
S 3,621,730.00t 


Cost of road and 
Cost of equipment . 


Operating revenue 


♦Operating expenses _. _ 










Net operating revenue 










Total freight revenue . 










Total passenger train service revenue.. 










Number revenue passengers . 










Taxes paid.. 





















"Interest on bonds not included. 



tEstimated on mileage basis. 



168 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



THE ATLANTIC AND DANVILLE RAILWAY COMPANY 

(Operated by Southern Railway Company) 

Road operated between Norfolk, Va., and Danville, Va. Organized August 2, 1894, under laws of 
Virginia. 

President: Edgar Newgass Address: London, England. 

Secretary and Treasurer: J. A. D. Parrish Address: Norfolk, Va. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 




277.71 
277.71 
3 
$ 2,180,000.00 
S 5,450,000.00 
$ 7,610,484.35 
$ 36,820.25 


277.71 
277.71 
3 
$ 2,180,000.00 
% 5,450,000.00 
$ 7,610,484.35 
$ 36,820.25 


22.15 
22.15 


22.15 




22.15 






Capital stock i 


$ 173,746.00t 
$ 434,365.00t 
$ 606,555.00t 
$ 2,934.571 


$ 173,746.00t 


Funded debt 


$ 434,365.00t 


Cost of road 


J 606, 555. cot 


Cost of equipment 


$ 2,934.57t 


Operating revenue . 




*Operating expenses.. 





















Total freight revenue... 




















Number revenue passengers 










Taxes paid 





















*Interest on bonds not included. 



tEstimated on rajleage basis. 



CAROLINA AND TENNESSEE SOUTHERN RAILWAY CO. 



Road operated between Bushnell, N. C, and Fontana. N. C. Organized August 29, 1902, under laws 
of North Carolina. 

President: Fairfax Harrison Address: Washington, D. C. 
Secretary: Guy E. Mauldin Address: Washington, D. C. 
Treasurer: M. Middleton Address: Washington, D. C. 




Entire— North Carolina 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number em ployees 

Capital st ock 

Funded debt.. 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment -- 

Operati ng revenue 

*Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue- 
Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid. 



15.77 
13.96 
6 
$ 60,000.00 

$ 643,000.00 
$ 577,608.10 



15.77 
13.96 
6 
$ 60,000.00 
I 643,000.00 
$ 577,608.10 



97,007.94 
25,629.47 
71,378.47 
46,914.40 

1,583.82 

1,489 

1,857.13 



53,323.85 
22,926.48 
30,397.37 
25,246.71 

1,404.57 

1,104 

2,445.08 



* Interest on bonds not included. 



Danville and Western Railway 



169 



DANVILLE AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



Road operated between Danville, Va., and Stuart, Va., and Branches. 

President: Fairfax Harrison Address: Washington, D. C. 
Secretary: Guy E. Mauldin Address: Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer: M. Middleton Address: Washington, D. C. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


81.89 
81.89 
173 
1 368,600.00 
$ 2,197,773.75 
$ 2,015,259.41 
$ 233,935.60 
$ 453,405.66 
$ 326,081.44 
$ 127,324.22 
S 420,443.58 
$ 22,839.30 
9,985 


81.89 
81.89 
160 
$ 368,600.00 
$ 2,197,773.75 
$ 2,010,712.82 
$ 229,255.11 
$ 483,622.38 
$ 306,287.92 
$ 177,334.46 
$ 460,249.93 
$ 17,332.80 
6,437 


8.96 
8.96 


8.96 


Road owned, miles 


8.96 


Number employees 




Capital stock . . . 


$ 40,324. 84t 
$ 240,436.45t 
$ 220,469.38t 
1 25,592.34t 
$ 49,692.57t 
$ 35,673.091 
$ I3,929.48t 
$ 45,996.52t 
$ 2.498. 81t 


B 40,324.84t 


Funded debt . 


$ 240,436.45t 


Cost of road .. 


S 219,971.93t 


Cost of equipment -- . 


$ 25,08a.51t 




$ 52,908.23t 




S 33,507.90t 




$ I9,400.38t 




8 50,351.34t 


Total passenger train service revenue. - 


S l,896.20t 


Taxes paid 


$ 2,336.48 


$ 4,112.60 











interest on bonds not included. 



tEsti mated on mileage basis. 



High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and Southern Railroad Company 

Road operated between High Point, N. C, and Asheboro, N. C. Organized February 26, 1887, under 
laws of North Carolina. 



President: Fairfax Harrison 
Secretary: Guy E. Mauldin 
Treasurer: M. Middleton 



Address: Washington, D. C. 
Address: Washington, D. C. 
Address: Washington, D. C. 





Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles.. 


34.20 
26.85 
13 
$ 248,400.00 
$ 402,000.00 
$ 685,812.57 


34.04 


Road owned, miles 


26.85 


Number employees 


14 


Capital stock 


$ 243,400.00 




$ 402,000.00 




$ 685,829.93 


Cost of equipment 




Operating revenue , 


$ 80,338.62 
$ 77,015.11 
$ 3,323.51 
$ 75,527.22 
$ 2,543.97 

914 
$ 6.865.43 


$ 60,962.03 


♦Operating expenses 


$ 73,988.34 


Net operating revenue 


$ 13,026.31{ 


Total freight revenue 


$ 56,940.00 


Total passenger train service revenue _ 


$ 2,376.18 


Number revenue passengers 


447 


Taxes paid 


$ 7,477.84 







•Interest on bonds not incladad. 



tin red. 



170 



'N. C. Corporation Commission 



THE NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

(Operated by Southern Railway Company) 

Road operated between Goldsboro, N. C, and Charlotte, N. C. Organized January 27, 1849, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: Mrs. T. W. Bickett Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

Secretary and Treasurer: D. F. Giles Address: Marion, N. C. 





Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles.. . 






Road owned, miles.. .. .. 


224.12 


224.12 


Num.ber employees _ . 




Capital stock 


$ 4,000,000.00 


$ 4,000,000.00 


Funded debt. — 




Cost of road . 


1 4,944,927.53 


■1 4,944,927.53 


Cost of equipment 
















Net operating revenue ...... 






Total freight revenue 






Total passenger train service revenue 






Number revenue passengers 






Taxes paid 













*Interest on bonds not included. 



THE NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

(Operated by Southern Railway Company) 

N. C, and Mines, N. C. Organized March 13, 1899, under laws 



Road operated between Virgilina, 
of North Carolina. 

President: Fairfax Harrison 
Secretary: C. E. A. McCarthy 
Treasurer: Maury Middleton 



Address: Washington, D. C. 
Address: Washington, D. C. 
Address: Washington, D. C. 



Entire— North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees.. .-. 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

*Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue... 

Total passenger train service revenue- 
Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



4.79 



4.79 



$ 50,000.00 
$ 50,000.00 



$ 50,000.00 
$ 50,000.00 



•Interest on bonds not included. 



N. O. Midland Railroad Company 



171 



THE NORTH CAROLINA MIDLAND RAILROAD COMPANY 

(Operated by Southern Railway Company) 

Road operated between Mooresville, N. C, and Winston-Salem, N. C. Organized September 9, 1880» 
under laws of North Carolina. 

President: Fairfax Harrison Address: Washington, D. C. 
Secretary: Guy E. Mauldin Address: Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer: M. Middleton Address: \^'a'?hington, D. C. 



Entire — North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock.. 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost or equipment 

Operating revenue 

*Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue... 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



53.50 



53.50 



$ 924,000.00 
$ 801,000.00 
$ 1,721,939.00 



$ 924,000.00 
$ 801,000.00 
$ 1,722,230.04 



♦Interest on bonds not included. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY— CAROLINA DIVISION 

(Operated by Southern Railway Company) 

Road operated in states of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Organized May 15. 1902, 
under laws of South Carolina. 

President: Fairfax Harrison Address: Washington, D. C. 
Secretary: Guy E. Mauldin Address: Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer: M. Middleton Address: Washington, D. C. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles.— . 












698.03 


698.03 


106.68 


106.68 








$ 4,176,200.00 
$ 6,009,500.00 
$ 14,892,807.75 
$ 631,406.19 


$ 4,176,200.00 
$ 6,009,500.00 
J 14,891,794.31 
$ 631,406.19 


$ 638,123.36! 
$ 918,251.60t 
$ 2,275,621.02t 
$ 96,478. 86t 


$ 638,123.36t 


Funded debt 


$ 918,251.60t 


Cost of road 


$ 2,275 466 17t 


Cost of equipment 


$ 96,478.86t 


Operating revenue . 


*Operating expenses 










Net operating revenue 










Total freight revenue 






























Taxes paid 





















"Interest on bonds not included. 



fEstimated on mileage basis. 



172 



N, C. Corporation Commission 



STATE UNIVERSITY RAILROAD COMPANY 



Road operated b tween University, N. C, and Chapel Hill, N. C. Organized April 12, 1879, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: Fairfax Harrison Address: Washington, D. C. 
Secretary: Guy E. Mauldin Address: Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer: M. Middleton Address: Washington, D. C. 



Entire — North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

•Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue- 
Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



10.15 
10.15 
8 
31,300.00 



79,628.51 



32,598.52 
39,216.79 

6,618.27t 
29,250.81 

3,334.64 

3,946 
899.09 



10.15 
10.15 



31,300.00 



79,803.89 



37,324.54 

10,624.66J 

24,242.89 

2,449.66 

1,498 
824.45 



•Interest on bonds not included. 



tin red. 



TALLULAH FALLS RAILWAY COMPANY— J. F. Gray, Receiver 

Road operated between Cornelia, Ga., and Franklin, N. C. Organized March 8, 1898, under laws 
of Georgia. 

President: R. B. Pegram Address: Atlanta, Ga. 

Secretary: Guy E. Mauldin Address: Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer: M, Middleton Address: Washington, D. C. 



Entire 



1930 



1931 



North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt -.. 

Cost of road ..- 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

•Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue- 
Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



57.10 
57.10 



57.10 
57.10 



$ 323,400.00 

$ 1,519,000.00 

$ 1,632,148.70 

$ 60,713.24 



$ 323,400.00 

S 1,519,000.00 

$ 1,631,974.43 

$ 59,200.80 



79. 265.341 

372,306.90! 

400, 039. 64 t 

14,880. 08t 

32,639.05 

39,999.55 

7,360.50 

20,079.02 

10,838.81 

2,017 



79.265. 34t 

372. 306.901 

399,996.93t 

14. 510. lit 

13.822.66 

34,354.53 

20,531. 87t 

8,590.24 

3,942.12 

1,365 



"Interest on bonds not included. 



Jin red. 



tEslimated on mileage basis. 



Yadkin Eailroad Company 



173 



YADKIN RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated between Salisbury, N. C, and Norwood, N. C. Organized August 19, 1895, under 
laws of North Carolina. 



President: Fairfax Harrison 
Secretary: Guy E. Mauldin 
Treasurer: M, Middleton 



Address: Washington, D. C. 
Address: Washington, D. C. 
Address: Washington, D. C. 




Entire — North Carolina 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road— 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

*Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue- 
Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



41.87 
40.52 
35 
625,000.00 
615,000.00 
1,375,996.51 
9,261.35 
266,190.15 
204,564.40 
61,625.75 
256,184.44 
8,224.23 



10,751.49 



41.87 

40.52 

37 

625,000.00 

615,000.00 

,376,905.94 



227,035.09 

174,300.70 

52,794.39 

218,522.38 

6,894.92 



10,307.47 



*Interest on bonds not included. 



WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILWAY COMPANY 



Road operated between Winston-Salem, N. C, 
under laws of North Carolina. 

President: H. E. Fries 
Secretary: J. F. Post 
Treasurer: P. Nichols 



and Wadesboro, N. C. Organized February 13, 1905, 

Address: Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Address: Wilmington, N. C. 
Address: Wilmington, N, C. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


98.19 
87.70 




98.19 
87.70 

145 
$ 1,245,000.00 
$ 5,000,000.00 
$ 6,199,372.34 
$ 536,286.43 
$ 1,260,140.63 
$ 830,725.75 
$ 429,414.88 
$ 1,193,830.59 
$ 52,210.83 

10,387 
$ 113,000.00 


98.19 


Road owned, miles... 




87.70 


Number employees 




131 


Capital stock 






$ 1,245,000 00 


Funded debt . 






$5,000 000 00 


Cost of road . ... 






$ 6,204,928 44 


Cost of equipment 






$ 536,286 43 


Operating revenue . 






$ 1,130,269 81 


•Operating expenses 






$ 741,490.06 


Net operating revenue 






$ 388,779.75 


Total freight revenue _ 






$ 1,079,512.57 


Total passenger train service revenue.. 






$ 38.116.25 


Number revenue passengers 






7,503 


Taxes paid 






$ 103.000.00 









•Interest on bonds not included. 



174 



W. C. CoKPOKATioN Commission 



ABERDEEN AND ROCKFISH RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated between Aberdeen, N. C, and Fayetteville, N. C. Organized June 22, 1892, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: W. A. Blue Address: Aberdeen, N. C. 

Secretary and Treasurer: H. McC. Blue Address: Aberdeen, N. C. 



Entire— North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

*Operati ng expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 





44.9 




44.9 




44.9 




44.9 




53 




51 


$ 


200,300.00 




200,300.00 


$ 


143,000.00 




127,000.00 


$ 


383,807.88 




383,914.34 


$ 


62,765.49 




63,220.15 


$ 


182,678.68 




155,179.64 


$ 


132,488.55 




108,822.67 


$ 


50,190.13 




46,356.97 


$ 


173,384.64 




147,285.09 


$ 


7,836.88 




7,142.16 




3,134 




1,871 


s 


8,303.95 


$ 


5,801.69 



*Intere8t on bonds not included. 



APPALACHIAN RAILWAY COMPANY 



Road operated between Ela, N. C, and Ravensford, N. C. Organized .July 30, 1908, under laws of 
North Carolina. 

President: A. J. Stevens Address: New York, N. Y. 

Secretary and Treasurer: J. R. Alloy Address: Waynesville, N. C. 




Road operated, miles 

Road owned 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue ($313.07 non-operating revenue not in- 
cluded) 

*Operating expenses ($2,628.88 non-operating expenses not 

included) 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



Entire — North Carolina 



10.00 

10.00 

12 

100,000.00 

30,000.00 

323,093.83 

10,085.14 

15,307.71 

28,728.24 

13,420.531 

13,553.50 

291.61 
9.49 

690.00 



10.00 

10.00 

8 

100,000.00 

30,000.00 

323,093.83 

10,085.14 

9,786.66 1[ 

26,584.47§ 
16,797.8U 
8,637.87 
63.80 



85.50 



* nterest on bonds not included. 
1I$92.40 not included. 



Jin red. 
§$2,132.? 



not included. 



Atlantic and Carolina Railroad Company 



175 



ATLANTIC AND CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 



Road operated between Kenansville, N, C, and Warsaw, N. C. Organized April 21, 1914, under laws 
of North Carolina. 



President: R. G. Turnbull, 
Secretary and Treasurer: W. J. Jones 



Address: Norfolk, Va. 
Address: Norfolk, Va. 




Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operati ng revenue 

*Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



Entire — North Carolina 



10.00 
10.00 
16 

10,000.00 

34,000.00 

66,230.00 

2,146.23 

14,239.11 

16,484.24 

2,245.13$ 

12,455.69 

112.14 

390 

830.15 



10.00 
10.000 
17 

10,000.00 

34,000.00 

66,230.00 

2,146.23 

7,037.67 

11,080.20 

4,042.53t 

5,264.92 

78.40 

313 

654.61 



*Interest on bonds not included. 



Jin red. 



ATLANTIC AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 



Road operated between Sanford, N. C, and Lillington, N. C. Organized August 1, 1927, under laws 
of North Carolina. 



President: H. C. Hugger, Jr. 
Secretary: W. R. Sullivan 
Treasurer: W. R. Williams 



Address: New York, N. Y. 
Address: New York, N. Y. 
Address: Sanford, N. C. 





Entire — North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


24.00 

24.00 

38 
$ 62,000.00 
$ 60,000.00 
$ 130,502.57 
$ 19,134.64 
$ 108,562.96 
$ 95,268.26 
S 13,294.70 
$ 101,965.45 
S 5,716.02 

4,959 
$ 1,997.97 


24.00 




24.00 


Number employees 


33 


Capital stock 


$ 62,000.00 


Funded debt 


S 60,000.00 


Cost of road 


$ 130,511.07 


Cost of equipment 


$ 19,134.64 


Operating revenue . _ . _ 


$ 61,684.73 


*Operating expenses 


$ 53,155.93 


Net operating revenue 


$ 8,528.80 


Total freight revenue . _ 


$ 56,073.48 


Total passenger train service revenue 


$ 1,046.25 


Number revenue passengers 


3,331 


Taxes paid.. 


S 1,794 24 







•Interest on bonds not included. 



176 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



BLACK MOUNTAIN RAILWAY COMPANY 

Road operated between Kona, N. C, and Burnsville, N. C. Organized April 21, 1910, under laws 
of North Carolina. 



President: John B. Dennis 
Secretary: J. B. Beitton, Jr. 
Treasurer: John W. Sanders 



Address: New York, N. Y. 
Address: Erwin, Tenn. 
Address: Erwin, Tenn. 





Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


12.83 

12.83 

16 
1 50,000.00 
$ 600,000.00 
$ 232,900.78 
$ 7,310.28 
$ 31,998.60 
$ 40,104.43 
$ 8,105.83{ 
$ 31,698.36 
$ 147.24 


12 83 


Road opwned, miles . 


12 83 


Number employees .- 


11 


Capital stock 

Funded debt ($150,000.00 matured unpaid) . 


$ 50,000.00 
$ 600,000.001F 
$ 226,877.01 






$ 7,310.28 


Operating revenue 


$ 22,915.78 
$ 19 882 60 


*Operating expenses 


Net operating revenue 


$ 3,033.18 


Total freight revenue ... 


$ 22 613.70 


Total passenger train service revenue (express) 


1 97.15 


Number revenue passengers 






$ 1,988.50 


$ 2,095.00 







"Interest on bonds not included. 



tin red. 



1[$175,000.00 matured unpaid. 



BONLEE AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 



Road operated between Bonlee, N. C, and Bennett, N. C. Organized October 12, 
of North Carolina. 



under laws 



President: R. L. Caveness 

Secretary and Treasurer: R. L. Caveness 



Address: Coleridge, N. C. 
Address: Coleridge, N. C. 



Entire — North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees. 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

•Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers. -.. 

Taxes paid 



11.37 

11.37 
5 
61,600.00 

7,500.00 
61,600.00 



10,087.00 

11,278.78 

1,191.781 

10,087.00 



180.00 



11.37 
10.37 
5K 

61,500.00 
7,500.00 

61,500.00 
3,000.00 
7,050.00 
9,000.00 
l,950.00t 
7,050.00 



•Interest on bonds not included. 



tin red. 



Cape Feae Railways, Inc. 



177 



CAPE FEAR RAILWAYS, INCORPORATED 

Road operated between Skibo, N. C, and Fort Junction, N. C. Organized October 1. 1921. under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: H. A. Page, Jr. Address: Aberdeen, N. C. 

Secretary and Treasurer: E.T. Latting, Ja. Addret^s: Aberdeen, N, C 



Entire — North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees. 

Capital stock 

Funded debt , 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

•Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue. 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Nuniber revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



20 
5 

14 
23,300.00 
24,000.00 
63,258.81 



43,505.91 
36,784.35 
3,200.56 
43,505.91 



404.88 



20 
5 

14 
23,300.00 
24.000.00 
63,258.81 



43,505.91 

36,784.35 

3,200.56 

43,505.91 



404. 



"Interest on bonds not included. 



CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 



Road operated between Kinston, N. C, and Snow Hill, N. C. Organized December 11, 1912, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: G. R. Lotall. Address: Norfolk, Va. 
Secretary: M. S. Hawkins Address: Norfolk, Va. 
Treasurer: J. F. George Address: Norfolk, Va. 




Entire — North Carolina 



Road operated, miles. 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

•Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Number revenue passengers. 

Taxes paid 



15.228 
13,095 
17 

35,000.00 
39,000.00 
95,156.58 

4,559.02 
12,151.94 
19,169.43 

7,017. 49J 

11,706.55 

231.60 

1,930 

1,020.63 



•Interest on bonds not included. 



tin red. 



Ceased operation July 31, 1931 



178 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



Carolina and North Eastern Railroad Company — Eric Norfleet, Rec. 

Road operated between Gumberry, N. C, and Lasker, N. C. Organized January 8, 1917, under laws 
of North Carolina. 

General Manager: H. O. Carlton Address: Jackson, N. C. 



Entire— North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Num ber em ployees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

*Operating expenses. .- 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 





11 


$ 


300,000.00 


$ 


199,000.00 


$ 


412,371.44 


$ 


20,822.35 


s 


15,433.95 


$ 


17,723.22 


$ 


2,289.27i 


s 


15,095.01 



138.55 



*Interest on bonds not included. 



tin red. 



CAROLINA AND NORTHEASTERN RAILROAD COMPANY 



Road operated between Gumberry, N, C, and Jackson, N. C. Organized July 30, 1931, under laws 
of North Carolina. 

President: Herman O. Carlton Address: Boykins, Va. 

Secretary and Treasurer: H. Otis Carlton Address: Jackson, N. C. 



Entire— North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue.. 

*Operati ng expenses 

Net operating revenue... 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers. 

Taxes paid 



8K2 





14 


$ 


3,600.00 




3,600.00 




1,561.28 




8,406.87 




6,687.07 




1,719.80 




8,406.87 



121.11 



*Interest on bonds not included. 



Cae,olina Southern Railway Company 



179 



THE CAROLINA SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

Road operated between Windsor, N. C, and Ahoskie, N. C. Organized August, 1926, under laws 
of North Carolina. 

President: S. Wade Mare (1930) Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

W. H. Knapp (1931) 
Secretary: J. H. Matthews 
Treasurer: W. L. Lyon 



Address: Canandaigua, N. Y. 
Address: Windsor, N. C. 
Address: Windsor, N. C. 



Entire — North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

♦Operating expenses..- 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue .... 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



21.55 

21.55 

29 
168,800.00 

2,300.00 
168,838.19 
22,637.24 
37,590.67 
32,435.65 

5,155.02 
36,670.82 



724.66 



22 
22 
18 
168,800.00 
1,100.00 
168,838.19 
22,637.24 
26,198.26 
25,470.72 
727.54 
25,363.17 
18.44 
25 
532.59 



"Interest on bonds not included. 

CLIFFSIDE RAILROAD COMPANY 



Road operated between Cliffside, N. C, and West Henrietta and Avondale, N. C. Organized 1905 
under laws of North Carolina. 

President: Charles H. Haynes Address: Chffside, N. C. 
Secretary: H.M.Owens Address: Cliffside, N. C. 

Treasurer: Z. O. Jenkins Address: Chffside, N. C. 





Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


5 

5 

14 

$ 80,000.00 

$ 10,500.00 

$ 130,760.47 

$ 20,951.29 

$ 26,201.75 

$ 24,020.23 

$ 2,302.97 

$ 25,289.08 

1.35 

15 

$ 733.13 


5 


Road owned, miles 


5 


Number employees. ... 


14 


Capital stock ... . 


$ 80 000 00 


Funded debt 


$ 9,000.00 
$ 130,742.02 
$ 21 109 29 


Cost of road . .. 


Cost of equipment . 


Operating revenue 


S 23,887.63 
% 18,014.72 
$ 5,872.91 
$ 23.155.00 
.90 


•Operating expenses 


Net operating revenue . 


Total freight revenue 


Total passenger train service revenue.. 


Number revenue passengers .. 


9 


Taxes paid 


$ 566.20 





"Interest on bonds not included. 



180 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



DOVER AND SOUTH BOUND RAILROAD 



Road operated between Dover, N. C, and Richlands, N. C. Organized December, 1918, under lawa 
of North Carolina. 



President: W. K. Wimsatt 

Secretary and Treasurer: W. B. H. Blandford 


\ddres3: Washington, D. C. 
Address: Dover N. C. 




Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 




24.75 
24.75 
15H 
$ 100,000.00 








Number employees 




Capital stock 




Funded debt 




Cost of road . . . _. .. . .. 


$ 164,240.98 
$ 22,250.81 
$ 12,817.83 
$ 28,028.55 
$ 15,210 72t 
S 12.536.83 




Cost of equipment 
















Total freight revenue 




Total passenger train service revenue 




Number revenue passengers. - _.- 






Taxes paid 


$ 1,631.01 









*Interest on bonds not included. 



Jin red. 



Ceased operation July 31, 1931. 



DURHAM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 



Road operated between East Durham, N. C, and Dunn, N. C. Organized January 13, 1904, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: E. Thomason Address: Charlotte, N. C, 

Secretary and Treasurer: W. C. Parker Address: New York, N. Y. 




Entire — North Caroling 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt -.. 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

•Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid _ 



58.97 
56.87 
63 
$ 1,350,000.00 



58.97 
56.87 
33H 
$ 1,349,700.00 



1,551,586.25 

196,492.45 

645,333.09 

383,438.86 

261,894.23 

623,842.43 

17,597.01 

7,270 

54,241.81 



1,564.528.37 

197,417.10 

566,127.94 

336,338.21 

229,789.73 

547,777.22 

14.978.67 

4.823 

52,561.03 



•Interest on bonds not included. 



East Carolina Railway Company 



181 



EAST CAROLINA RAILWAY COMPANY 

Road operated between Tarboro, N. C, and Hookerton, N. C. Organized July 1, 1893, under law 
of North Carolina. 

President: Henry Clark Bridgers Address: Tarboro, N. C. 
Secretary: A. D. Fowlkes Address: Tarboro, N. C. 

Treasurer: Henry Clark Bridgers Address: Tarboro, N. C. 





Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


.39.20 

38.20 

41 
$ 55,500.00 
$ 401,015.10 
$ 415,922.68 
$ 12,200.00 
$ 107,880.91 
$ 108,259.86 
$ 378. 95t 
$ 106,111.02 
157.23 




Road owned, miles. 




Number employees 




Capital stock 




Funded debt 




Cost of road 




Cost of equipment 




Operating revenue 




•Operating expenses 




Net operating revenue 




Total freight revenue 




Total passenger train service revenue 




Number revenue passengers 




Taxes paid . . 


$ 6,728.67 









•Interest on bonds not included. 



tin red. 



EAST CAROLINA RAILWAY 

Leased to and Operated by Henry Clark Bridgers of Tarboro, N. C. 
Road operated between Tarboro, N. C, and Hookerton, N. C. Organized July 1, 1898, under laws 



of North Carolina. 



President: 
Secretary: 



j\.ddress: 
jVddress: 



Treasurer: _ 


.. . Address: _ 












Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 






38.02 


Road owned, miles. 




38.02 


Number employees 




41 


Capital stock 




55,500.00 


Funded debt . . 




401,015.10 


Cost of road . . ... . . .. 




415.922.68 


Cost of equipment . . 




12,200.00 


Operating revenue _ . . 




72,469.02 


•Operating expenses 




85,453.09t 






12,984.071 






70,909.19 






79.16 


Number revenue passengers 






Taxes paid 




$ 


6,477.41 









•Interest on bonds not included. 

tincludea taxes, rents and interest except interest on bonds. 



Jin red. 



182 



IST. C. Corporation Commission 



East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad Company 

Road operated between Johnson City, Tenn., and Cranbarry, N. C. Organizsd May 2i, 1838, under 



Saws of Tennessee. Reorganized May 22, 1879. 
President: Edgar P. Earle 
Secretary: Hammond Prosser 
Treasurer and Vice-President J. E. Vance 



Address: Johnson City, Tenn. 
Address: Johnson City, Tenn. 
Address: Johnson City, Tean. 



Entire 



1930 



1931 



North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles.. 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

*Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue... 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



36.18 
36.18 
101 
490,800.00 
500,000.00 
1,115,873.59 
328,368.89 
217,780.18 
174,766.84 
43,013.34 
194,694.16 
14,652.61 
12.443 



36.18 
36.18 
88H 
490,800.00 
500,000.00 
1,118,350.14 
328,388.28 
230,664.87 
161,882.02 
68,782.85 
211,165.77 
10,576.58 
4,899 



3.18 
3.18 



43,136.41t 
43,945.00t 
98,074.121 
28,869.34t 
19,142.87t 
15,362.00t 

3,780. 87t 
17,113.611 

l,287.96t 



1,626.56 



3.18 
3.18 



43,136.41t 
43,945.00t 
98,291.79t 
28,862.05t 
20, 275. 44 t 
14,229.42t 
6,046.02t 
18,561.47t 
929. 68t 



1,499.70 



'Interest on bonds not included. 



tEstimated on mileage basis. 



GRAHAM COUNTY RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated between Robbinsville, N. C, and Topton, N. C. Organized February 27, 1905, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: H. C. Bemiss Address: Bradford, Pa. 
Secretary: L. W. Wilson Address: Robbinsville, N. C. 
Treasurer: L. C. Bemis Address: Robbinsville, N. C. 



Entire— North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles.. 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt... 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

•Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid. 



12.13 
12.13 
13 
225,000.00 



12.13 
12.13 
14 
225,000.00 



206,630.63 
24,751.66 
52,743.07 
40,801.92 
11,941.15 
51,018.07 



206,630.63 
24,751.66 
29,431.18 
27,997.77 
1,433.41 
28,390.18 



1,300.34 



1,508.02 



•Interest on bonds not included. 



High Point^ Thomasville and Denton Railroad Company 183 
High Point, Thomasville and Denton Railroad Company 

Road operated between High Point, N. C, and High Rock, N. C. Organized May 11, 1923, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: C. F. Tomlinson Address: High Point, N. C. 

Secretary and Treasurer: O.Arthur Kirkman Address: High Point, N. C. 




Entire— North Carolina 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

*Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



33.778 
33.778 
97 
218,090.00 



33.778 
33.778 
95 
$ 218,775.00 



485,767.25 
158,904.44 
363,028.40 
269,387.34 
93,641.06 
354,403.22 
8,625.18 

41 
2,821.30 



505,762.04 
159,519.92 
353,403.61 
233,496.11 
119,907.50 
348,506.11 

4,897.50t 
28 

6,004.29 



*Interest on bonds not included. 



tincluded in operating expenses. 



LAURINBURG AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated between Johns, N. C, and Raeford, N. C. Organized March 8, 1909, under laws of 
North CaroHna. 

President: James L. McNair Address: Laurinburg, N. C. 
Secretary: C. E, Beman Address: Laurinburg, N. C. 

Treasurer: Z. V. Pate Address: Laurinburg, N. C. 





Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


30 

30 

36 
S 225,000.00 
$ 75,000.00 
$ 357,048.67 
$ 52,459.44 
$ 116,151.33 
$ 98,745.03 
$ 17,406.30 
$ 110,576.62 
403.03 
853 
$ 5,660.85 


30 


Road owned, miles 


30 


Number employees . 


35 


Capital stock 


$ 225,000.00 
$ 75,000.00 
$ 357,996.68 
$ 52,459.44 
$ 112,582.62 
$ 95 197 29 


Funded debt 


Cost of road 


Cost of equipment 


Operating revenue 


•Operating expenses 


Net operating revenue 


$ 17,385.33 
$ 107,458.16 


Total freight revenue 


Total passenger train service and Highway Bus 


Number revenue passengers 




Taxes paid 


$ 5.426.84 





•^Interest on bonds not included. 



184 



N". C. Corporation Commission 



LAWNDALE RAILWAY AND INDUSTRIAL COMPANY 

Road operated between Lawndale, N. C, and Shelby, N. C. Organized January 10, 1888, under laws 
of North Carolina. 

President: John F. Schenck, Sr. Address: Lawndale, N. C. 
Secretary: John F. Schenck, Jr. Address: Shelby, N. C. 
Treasurer: John F. Schenck, Sr. Address: Lawndale, N C. 





Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


11.05 
9.28 
19 
$ 60,000.00 


11.05 




9.28 




17 


Capital stock 


$ 60,000.00 


Funded debt 




Cost of road 






Cost of equipment . . 


$ 78,447.07 
$ 21,195.50 
$ 18,976.67 
$ 2,218.67 
$ 21,195.50 


$ 78,447.07 


Operating revenue ._ . 


$ 14,918.55 




$ 12,913.12 




$ 2,505.43 


Total freight revenue . 


$ 14,918.55 






Number revenue passengers 






Taxes paid 


$ 426.93 


$ 440.44 







"Interest on bonds not included. 



LINVILLE RIVER RAILWAY COMPANY 



Road operated between Cranberry, N. C, and Pineola, N. C; Montezuma, N. C, and Boone, N. O. 
Organized August 29, 1899, under laws of North Carolina. 

President: Edgar P. Earlb Address: Johnson City, Tenn. 

Secretary and Treasurer: H. Prosser Address: Johnson City, Tenn. 




Entire — North Carolina 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road -.. 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

♦Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue .-. -. 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 



34.79 
34.79 
21 If 
$ 450.000.00 



522,655.85 
86,174.26 
57,301.34 
53,355.60 

3,945.74 
46,182.64 
10,567.66 

5,632 

4,979.23 



34.79 
34.79 
18 1[ 
$ 450,000.00 



523,351 56 
86,281.65 
65,029.97 
56,037.31 

8,992.66 
54,811.84 

9,626.44 

4,165 

4,672.46 



•Interest on bonds not included. 

^AU trainmen carried on report of East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad Company. 



Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company 



185 



LOUISVILLE AND NASHVILLE RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated in states of Ohio, Kentucky, North CaroHna, New York. California, and Texas 
Organized March 5, 1850, under laws of Kentucky. 

President: W. R. Cole Address: Louisville, Ky. 

Secretary: John M. Scott Address: Louisville, Ky. 
Treasurer: J. C. Michael Address: Louisville, Ky. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 




2,271.98 
4,999.79 
16,080 
$117,000,000.00 
$238,901,570.00 
$302,743,082.29 
$153,655,587.83 
$112,440,985.10 
$ 92,493,837.35 
$ 19,947,147.75 
$ 93,401.690.93 
$ 16.547,466.52 

4,556,815 
$ 6,233,951.36 


5,263.26 
4,507.16 

13,063 
$117,000,000.00 
$238,679,670.00 
$304,588,304.55 
$152,966,067.53 
$ 87,019,790.89 
$ 72,384,607.98 
$ 14.635,182.91 
$ 72.879.113.75 
$ 11.979,565.54 

3,008,217 
$ 5,485,518.21 


13.19 
13.19 


13.19 


Road owned, miles 


13.19 


Number employees 




Capital stock 


$ 308,646.00t 
$ 630,222.341 
1 798,636.25t 
$ 405,343.441 
$ 53,145.01 
$ 63,625.84 
$ 10,480.83 
$ 46,530.77 
$ 5,053.81 

12,191 
$ 8,874.57 


S 342, 342. cot 


Funded debt 


$ 698,376.71t 


Cost of road 


$ 891,225.38t 


Cost of equipment 


$ 447,578.71t 


Operating revenue 


5 31,318.24 


'Operating expenses 


$ 43,069.68 


Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue.. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 


$ 11,751.44 
$ 27,797.22 
$ 2,396.38 

8,049 
$ 7,941.83 



"Interest on bonds not included. 



tEstimated on mileage basis. 



MAXTON, ALMA AND SOUTH BOUND RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated between Alma. N. C. and Rowland, N. C. Organized May, 1911, under laws of North 
Carolina. 

President: H. A. McKinnon Address: Maxton, N. C. 
Secretary: C. J. Cottingham Address: Alma, N. C. 
Treasurer: A. J. McKinnon Address: Maxton, N. C. 





Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


15.15 
15.15 

161] 
$ 75,000.00 


15.15 


Road owned, miles 


15.15 


Number employees . .. ... 


161f 


Capital stock. . . ... 


$ 75,000.00 


Funded debt 




Cost of road 


$ 118,830.30 
$ 30,109.20 
$ 17,218.07 
$ 14,273.27 
$ 2,944.80 
$ 14,946.96 
$ 2,067.76 

651 
$ 184.62 


$ 118,365.05 


Cost of equipment. 


$ 29,159.20 


Operating revenue.. 


$ 15.264.41 


•Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue- 


$ 14,872.52 
$ 391.89 


Total freight revenue .... 


$ 13,154.09 


Total passenger train service revenue . 


$ 1,892.82 


Number revenue passengers. . . . . . 


279 


Taxes paid. 


$ 348.86 







'Interest on bonds not included. 

fFive of the General Officers serve without compensation. 



186 



T^. C. CoKPOKATioN Commission 



MOORE CENTRAL RAILWAY COMPANY 

Road operated between Cameron, N. C, and Carthage, N. C. Organized October 12, 1924, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: George R. Ross Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

Secretary and Treasurer: Arthur Ross Address: Asheboro, N. C. 





Entire — North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


10.107 
10.107 
18 
$ 75,000.00 


10.107 


Road owned, miles... 


10.107 


Number employees 


19 


.Capital stock .. 


$ 75,000.00 


Funded debt 




Cost of road .... .. 


$ 39,750.20 
$ 4,758.14 
$ 38,984.95 
$ 33,519.54 
$ 5,465.41 
$ 36,950.42 
$ 15.92 

57 
$ 574.72 


$ 39,750.20 




$ 4,758.14 


Operating revenue 


$ 26,500.72 


•Operating expenses 


$ 24,929.26 


Net operating revenue 


$ 1,571.46 


Total freight revenue 


$ 24,205.35 


Total passenger train service revenue 


$ 14.03 


Number revenue pa,ssengers 


56 


Taxes paid _ . . . . 


$ 508.06 







♦Interest on bonds not included. 



PIEDMONT AND NORTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 



Road operated in states of North Carolina and South Carolina. Organized November 17, 1913, under 
laws of South Carolina. 



President: W. S. Lee 

Secretary: J. C. McGowan 

Treasurer and Vice-President: N. A. Cocke 



Address: Charlotte, N. C. 
Address: Charlotte, N. C. 
Address: Charlotte, N. C. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 




176.56 
161.04 
472 
$ 8,584,600.00 
$ 6,276,700.00 


176.58 
161.03 
414 
$ 8,584,600.00 
$ 6,249,700.00 


46.32 
41.47 


46.55 




41.67 


Number employees 




Capital stock 


$ 2, 210,534. 50t 
$ 1,616,250.001 


$ 2,220,836.02t 


Funded debt 


1 lr616,797.39t 








$ 16,840,927.24 
$ 2,195,178.83 
$ 1,380,396.01 
$ 814,782.82 
$ 2,019,092.09 
$ 71,986,29 


$ 16,929,506.48 
$ 1,939,376.19 
$ 1,172,169.90 
$ 767,215.29 
$ 1,815,885.98 
$ 49,023.20 


$ 4,336,538. 76t 
$ 565,258.55! 
$ 355,451.97t 
$ 209,806.58 
$ 519,916.21t 
S 18,536.47t 


$ 4,319, 663. 26t 




$ 501,716.62t 




$ 303,238.02t 


Net operating revenue 


$ 198,478.60 


Total freight revenue 


$ 469,769.70t 


Total passenger train service revenue.. 
Number revenue passengers 


$ 12,682.30t 




$ 214,090.00 


$ 172,543.94 


$ 33,524.40 


$ 36,119.09 







*Interest on bonds not included. 



fEstimated on mileage basis. 



Pigeon River Railway Company 



187 



THE PIGEON RIVER RAILWAY COMPANY 

Road operated between West Canton, N. C, and Sunburst, N. C. Organized November 2, 1906, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: E. A. Oblinger Address: New York, N. Y. 

Secretary: J. F. Plank Address: New York, N. Y. 

Treasurer and Assistant Secretary: D. C. Williams Address: New York, N. Y. 



Entire — North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, m.iles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue ($404.71 non-operating revenue not in- 
cluded) 

*Operating expenses ($7,320.00 non-operating revenue ex- 
penses, included)- 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue... ._ 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 





11.87 




11.87 




14 


$ 


40,000.00 


$ 


77,000.00 


$ 


252,691.48 


$ 


5,000.00 


s 


18,264.35 


$ 


18,154.65 


$ 


109.70 


$ 


17,976.79 


$ 


206.76 




6.75 


$ 


707.40 



•'Intere t on bonds not included. 



RALEIGH AND CHARLESTON RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated between Marion, S. C, and Lumberton, N. C. Organized December 5, 1905, under 
laws of South Carolina. 

President: L. R. Powell, Jr. Address: Norfolk, Va. 

Treasurer and Assistant Secretary: T. W. Mathews Address: Norfolk, Va. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


42.58 

42.58 

53 
$ 574,500.00 
$ 550,000.00 
$ 1,110,278.07 
S 10,130.78 
$ 125,515.59 
$ 118,620.81 
$ 6,894.75 
$ 120,350.13 
$ 4,699.50 

3,051 




21.24 
21.24 




Road owned, miles 






Number employees 






Capital stock 




$ 286,560.00t 
$ 274,340.00t 
$ 553.806.70t 
$ 5,053.23t 
$ 62,607.17t 
$ 59,168.07t 
$ 3, 439. lot 
$ 60,030.64t 
$ 2, 344. lit 




Funded debt . 






Cost of road ... 






Cost of equipment ... 












•Operating expenses . 






Net operating revenue 






Total freight revenue . 






Total passenger train service revenue. 






Number revenue passengers 






Taxes paid . 




5 3,462.92 













*Interest on bonds not included. 



188 



N. C. CoRPOKATioN Commission 



RALEIGH AND CHARLESTON RAILROAD COMPANY 

L. R. Powell, Jr., and E. W. Smith, Receivers (See Note) 



Road operated between 

Receivers: 

Treasurer: 



and 

L. R. Powell, Jr. 
E. W. Smith 
T. W. Mathews 



Organized 



under laws of 



Address: Norfolk, Va. 
Address: Norfolk, Va. 
Address: Norfolk, Va. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 






42.58 

42.58 

39 
$ 574,500.00 
$ 550,000.00 
$ 1,110,114.77 
$ 10,130.78 
$ 87,509.47 
$ 63,273.14 
$ 24,236.33 
$ 82,954.37 
$ 4,369.83 

2,395 




21.24 








21.24 










Capital stock 






$ 286,560.00t 
$ 274,340.00t 
$ 553, 725. 24 t 
$ 5,056.73t 


Funded debt 






Cost of road . 






Cost of equipment -. 












S 43,649.72t 
$ 31,560.64t 
$ 12,089.08t 


















$ 41,377.64t 








S 2,179.67t 


Number revenue passengers 








Taxes paid 






$ 4.901.87 













♦Interest on bonds not included. 
Note. The property operated from January 1, 1931, to May 1, 1931, under name of Raleigh 
& Charleston Railroad Company and May 1, 1931, to December 31, 1931, under name of L. R. Powell, 
Jr., and E. W. Smith, as Receivers of Raleigh & Charleston Railroad Company. 



ROCKINGHAM RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated between Rockingham, N. C, and Gibson, N. C. Organized June 15, 1910, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: H. C. Wall Address: Rockingham, N. C. 

Secretary and Treasurer: J. LeGrand Everett Address: Rockingham, N. C. 



Entire — North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operati ng revenue 

♦Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Number revenue passengers. -. 

Taxes paid 





22.02 




22.02 




22.02 




22.02 




24 




24 




72,000.00 




72,000.00 




250,000.00 




250,000.00 




327,901.61 




308,317.56 




18,863.04 




18,863.04 




56,307.29 




52,954.28 




45,805.27 




44,499.99 




10,502.02 




8,454.29 




54,716.42 




51,716.09 




105.94 




122.04 




210 




222 


$ 


4,035.13 


S 


2,825.26 



"Interest on bonds not included. 



Tennessee and N. C. Railway Company 



189 



TENNESSEE & NORTH CAROLINA RAILWAY COMPANY 



Road operated between Newport, Tenn., and Crestmont, N. C; Andrews, N. C, and Hayesville, 

N. C; Knoxville, Tenn., and Sevierville, Tenn. Organized June 28, 1920, under laws of Tennessee. 

General Manager and President: C. Boicb Address: Newport, Tenn. 

Secretary: F. W. Morehead Address: Hartford, Tenn. 

Treasurer and Vice-President: J. W. Bell Address: Abington, Va. 





Entire 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 


74.59 
74.59 
67 
$ 250,000.00 


73.74 
73.74 
55 
$ 250,000.00 


26.84 
26.84 


26.84 
26.84 


$ 90.975.00 


$ 90,975.00 


Funded debt 




Cost of road 


$ 462,845.11 

$ 45,258.92 


J 462,845.11 
$ 45,258.92 


I 168,429.33 
$ 116,469.72 
$ 20,967.97 
S .34,121.37 
$ 13,153.49t 
S 20,773.58 
$ 387.57 

3,230 
$ 1,688.98 


I 168,429.33 




S 16,469.72 


Operating revenue 


$ 11,694.13 


'Operating expenses 






$ 21,092.88 


Net operating revenue 






5 9,483.75t 


Total freight revenue 






$ 11,465.63 


Total passenger train service revenue 






$ 98.60 


Number revenue passengers 






806 


Taxes paid 






$ 1,524.88 











*Interest on bonds not included. 



tin red. 



THE TOWNSVILLE RAILROAD COMPANY 



Road operated between Townsville, N. C, and Manson, N. C. Organized July 2, 1919, under laws 
of North Caroling. 

President: J. R. Paschal Address: Wise, N. C. 

Secretary and Treasurer: R. B. Taylor Address: Townsville, N. C. 





Entire — North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


10.806 
10.806 
11 
$ 240,000.00 
$ 22,500.00 
$ 161,799.62 
$ 15,887.27 
$ 12,084.99 
$ 13,173.71 
$ l,088.72t 
$ 12,064.99 


10.806 


Road owned, miles 


10.806 


Number employees. . _ 


12 


Capital stock.- .. 


$ 240,000.00 


Funded debt. 


$ 22,500.00 


Cost of road 


$ 161,799.62 


Cost of equipm^ent. . 


$ 15,887.27 
$ 8,606.29 


Operating revenue ._ 


♦Operating expenses . 


$ 8,321.29 


Net operating revenue 


$ 285.00 


Total freight revenue... . 


$ 8,572.29 


Total passenger train service revenue 




Number revenue passengers ... 






Taxes paid 


$ 628.78 


$ 512.48 







•Interest on bonds not included, 
tin red. 



190 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



TUCKASEEGEE AND SOUTHEASTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

Road operated between East La Porte, N. C, and Sylva, N. C. Organized June 7, 1922, under laws 
of North Carolina. 

President: Joseph Key% Address: Washington, D. C. 

Secretary and Treasurer: N. M. Davison Address: East La Porte, N. C. 



Entire — North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Number employees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

*Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue... 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue. 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid- 





12.26 




12.26 




12.26 




12.26 




27 




18 




300,000.00 


1 


240,000.00 




5,000.00 








348,207.27 




348,207.27 




36,562.87 




37,162.87 




69,727.68 




38,599.04 




80,768.20 




49,785.49 




11,040.52J 




11,186.45$ 




69,727.68 




38,599.04 



*Interest on bonds not included. 
|In red. 



VIRGINIA AND CAROLINA SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated between Lumberton, N. C, and Hope Mills, N. C; St. Paul, N. C, and Elizabeth- 
town, N. C. Organized January 11, 1907, under laws of North Carolina. 

President and Treasurer: A. T. McLean Address: Lumberton, N. C. 

Secretary and First Vice President: H. B. Jennings Address: Lumberton, N. C. 



Entire— North Carolina 



1930 



1931 



Road operated, miles 

Road owned, miles 

Num ber em ployees 

Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

•Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Number revenue passengers 

Taxes paid 





52.96 




52.96 




52.96 




52.96 




62 




45 




141,000.00 




141,000.00 




524,000.00 




524,000.00 




695,000.00 




688,535.00 




72,081.00 




72,748.00 




150,674.00 




114,243.00 




130,709.00 




91,066.00 




19,965.00 




23,177.00 




136,967.00 




103,695.00 




10,657.00 




9,279.00 




5,475 




2,713 


$ 


10,220.00 


$ 


11,365.00 



*Interest on bonds not included. 



Warrenton Railroad Company 



191 



WARRENTON RAILROAD COMPANY 

Road operated between Warrenton, N. C, and Warren Plains, N. C. Organized April 21, 1876, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President and General Manager: J. M. Gardner Address: Warrenton, N. C. 
Secretary and Treasurer: C. R. Rodwell Address: Warrenton, N. C. 





Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


■ ■ 

3.00 
3.00 
11 

$ 66,000.00 


3.00 


Road owned, miles 


3.00 


Number employees 


11 


Capital stock 


$ 66,000.00 


Funded debt 




Cost of road 


$ 54,564.04 
$ 13,465.52 
$ 41,911.56 
$ 30,715.32 
$ 11,196.24 
$ 40,853.87 
$ 1,057.69 


$ 54,558.04 


Cost of equipment 


$ 13,465.52 


Operating revenue 


$ 39,488.07 


•Operating expenses 


$ 24,800.44 


Net operating revenue 


$ 14,687.63 


Total freight revenue 


$ 38,550.07 


Total special train service revenue 


$ 709.35 






Taxes paid 


$ 2,406.24 


$ 2,806.07 







*Interest on bonds not included. 



WASHINGTON AND VANDEMERE RAILROAD COMPANY 

(Operated as an Integral Part of A. C. L. R. R. Co., Lessee) 

Road operated between Washington, N. C, and Vandemere, N. C. Organized March 4, 1903, under 
laws of North Carolina. 

President: A C. McLean Address: Washington, N, C. 
Secretary: R. D. Cronly Address: Wilmington, N. C. 
Treasurer: P. Nichols Address: Wilmington, N. C. 





Entire— North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles 


40.52 
40.52 
8 
$ 125,000.00 
$ 720,000.00 
$ 599,897.96 
$ 37,606.60 


39.59 


Road owned, miles 


39.59 


Number employees . 


9 


Capital stock . 


$ 125,000.00 


Funded debt 


$ 720 000.00 


Cost of road 


$ 599,897.96 


Cost of equipment 


S 36,845.60 


Operating revenue . 




•Operating expenses 












Total freight revenue 












Number revenue passengers 






Taxes paid . 













*Interest on bonds not included. 



192 



N. C. CoKPORATioN Commission 



Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern Railroad Company 

Road operated between Navassa, N. C, and Southport, N. C. Organizad January 22, 1937, under 
laws of North Carolina. 



President: M. J. Corbett 
Secretary: Walker Taylor 
Treasurer: John D. Corbett 



Address: Wilmington, N. C. 
Address: Wilmington, N. C. 
Address: Wilmington, N. C. 





Entire — North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


Road operated, miles . . . 


30.2 

30.2 

26 
$ 165,000.00 
$ 183,750.00 
1 464,049.31 
$ 23,851.31 
$ 35,984.05 
$ 35,923.63 
$ 60.42 
$ 25,036.86 
$ 9,804.64 

1,839 
$ 2,518.89 


30.2 


Road owned, miles 


30.2 




24 


Capital stock... ... 


S 165,000.00 


Funded debt 


$ 183,750.00 


Cost of road . 


$ 464,040.31 


Cost of equipment 


$ 27,498.61 


Operating revenue 


1 27,722.08 


*Operating expenses . . 


$ 28,044.30 


Net operating revenue - . 


$ 322. 22 J 


Total freight revenue . . . 


$ 18,016.59 




$ 7,193.57 




1,954 


Taxes paid... 


$ 910.42 







*Intere8t on bonds not included. 
}In red. 



Recapitulation 



193 



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240,436.45 




402,000.00 



801,000.00 
918,251.60 

372,306.90 

615,000.00 

5.000,000.00 


ri4 

3 
1 


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iiiisiiii 


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11,042 

986 

13,770 

1,797 


9,605 
15.549 
27,209 




^§lg§s 




248 

4,000 

50 

924 

638 

31 

79 

625 

1,245 


Cost of Road 
and Equip- 
ment 


s^ 


^^^S 


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29,896 
2,876 

29,307 
2,110 


27,088 
44,324 
72,733 




CO 




685 

4,944 

50 

1,722 

2,371 

79 

414 

1,376 

6,741 


Miles of 
Road 
Owned 


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6 


Carolina, CHnchfield & Ohio Ry 

Carolina and Northwestern Ry 

Norfolk Southern R. R 

Atlantic and North Carolina R. R 

Durham and South CaroHna R. R. 

Norfolk and Western Ry 

Seaboard Air Line Ry 

Southern Railway 

Southern Railway Subsidiaries: 


Asheville and Craggy Mountain Ry 

Asheville Southern Ry 

Atlanta and Charlotte Air Line Ry 

Atlantic and Danville Ry 

Carohna and Tennessee Southern Ry. . 

Danville and Western Ry 

High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and 


Southern R. R 

North CaroHna R. R 

North and South CaroHna R. R 

North CaroHna Midland R. R 

Southern Railway .-CaroHna Division. . 

State University R. R 

Tallulah Falls Ry 

Yadkin R. R 

Winston-Salem Southbound Ry.. 



Recapitulation 



197 



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'N. C. Corporation Commission 





Total 

- Passenger 

Train 

Service 


$ (6) 
7,193.57 




^ 






I 


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oo 


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00 




■II 
II 


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15 


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183,750.00 


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$ 125,000.00 
165,000.00 


So 


Cost of Road 
and Equip- 
ment 


$ 636,743.56 
. 491,538.92 


§ 

(M 

•<*< 




Miles of 

Road 

Owned 

Operated 


05 O 

oo CO 


i 

28 




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Railway Express Agency^ Incorporated 



199 



RAILWAY EXPRESS AGENCY, INCORPORATED 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Address 


President 


Robt. E. M. Cowie 


New York, N. Y. 


Secretary . . _ ._ . 


E. R. Merry, Jr 


New York, N. Y. 


Vice-President and Treasurer 


W.B.Clark 


New York, N. Y. 









HISTORY 

Incorporated December 7, 1928, under Laws of Delaware. 

MIIiEAOE 





Entire System 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 


Steam Lines 


$220,945.75 

2,665.58 

26,061.77 

2,733.69 

36.25 

13,361.00 

150.15 


$218,713.12 

2,535.57 

25,971.25 

3,600.85 

35.50 

10,443.00 

275.22 


$3,031.32 
26.69 


$2,995.58 


Electric Lines 


26.65 


Steamboat Lines 




Stage Lines 






Ferries 






Aircraft Lines 






Gas Motors — Rail Lines 












Total ... - 


$265,954.19 


$261,574.51 


$3,058.01 


$3,022.23 







OPERATING REVENUES 




Account 


1930 


1931 


Tkansportation: 
Express — domestic 


$237,465,751.11 
22,554.56 


$191,976,078.00 




67.871.24 




Total transportation . ._. ... _ 


$237,488,305.67 
$112,365,946.79 


$192,043,949.24 
81,220,724.97 


CoNTR.\CT Payments: 
Express privileges — Dr. . 




Revenue from transportation _ .. . 


$125,122,358.88 


$110,823,224.27 






Operations other than Transportation: 
Custom brokerage fees... 


$ 208,225.81 

5,658.38 

120,691.66 

2,140,120.69 

199.55 

872,341.45 


$ 165 689.38 


Order and commission . 


5,279.a3 
108,557.79 


Rents of buildings and other property. . 


C. 0. D. Checks.. 


1,819,682.41 
37,98 


Profit on exchange and other financial revenue 


Miscellaneous . ... 


1,079,211.82 




Total operating revenues 


$128,469,596.42 


$113,996,682.98 







200 



]N". C. Corporation Commission 

OPERATING EXPENSES 



Account 


1930 


1931 


Maintenance 


$ 8,028,889.54 

424,374.10 

110,303,698.75 

7,063,790.97 


$ 7,516,885.61 
403,433.88 


Traffic 


Transportation _ _ 


96,582,231.30 




6,678,389.25 








$125,820,7»3.36 


$111,180,940.04 







BALANCE SHEET 



Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1930 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1930 


Investments _. . 


$52,135,571.38 

24,155,504.56 

140,107.10 

1,289,786.53 


Capital Stock 


$ 100,000,00 






20,127,799.58 






140,940.35 






24,552,229.64 










Total 




Total 


$77,720,969.57 


$77,720,969.57 









Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1931 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1931 


Investment _ 


$51,515,254.94 

21,5127,395.68 

34,269.25 

1,181,191.48 


Capital Stock 


$ 100,000.00 


Current assets 


Current liabilities 


15,711,098.69 


Deferred assets 


Deferred liabilities 


34,269.25 


Unadjusted debits 


Unadjusted credits 


25,612,743.41 










Total ........ 




Total 


$74,258,111.35 


$74,258,111.35 











EQUIPMENT OWNED 






1930 


1931 




$32,204,180.20 


$31,532,736.99 







Southeastern Express Company 
SOUTHEASTERN EXPRESS COMPANY 



201 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Address 


President 


J. E. Skaggs - - 


Atlanta, Ga. 




F. W. Woods — - -- 


Atlanta, Ga. 









Organized 1920, under Laws of Alabama. 



HISTORY 



MILEAGE 





Entire System 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 




$9,912.43 

37.72 

268.00 

26.00 


$9,881.90 

37.72 

268.00 

26.00 


$1,471.57 


$1,471.57 
























Total 


$10,244.15. 


$10,213.62 


$1,471.57 


$1,471.57 







OPERATING REVENUES 






Account 


1930 


1931 


Tkanspoktation : 
Express — domestic _ . 


$6,755,044.66 
8,510.34 


$5 597,321 26 


Miscellaneous 


5,675 88 






Total transportation _ __ 


$6,763,555.00 


$5,602 997.14 






Contract Payments: 
Express privileges— Dr 


$2,940,458.65 


$2,116,831.25 




Revenue from transportation 


$3,823,096.35 


$3,486,165.89 






Operations Other Than Transportation: 
Customs brokerage fees 


$ 


77.97 

3.73 

1,270.98 

13,506.27 

89,752.94 

7,978.77 


$ 50 81 


Order and commission 




Rents of buildings and other property 


868 73 


Money orders 


15,699.02 

76,209.89 

6,095.39 


C. 0. D. checks ... 


Miscellaneous 




Total operating revenue _ 


$ 


3,935,687.01 


$ 3,585,089.73 





202 



]^. C. Corporation Commission 

OPERATING EXPENSES 



Account 


1930 


1931 


Maintenance ._.... . 


$ 


172,981.42 

93,686.05 

3,270,210.56 

265,576.92 


$ 


169,629.37 
93,125 42 


Traffic 


Transportation 


2,929,650.96 
251,044.11 


General . 




Total operating expenses . 


$ 


3,802,454.95 


$ 


3,443,449.86 





BALANCE SHEET 



Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1930 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1930 


Investment 


$ 1,200,879.05 

1,391,375.85 

41,342.14 


Capital stock 


$ 1 000 000 00 


Current assets 


Current liabilities 


730,520 51 


Unadjusted debits — 


Unadjusted credits 


771,857,17 




Corporate surplus 


131,219.36 




Total 




Total - 


$ 2,633,597.04 


$ 2,633,597.04 








Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1931 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1931 




$ 1,623,038.30 

955,679.51 

17,603.08 




$ 1,000,000.00 






625,690.33 


Unadjusted debits 




839,411.20 






131,219.36 




Total 




Total 


$ 2,596,320.89 


$ 2,596,320.89 











EQUIPMENT OWNED 










1930 


1931 


Ectuipment owned 


$ 


995,143.63 


$ 


998,327.19 







The Pullman Company 



203 



THE PULLMAN COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




D, A. Crawford 


Chicago, 111. 




J. F. Kane 


Chicago, 111. 




H. A. Brown -. 


Chicago, 111. 




G. A. Kelly 


Chicago, 111. 






Chicago, 111. 









PROPERTY OPERATED 



1931 



Total length of main lines of railroads over which its cars run 

(miles) 

Mileage in North Carolina 



130,995 
1,867.23 



130,995 
1,867.23 



CAPITAL STOCK 




1930 


1931 


Capital stock 


$ 120,150,000.00 


$ 120,150,000.00 







POSTAL TELEGRAPH CABLE COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Address 


President 


C. H. Mackay 


New York N Y. 


Secretary 


W. B. Dunn 


New York N. Y. 


Treasurer 


J J. Cardona 


New York N. Y. 









RECEIPTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 





1930 


1931 


Commercial telegraph tolls, interstate 


$ 258,522.26 

52,422.69 

843.41 

681.37 

5,833.87 

9,434.30 

4,638.10 

5,398.41 

562.07 

3,254.12 


$ 230,013.88 




57,832.31 
222.75 




Government telegraph tolls, intrastate 


334.44 


Press telegraph tolls, interstate . 


4,010,50 


Press telegraph tolls, intrastate . ... 


8,678.77 


Stock and Commercial News . 


4,268.07 


Money transfer tolls, interstate 


4,180.22 


Money transfer tolls, intrastate 


466.53 


Money transfer premiums, interstate 


2,800.99 



204 



'N. C. Corporation Commission 





1930 


1931 




S 338.81 
7,353.84 
2,670.85 
14,001.56 
12,610.43 
2,430.14 


$ 312.61 




7,451.81 




3,155.83 


Telephone receipts, interstate 


9,867.08 
9,312 75 


Telephone receipts, intrastate 


Rents from other operated property 


2,260.85 


Rents from leased wires 






60.11 


77.27 




6.49 






143.97 






103.97 


Other non-transmission revenues 


368.76 
8,948.53 
2,031.26 


599.91 


Telephone transmission tolls, interstate (Dr.) 


12,275.86 


Telephone transmission tolls, intrastate (Dr.) 


3,360.18 








$ 370,445.31 


1 330,464.96 







EXPENSES IN NORTH CAROLINA 



1930 



1931 



Supervision of maintenance 

Repairs of office equipment 

Repairs of aerial plant 

Repairs of underground plant 

Repairs of buildings and grounds 

Testing and regulating 

Minor rents for property 

Depreciation of plant and equipment 

Other maintenance expenses 

Supervision of operations 

Operators 

Telegraph and cable office clerks 

Messenger service expenses 

Operating power .. 

Rents of telegraph and cable offices 

Telegraph and cable office stationery and printing. 

Operators' schoohng 

Rest and lunch roonvs 

Miscellaneous telegraph and cable office expenses.. 

Obtaining Stock and Commercial News 

Telephone Company service 

Commissions 

Advertising and soliciting 

Traffic damages 

Other conducting operations expenses 

Salaries of general officers 

Salaries of general office clerks 

Expenses of general officers and clerks 

General stationery and printing 

Other general office supplies and expenses 

General law expense 

Insurance 

Accidents and damages 

Law expenses connected with damages 



2,253.85 

8,000.77 

29,650.47 

509.10 

20.72 

265.65 

8,729.72 



38,081.64 
110,302.64 
29,220.75 
41,291.40 

2,991.28 
47,031.14 
11,342.99 

1,192.10 



15,504.85 
144.11 
650.92 
317.59 

3,652.68 

1,042.75 
496.14 
368.15 

2,502.16 
225.52 
124.43 

1,090.37 
453.94 
928.16 
491.55 
209.32 



1,467.90 

6,606.35 

13,156.41 

654.43 

5.60 

9,947.14 

10,952.46 

11,474.26 

.13 

25,163.96 

84,556.36 

29,341.78 

37,174.32 

1.983.80 

41,755.84 

8,096.96 

952.19 

128.18 

13,724.32 

140.31 

820.06 

655.54 

12,431.54 

995.21 

567.52 

532.05 

1,809.25 

221.37 

145.26 

847.69 

240.95 

1,258.82 

199.08 

147.67 



Western Union Telegraph Company 



205 



1930 



1931 



Relief department and pensions 

Miscellaneous rents 

Valuation expenses 

Amortization of franchises and patents. 

Other general expenses 

Taxes assignable to operations 

Miscellaneous rents 

Other interest deductions 



Grand total. 



7,306.72 

5,231.55 

260.65 



22.86 
4.930.33 



376,838.97 



5,314.68 



217.25 

18.30 

66.73 

6,972.47 

5,127.38 

23,307.52 

359,061.59 



WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY 

Organized April 1851, under Laws of New York 
PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Address 


President _ . . . 


Newcomb Carlton 


New York, N. Y. 


Secretary and Vice-President - 


Lewis McKisick 

G. K. Huntington . . . 


New York, N. Y. 


Treasurer 


New York, N. Y. 









PROPERTY OPERATED 





Entire System 


North Carolina 




1930 


1931 


1930 


1931 


Number of telegraph offices 


21,298 

217,458 

1,598,818 

39.088 
350,120 


23,490 

219,298 

1,525,797 

39,354 
387,688 


495 

4.243 

30,507 

21 

1,315 


462 


Miles of pole lines . 


4,228 


Miles of open wire . 


30,549 


Miles of cable 


17 




1,312 







CAPITAL STOCK 





1930 


1931 


Capital stock . _ . _ . 


$ 102.381,177.91 

331,916,808.63 

388,856.131.47 

95,692,696.79 

130,581,857.98 


$ 104.527,999.16 


Plant, equipment and real estate 


333.299,585.11 


Total assets 


378.845.562.26 


Surplus _ 


93.333.051.46 


Gross operating revenues.. 


108,736,948.85 







206 



JST. C. Corporation Commission 

RECEIPTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 





1930 


1931 


Intrastate: 
Commercial telegraph tolls 


$ 330,916.19 

744.56 

21,280.18 

9,002.11 

19,071.26 

7,259.76 


$ 296,050.21 
950 66 


Government telegraph tolls - 


Press telegraph tolls .-. . -.. _-.. ... 


13,561.00 
9,565.33 

15,450.08 
7,225.30 


Messenger service revenues _. . .-. 


Money transfer premiums and tolls ._ ._ .. . .. 


Miscellaneous revenues . .- ., _-. ... .. . _ . 




Total 


$ 388,274.06 

$ 1,043,891.04 
2,327.43 
16,531.31 
60,977.17 
101,335.35 
19,432.61 
24,033.76 


$ 342,802.58 

S 900,875.79 
2,863.03 
13,520.48 
49,411.89 
93,442.24 
18 527 07 


Interstate: 


Government telegraph tolls .. . . . . 


Press telegraph tolls 


Money transfer premiums and tolls 


Stock and Commercial News revenues 


Time service revenues 


Miscellaneous revenues 


30,155 44 






Total --- - -- -._..---.- 


$ 1,268,528.67 


$ 1,108,795.94 






Grand total 


$ 1,656,802.73 


1 1,451,598.52 





EXPENSES IN NORTH CAROLINA 








1930 


1931 




$ 


1,177,144.79 
440,801.83 
82,980.07 
22,134.77 


$ 


1,016,565.84 




411,022.70 


General expenses 


84,171.67 


Taxes 


52,076.10 








Total 


$ 


1,723,061.46 


S 


1,563,836.31 







GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHT AND POWER 
COMPANIES 



ASHEVILLE GAS COMPANY 



Incorporated October 15, 1929, under the laws of Delaware, 

Main Office: Asheville, N. C. 

Officers: (1930-31) President, A. E. Pierce, Chicago; Vice Presidents, W . H . Wildes and D. C. McClvire 
Chicago; Secretary, W. M. McFarland, Chicago; Treasurer, W, S. McCullough, Chicago. 

Gas plant operated at Asheville, N. C. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1930 



Assets 



Balance 

December 31, 

1930 



Liabilities 



Balance 
December 31, 



Fixed Capital. 
Change 



Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change 

Interest and Dividends Received _ 
Change 



$ 1,366,899.61 
64,433.00 



6,396.13 
12,070.56 
28,205.11 
28,776.39' 



Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change . 

Prepayments 

Change 



Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Change 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Change 



250.00' 



21,386.88 

928.48 

4,104.34 

3,838.28 



119,436.62 

119,436.62 

814.92 

1,626.30^ 



Total... 
Change. 



1.547,234.61 
145,873.70 



Capital Stock. 
Change 



$ 1,368,500.00 



Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Change 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits. . 
Change 



Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

MisceMfeneous Accrued Liabilities 

Change 

Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change 



Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Contributions to Extensions- 
Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Profit and Loss .. 

Change 



65,000.00 
65,000.00 
15,622.74 
6,971.15* 
5,725.66 
3,860.16 



1,170.00 

1,582.59* 

1,405.82 

1,389.22 

230.32 

73.05 

67,718.35 

67,718.35 



136,707.94 

135,132.48 

241.35 

241.35 

2,565.40 

1,343.20 

117,643.97* 

117,643.97* 



TotaL.. 
Change. 



$ 1,547,243.61 
145,873.70 



208 



N. C. Corporation Commission- 
balance SHEET — 1931 



Assets 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Fixed Capital 

Change 

Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Prepayments 

Change 

Miscellaneous Assets: 

Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Change 

Clearing and Apportionment Ac- 
counts 

Change— 

Work in Progress 

Change 



Total _-. 
Change . 



1,379,774.48 
12,874.87 



4,693.65 

1,702.48J 

29,436.97 

1,231.86 



23,392.37 
2,005.49 
6,327.74 
2,223.40 



71,135.26 
48,301.361 



801.40 

13.521 

9,718.52 

9,718.52 



$ 1,525,280.39 
21,963.2^ 



Capital Stock 

Change 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities 

Change 

Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Contribution to Extensions 

Change 

Contingency Reserve 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Loss 

Change 

Total 

Change 



1,368,500.00 

65,000.00t 

7,023.29 

8,599.45t 

6,293.87 

.568.21 



1,586.50 
416.50 
440.20 
965.62* 



230.32* 
67,000.00 
718.35' 



140,897.22 

4,189.28 

305.15 

63.80 

1,140.00 

1,140.00 

4,270.71 

1,705.31 

72,176.551 

45,467.42 



1,525,280.39 
21,963.22* 



tin Red. 

*Increase. 





OPERATING REVENUE AND 


EXPENSES 








1930 


1931 


Operating Revenue 


$ 146,626.58 
88,116.03 


S 


141,074.23 


Operating Expenses* 


78,487.47 







•Exclusive of taxes and depreciation. 



Caldwell Power Company 
statistics 



209 



1930 



1931 



Coal gas benches, number 

Coal gas benches, capacity (M.C.F.). 

Coal gas manufactured (M.C.F.) 

Sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 

Gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Coal carbonized, tons 

Average cost coal, per ton 

Coke produced, tons - 

Average value coke, per ton 

Tar produced, gallons 

Average value tar, costs 

Miles mains 

Customers, number 



100,154.6 

91,266.5 

136.4 

8,738.9 

8,342 

4.44 

5,422 

5.50 

83,420 



66.78 
2,661 



480 

103,664.5 

91,949 

164.4 

11,551.1 

8,131.15 

4.325 

5,082.14 

5.50 

100,460 

4 

67.35 

2.675 



CALDWELL POWER COMPANY 

Incorporated July 28, 1921, under the Laws of North Carolina. 

Main office: Lenoir, N. C. 

Officers (1930-31): President, E. C. Marshall, Charlotte, Vice President, R. L. Peterman, Charlotte, 
Secretary-Treasurer, D. G. Calder, Charlotte. 

TOWNS AND CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTEICITY 

Retail: Lenoir, Granite Falls. 



OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 



s 


1930 


1931 




$ 284,919.65 
213,833.66 


$ 


303,695.08 




227,409.20 






•Exclusive of taxes, etc. 

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES— 1930 



Assets 



Balance 
December 31, 



Liabilities 



Balance ^ 

December 31, 

1930 



Investment in Plant and Property 
Current Miscellaneous Assets 



$ 308,591.37 
167,119.73 



Total. 



$ 475,711.10 



Capital Stock Outstanding 

Current Miscellaneous Liabilities. 

Total 



$ 200,000.00 
275,711.10 



$ 475,711.10 



14 



210 



]S[. G. CoRPOKATiON Commission 

BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



Assets 


Balance 

December 31, 

1931 


Liabilities 


Balance 

December 31, 

1931 


Fixed Capital 


$ 34,327.55 

13,926.14 

140,000.00 

75,508.39 

5,181.69 
519.71 


Capital Stock 


$ 200,000 00 


Current Assets: 

Cash -- -- 


Current Liabilities: 
Accounts Payable 


16 018 60 






4 349 39 




Accrued Liabilities: 




Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 


9,561.24 


penses: 
Material and Supplies - 


Reserves: 
Retirement Reserve 




Prepayments 


92 193 88 




Contribution to Extensions 

Profit and Loss-Surplus 


1,500.00 
225,840 37 




Total - . . .- 




Total -.-.-- . 


$ 549,463.48 


$ 549,463.48 







STATISTICS 





1930 


1931 


Current generated . '.J . .-. . . 








17,167,000 
17,167,000 

14,968,250 

12,401 

2,186,349 


18,237,000 
18,237,000 

16,140,628 

16,880 

2 079 492 




Current sold 

Current used by com,pany 

Current unaccounted for 






Total 


17,167,000 
1,425 


18,237,000 











CAROLINA CENTRAL GAS COMPANY 

Incorporated January 6, 1930, under the laws of North Carolina, 
Main office: Hendersonville, N. C. 

Officers (1930-31): President, Byron T. Gifford, Chicago; Secretary, J. H. Wendel, Chicago; Treas- 
urer, E. H. Reed, Chicago; General Manager, R. P. Freeze, Hendersonville, N. C. 
Gas plant operated at Hendersonville, N . C. 

OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 



1930 



1931 



Operating revenue 

*Operating expenses 

Merchandise and jobbing revenue, net 

♦Exclusive of taxes, etc. 



7,7.17.89 
7,837.25 
3,263.52 



$ 11,020.57 

8,297.02 

(less) 72.35 



CAROLiisrA Central Gas Company 

STATISTICS 



211 



1930 



1931 



Water gas sets, number 

Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.) 

Holder capacity (M. C. F.) 

Gas produced (M.C.F.) - 

Sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 

Used by the company (M.C.F.) .. 

Unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Oil used, gallons 

Cost of oil, gallon (cents) 

Mains, miles of ., 

Customers, number 



1 


1 


360 


360 


33 


33 


6,162.7 


6,898.8 


4,426.2 


5,974.5 


1,515.8 


393.1 


190.7 


531.2 


32,796 


36,387 


5.5 


8.5 


22.5 


23 


239 


194 



BALANCE SHEET — 1930 



Balance 
December 31, 



Liabilities 



Balance 
December 31. 



Fixed Capital 

Current Assets: 

Cash - 

Notes Receivable 

Accounts Receivable 

Unbilled Service 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Prepayments 

Miscellaneous Current Assets 

Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Miscellaneous Suspense 



Total . 



11,112.50 


188.89 


82.50 


11,215.70 


50.00 



,075.94 
671.45 
360.00 



8,917.24 
1,289.19 



$ 139,963.41 



Capital Stock 

Long Term Debt 

Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Accounts Payable 

Consumers' Deposits. 

Dividends Declared 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued. . 

Interest Accrued 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities 
Advances to Affiliated Companies 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Miscellaneous Unadjusted 

Credits— 

Profit-Surplus 

Total 



S 43,500.00 
60,000.00 



1,692.09 

11,633.69 

625.00 

3.29 



294.00 

950.76 

1,030.37 

17,954.71 



1,060.43 
158.77 



625.33 
434.94 



$ 139,963.41 



212 



N. C. COKPORATION CoMMISSIOIir 
BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



Assets 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Fixed Capital 

Change 

Current Assets: 

Cash -- 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change. 

Accounts Receivable 

Change... 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex 

PENSES: 

Material and Supplies .-. 

Change 

Prepayments.. 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Assets 

Change 

Miscellaneous Assets: 

Special Deposits 

Change 

Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Change 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Change 



118,125.07 
7,012.57 



110.57 

78.32- 

432.91 

350.41 

4,948.08 

6,317.62- 



6,072.08 

3.86' 

352.66 

318.79- 

90.00 

270.00- 



325.20 
325.20 



9,075.04 
157.80 

1,595.22 
306.03 



Total... 
Change . 



$ 141,126.83 
1,163.42 



Capital Stock 

Change 

Capital Stock Subscribed. 

Change 

Long Term Debt 



Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits... 

Change 

Dividends Declared — 
Change 



Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities 

Change 

Advances to AffiHated Companies 
Change 



Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Miscellaneous Unadjusted Credits 

Change 

Profit and Loss-Surplus 

Change 



42,900.00 

200.00* 

100.00 

300.00* 

60,000.00 



1,692.09 
9,876.97 
1,756.72* 
343.40 
281.60* 



3.29* 



399.35 

105.35 

1,049.48 

98.70 

1,144.22 

113.85 

19,802.91 

1.848.20 



2,969.39 
1,908.96 
25.01 
133.76* 
571.84 
53.49* 
252.19 
182.78* 



Total... 
Change. 



141,126.83 
1,163.42 



*Decrease. 



Carolina Power and Light Company 



213 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Incorporated April 6, 1926, under general laws of North Carolina. 

Main office: 5 West Hargett Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

Officers: (1930-31) President, B. S. Jerman, Raleigh; Vice President, P. A. Tillery, Raleigh; Secretary 
E. P. Summerson, New York; Treasurer, A. C. Ray, New York; Assistant Secretary and Treasurer ^ 
C. J. Curry, Raleigh. 

TOWNS AND CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTRICITY, RETAIL 

(1930): North Carohna: Aberdeen, Alma, Angier, Ansonville, Arden, Asheboro, Asheville, Auburn, 
Autryville, Bahama, Bald Creek, Balsam, Barnardsville, Biscoe, Black Mountain, Bladenboro, Bonlee, 
Bonsall, Brickton, Broadway, Buie's Creek, Bunn, Bynum, Cameron, Candler, Candor, Canton, Car- 
penter, Carthage, Cary, Castalia, Clinton, Clyde, Coats, Craggy, Democrat, Dunn, Ellerbe, Enka,. 
Ether, Eureka, Fairmont, Fairview, Falcon, Fletcher, Four Oaks, Franklinton, FrankHnville, Fuquay 
Springs, Garner, Gibson, Godwin, Goldsboro, Goldston, Gulf, Hamlet, Haywood, Hazelwood, Helena, 
Hemp, Henderson, Hoffman, Holly Springs, Hope Mills, Hot Springs, Inanda, Jackson Springs, Jones- 
boro, Jupiter, Kenly, Kittrell, Knightdale, Lake Junaluska, Lakeview, Leasburg, Ledger, Leicester, 
Liberty, Lilesville, LiUington, Littleton, Lurrber Bridge, Macon, Manly, Marston, Maxton, Merry 
Oaks, Micro, Milton, Momeyer, Moncure, Morrisville, Morven, Mt. Gilead, Mt. Olive, Mt. Vernon 
Nashville, New Hill, Niagara, NorHna, Orrum, Oxford, Parkton, Peachland, Pembroke, Pinebluff, 
Pine Level, Pittsboro, Plumtree, Polkton, Princeton, Proctorville, Raeford, Raleigh, Ramseur, Red 
Oak, Ridgeway, Rockingham, Rolesville, Roseboro, Rougemont, Rowland, Roxboro, Salemburg, 
Sanford, Seagrove, Semora, Siler City, Skyland, Southern Pines, Spring Hope, Spruce Pine, Staley, 
Star, Stedman, Stem, Stocksville, Stovall, Swannanoa, Swiss, St. Pauls, Troy, Vander, Vass, Vaughan, 
Wade, Wadesboro, Wagram, Warren Plains, Warrenton, Weaverville, Wendell, West End, Wilsons Mills, 
Wise, Woodfin, Yanceyville, Youngsville, Zebulon. 

South Carohna: Andrews, Bethune, Bishopville, Blaney, Cades, Cheraw, Chesterfield, CHo, Dar- 
lington, Dillon, Dovesville, Elhott, Florence, Greeleyville, Hartsville, Hemingway, Jefferson, Johnson- 
ville, Kingstree, Lake City, Lakeview, Lamar, Lane, Latta, Little Rock, Lugoff, Lynchburg, Manning, 
Marion, Mayesville, Mullins, McBee, McColl, Mt. Groghan, Nichols, Olanto, Pageland, Pamplico, 
Paxville, Pinewood, Ruby, Scranton, Society Hill, Summerton, Sumter, Tatum, Timmonsville, 1931,. 
North Carohna: Additions, Bailey, Johns, Middlesex. 

South Carohna: Addition, Blenheim. 

CITIES IN WHICH STREET RAILWAYS ARE OPERATED 

Asheville, Raleigh. 



OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 





Electric Department 




1930 


1931 


Operating revenue, current 


$ 8,483,746.10 
16,566.38* 
19,187.04 
2,775,323.321 


$ 9,375,442.16 
29 350 65 


iKerchandise 


miscellaneous -. 


32 223 94 


Operating expenses. 


3,652,913.01t 




Street Railway Department 
Operating revenue . . __ 


$ 440,653.87 
317,922.30t 


$ 384,333.36 
305,638.301 


Operating expenses 





•Deficit. 

tExclusive of taxes, etc. 



214 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— NORTH CAROLINA 
Electric Department 





1930 


1931 


Operating Revenue: 


$ 6,773,739.15 
18,270.12* 
15,412.28 


$ 7,615,801.74 
18,434.58 
20,434.58 


Merchandise and jobbing 








Total - 


$ 6,770,881.31 


S 7,654,252.12 






$ 3,009,236. 15t 


$ 3,009,516. 35t 





♦Deficit. 

tExclusive of taxes, etc. 



STATISTICS— NORTH CAROLINA 
Electric 





1930 


1931 


Plants, capacity: 
Hydro - 


206,300 
46,750 


206,300 


Steam 


46,750 






Total-- 


253,050 

366,930,040 
56,755,770 


253,050 


Current: 
Generated: 
Hydro 


521,459,820 


Steam " 








Total - - - 


423,664,740 
82,718,703 


521,459,820 




8,921,444 




117,513,226 








Total - 


506,383,443 

956,400 

109,281,385 

383,083,814 

13,061,844 


647,894,490 


Used by company 


898,072 


Unaccounted for 


120,154,850 


Sold - - .. 


526,841,568 


Exported -. - - . 








Total 


506,383,443 
51,370 


647,894,490 




50,676 







Carolina Power and Light Company 
street Bailway 



215 



Asheville 



1931 



Raleigh 



1930 



1931 



Operating revenue . 
Operating expenses . 



Kwhrs purchased 

Rotary converters 

Converters capacity (KW) 

Hours operated 

Passengers carried 

Cars operated, average 

Car miles operated 

Cars owned, passenger 

Cars owned, freight and express 

Cars owned, total - 

Track, miles, route 

Track miles, total 

Fare, average (cents) 

Busses (operated in connection with railway) 

Owned, number 

Seating capacity 

Operated, average number 

Seating capacity, daily average 

Length route, miles 

Car miles operated 

Passengers carried . 

Fare, average (cents) _ 



291,397.52 
204,252.68 

3,736,495 

4 

1,400 

6,500 

5,031.519 

28 

1,438,372 

36 

8 

44 
17.29 
20.79 



251,616.23 
191,582.24 

3,410,840 

4 

1,400 

6,800 

4,249,579 

28 

1,274,601 



44 

15.72 
18.83 
5.87 



$ 149,256.35 
113,669.62 

1,570,140 

2 

1,000 

6,500 

1,886,997 

13 

731,954 

32 

2 

34 
11.61 
14.46 



3 

63 

1 

21 

1.5 

45,733 

77,232 

7.25 



$ 132,717.13 
114,056.06 

1,590,560 

2 

1.000 

8,700 

1,673,678 

13 

733,939 

25 

3 

28 
11.61 
14.32 
7.58 

8 

63 

1 

21 

1.5 

43,571 

60,725 

7.19 



216 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

BALANCE SHEET— 1930 



Balance 

December 31, 

1930 



Liabilitiea 



Balance 

December 31, 

19.0 



Fixed Capital. 
Change 



Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change 

Interest and Dividends Received 
Change 



Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies _ 

Change... 

Prepayments 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Assets 

•Change 



Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Change 

Miscellaneous Investments 

Change 

Sinking Funds 

Change 

Special Deposits 

Change 



Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense. 

Change 

Clearing and Apportioned Ac- 
counts 

Change 

Work in Progress 

Change 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Change 



Adjustment Accounts: 
Reacquired Securities Stock- 
Change 

Treasury Securities Bonds --. 



Total.- 
Change . 



$ 94,663,178.30 
16,146,051.88 



1,226,217.51 

5,002,793.03 

1,091,576.78 

2,618,461.21 

1,340,523.93 

275,621.87 

104.73 

105.45 



768,428.81 

144,000.43 

19,416.89 

902.93 

33,864.25 

14.75 



1.00 

1.00' 

58,271.98 

7,568.98 

3,819.11 

3,819.11 

10,975.00 

600.00 



847,952.63 
6,816.4r 

44,474.01 

27,348.70 

3,026,073.08 

8,698,514.84^ 

144,710.35 

34,439.92 



125,625.81 
56,868.81 
106,000.00 



$103,511,214.17 
9,805.32 



Capital Stock 

Capital Stock Subscribed. 

Change 

Long Term Debt 

Change 



CaRRENT Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Consumers' Extension Deposit 

Change 

Dividends Declared 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Liabilities- 
Change 



Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities 
Change 



Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve... 

Change 

Casualty and Insurance Reserves 

Change 

Contribution to Extensions.. - 

Change 

Contingency Reserve 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Miscellaneous Unadjusted Credits 

Change 

Profit and Loss-Surplus 

Change 



Total... 
Change . 



$ 43,473,041.62 

33,150.00 

33,150.00 

46,597,360.00 

345.640.00* 



51,053.64 
49, 857. 18* 
155,741.72 
19,937. 33» 
45,772.82 
772.82* 
422,106.75 
128,135.00* 
1,568.50 
16,404.80* 



765,490.05 
252,587.11* 
622,833.44 
9,930.50* 
39.168.69 
35.360.51 



,793,134.09 

463,525.64 

136,841.39 

1,920.18 

8,667.26 

3,954.19 

72,823.00 

18,430.84* 

515,594.54 

124,698.43 

94,999.47 

41,850.93 

,680,867.19 

157.041.02 



$103,511,214.17 
9.805.32 



* Deer ease. 



Casolixa Powes A2fD LiGHT Compa:7y 

B A T.A N 'CE SHEET — 1931 



2ir 



-\sscts 






liabilities 



Balance 
Dece-ber 31. 

nil 



Fixed Capital- 
Change 



I 
Ctbsext Assets: 

Cash- 

Change... 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change 

Interest and Dividends Receved . 
Change \ 

Iktextoeixs axd Peepaid Ex- i 

PEXSES: I 

Material and Supplies I 

Change 

Prepayments ] 

Change j 

Miscellaneous Current .Assets 

Change , 

MiSCELLAXEOCS AssETs: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Miscellaneous Investments— 

Change 

Sinking Funds 

Change 



1.513,222.07 

289,004.56 

17.896.39 

604,973.%* 

1.609.394.53 

I83.K4.72 

57.96 

46.77 



7S4, 004.39 

15,575.58 

64,716.65 

25,449.71' 

142.660.01 

108,795.76 



1.00 
141,169.67 
82,297.69 



Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense. 

Change 

Work in Progress 

Change 

Miscellaneous Deferred Debita.. 
Change _. 



Adjustment .Accounts: 

Reacquired Securities 

Change 



Total — 
Change. 



3,819.11" 



810.406.55 
37.546.08' 

603.141.06 

2.891.639.16 

16.535.06 

27.338.95 



92.488.58 
33.137.23' 



5103,611.459.38 
206.245.21 



Ci;::iai Stock Sutecribed 

Change 

l4)ng Term Debt 

Change 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

C<Hisumers' Deposta 

Change 

Dividends Declared 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Iial»liti€s. 
Change 



Accrued Liabixjties: 

Taxes Acenied... 

Change 

Interest -Accrued 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities 
Change 



Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change... 

Casualty and Insurance Reserves 

Change 

Contribution to Extensiona— 

Change 

Contingency Reserve 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Miscellaneous Unadjusted Credits 
Change... 



S ^.473, 

129. 

96, 

46.553, 

61, 

175, 

117. 

184, 

16, 

314, 

99, 

1. 



Profit and Loes-Sorplus.. 
Ch&nge 



Total... 

Change. 



041.62 
438.00 
288.00 
,260.00 
900.00 
910.81 
976.92 
760.68 
753.86* 
656.75 
569.75* 
515.25 
53.25* 



814,454.35 
47.964.30 
626,274.65 

3,441.21 
100,637.11 
61,468.42 



4,115.211.37 

325.077.28 

182.586.99 

45.745.60 

10.508.24 
1,S40.93 
112.51S.29 
451.746.54 
24.152.71* 
31.&W.90 
63.589.57* 

6.329.277.83 
351.589.36* 



$103,611,459.38 
206.2i5.21 



*Decriasz 



218 



'N, C. Corporation OommissIon' 



CONCORD AND KANNAPOLIS GAS COMPANY 

Incorporated April 28, 1917, under Laws of North Carolina. 

Main ofRce: Concord, N. C. 

Officers (1930-31): President, A. E. Peirce, Vice President, W. H, Wildes, Treasurer, W, S. McCuUough; 
Secretary, W. M. McFarland, all of Chicago. 

Gas plants operated at Concord and Kannapolis. 

OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 





1930 


1931 


Operating Revenue: 
Gas. - -..--.-. 


$ 


49,336.78 
803.05 


$ 


47,130.84 


Merchandise and jobbing . _ . . 


821.06* 






Total 


$ 


50,139.83 
25,901.10t 


$ 


46,309.78 




28,251.51t 







♦Deficit. 

fExclusive of taxes, etc. 



STATISTICS 



1930 



1931 



Coal gas benches, number 

Coal gas benches, capacity (M.C.F.) .. 

Water gas sets, number 

Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.) 

Holder, capacity (M.C.F.) 

Gas manufactured: 

Coal gas (M.C.F.) 

Water gas (M.C.F.) 

Total 

Sales to consumers 

Used by the company 

Unaccounted for 

Coal carbonized, tons 

Oil used, gallorjs 

Cost of coal, average, per ton 

Cost of oil, average, per gallon (cents) 

Coke produced; tons 

Coke, value, per ton 

Tar produced, gallons 

Mains, miles. ..: 

Customers, number 



2 


2 


120 

1 

100 


120 


96 


70 


40 


28,715.5 


28,495.9 


774 


1,117.0 


29,489.5 


29,612.9 


23,974.3 


22,867.7 


370.7 


359.1 


5,144.5 


6,386.1 


1,933 


1,959 


2,712 


2,870 


$5.02 


$4.87 


6.85 


6.33 


1,388 


1,365 


$6 


$6 


21,815 


19,590 


30 


30 


915 


888 



CoNCpED AND KaNNAPOLIS GaS CoMPANY 
BALANCE SHEET— 1930 



219 



Assets 



Balance 
December 31, 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1930 



Fixed Capital 

Change 

Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex 
pense: 

Material and Supplies 

Change.— 

Prepayments 

Change 

Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com 

panics 

Change 

Suspense: 

Miscellaneous Suspense. 

Change. 

Total 

Change 



232,196.77 
100.51 



3,963.47 

2,979.88* 

12,020.03 

322.68 



4,131.69 

1,266.69* 

335.77 

48.54* 



28,100.00 
22,157.88 



122.46 
183.60* 



$ 280,870.19 
18,102.59 



Capital Stock 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Profit and Loss— Surplus 

Change 



Total-.. 
Change. 



$ 150,000.00 



2,370.50 

168.54 

160.00 

12.00* 



450.47 

449.53* 

180.51 

91.58 



59,866.58 
1,614.00* 
2,102.93 
1,114.01 
65,739.20 
18,803.99 



$ 280,870.19 
18,102.59 



"Decrease . 



220 



N. C. CoEPOEATiON Commission 

BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Fixed Capital. 
Change 



CtTERENT Assets: 

Cash. 

Change 

Accounts Receivable- 
Change 



Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Prepayments 

Change 



Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Change 



$ 234,063.46 
1,866.69 



1,116.40 
2,847.07* 
10,760.39 
1,259.64* 



5,187.79 

1,056.10 

131.05 

204.72* 



41,/l0.99 
13,610.99 



Suspense: 

Clearing and Apportionment Ac- 
counts 

Change... 

Work in Progress _ _. 

Change. _ 



122.46* 

414.70 

414.70 



Total- 
Change 



293,384.78 
12,514.59 



Capital Stock 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued. 

Change... 

Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Casualty and Insurance Reserves 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Profit and Loss— Surplus 

Change 



$ 150,000.00 



[,283.61* 

157.28 

2.72* 



337.26 
113.21* 
130.60 
49.91* 



62,265.33 

2,398.75 

17.38 

17.38 

1,415.22 

687.71* 

77,974.82 

12,235.62 



TotaL... 
Change. 



$ 293,384.78 
12,514.59 



*Decrease. 



Duke Power Company 



221 



DUKE POWER COMPANY 

Incorporated May 1, 1917, under the Laws of New Jersey. 

Main office: Charlotte, N. C. 

Officers, 1930-31: President, G. G. Allen, New York; Vice-Presidents, VV. R. Perkins, New York, 
W. S.Lee, Charlotte, N. A. Cocke, Charlotte, C. I. Burkeholder, Charlotte, W. S. Lee, Charlotte; Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, W. C. Parker, New York, 

TOWNS AND CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTKICITY, WHOLESALE 

1930: Albemarle, Benton Heights, Cherryville, Concord, Cornelius, Dallas, Davidson, Forest City, 
Gastonia, Granite Falls, Huntersville, Kings Mountain, Landis, Lexington, Lincolnton, Maiden, Mon- 
roe, Newton, Rutherfordton, Shelby, Statesville, Spindale, N. C; South Carolina points: Abbeville, 
Clinton, Donalds, Due West, Easley, Greenwood, Greer, Newberry, Ninety Six, Prosperity, Rock 
Hill, Seneca, Westminster. 

1931: Same with elimination of Rutherfordton, Spindale and Abbeville. 



OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 
Electric Division 





1930 


1931 


Operating revenue . .. . 


$ 16,043,540.32 
8,686,423.49 


$ 16,399,817.84 


Operating expenses* .- 


9,113,888.45 







'Exclusive of uncollectible, taxes, etc. 

STATISTICS— ELECTRIC 



1930 



1931 



Plants, Capacity: 

Hydro _. 

Steam 

Current: 
Generated: 

Hydro 

Steam 

Total 

Purchased and received 

Used by company 

Unaccounted for 

Sold 

Customers, number 



483,759 


483,459 


285,400 


271,800 


1,116,848,700 


1,055,446,460 


348,647,000 


302,883,000 


1,465,495,700 


1,358,329,460 


226,942,546 


344,084,161 


60.359,162 


60,730,781 


230,136,833 


223,677,942 


1,401,942,250 


1,418,004,898 


754 


604 



222 



i^. C. Corporation Commission 

BALANCE SHEET— 1930 



Balance 

December 31, 

1930 



Liabilities 



Balance 
December 31, 



Fixed Capital 

Change 

Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change 

Interest and Dividends Received 
Change 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex 

PENSES: 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Prepayments 

Change 

Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Change 

Miscellaneous Investments 

Change 

Sinking Funds 

Change 

Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Change 

Work in Progress 

Change 

Total 

Change 



$121,775,376.05 
1,594,795.18 



3,254,217.86 

1,118,728.83 

93,813.64 

85,672.37' 

5,786,568.25 

1, 589, 368. 89- 

361,344.41 

6,495.79 



1,372,779.70 
13,056.19- 
73,548.56 
19,050.38 



34,771,927.50 

29,562.50 

3,933,965.70 

2,462,122.63= 

28,714.77 

4,306.24 



1,876,065.96 
22,198.59^ 
39,978.02 
35,978.02 



$173,364,300.42 
3,600,959.39' 



Capital Stock 

Change 

Long Term Debt 

Change 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Dividends Declared 

Change 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Casualty and Insurance Reserves 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Miscellaneous Unadjusted Credits 

Change 

Profit and Loss — Surplus 

Change 



TotaL_.. 
Change- 



Si 01, 299, 596. 50 
1,980,486.20 
40,232,000.00 
6,810,000.00* 



924,721.25 
461,137.50* 
1,267,717.75 
1,955,731.20* 



1,254,313.44 
100,272.70* 
152,030.00 
116,666.67 
233,500.00 
129,253.73* 



17,766,364.27 

3,471,540.82 

470,394.75 

40,018.09 

364,622.45 

364,622.45 

27.78 

10,860.76* 

10,029,012.23 

126,295.61 



$173,364,300.42 
3,600,959.39' 



"Decrease . 



Duke Power Company 

BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



223 



Assets 



Fixed Capital. 
Change 



Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Notes Receivable- - 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change 

Interest and Dividends Received. . 

Change. 

Marketable Securities 

Inventories and Prepaid Expenses. 

Material and SuppUes 

Change.. 

Prepayments 

Change 



Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in AflSliated Com- 
panies 

Change 

Miscellaneous Investments 

Change 

Sinking Funds 

Change 



Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense- 
Change 

Work in Progress 

Change 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Change 



Total... 
Change. 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



$122,476,699.62 
256,323.57 



2,988 

565 

113 

32 

1,523 

1 

415 

54 

6,757 

2,828 

1,216 

155 

49 

5 



,859.10 
,358.76^ 
,480.65 
,867.01 
,535.37 
,117.35 
,466.50 
,122.09 
,118.52 
,573.45 
,940.46 
,839.24* 
,929.40 
,928.78 



39,489,818.07 
757,040.34 
16,212.58 
10,791.95 
32,542.95 
3,828.18 



1,825,247.04 
50,818.92 



35,978.02 

2,839.42 

26,708.52 



$176,908,689.68 



Liabilities 



Capital Stock 

Change 

Long Term Debt 

Change. 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Matured Interest Unpaid 

Change 

Dividends Declared 

Change 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Casualty and Insurance Reserves 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Miscellaneous Unadjusted Credits 

Change 

Profit and Loss — Surplus 

Change 



TotaL-. 
Change. 



Balance 

December 31, 

1921 



$101,299,697.70 

101.20 

40,189,500.00 

26,000.00* 



843,171.84 

103,450.59 

151,617.50 

412.50* 

1,267,719.00 

1.25 



1,335,310.79 

80,997.35 

307,500.00 

74,000.00 



21,174.119.27 

3,407,755.00 

510,238.10 

39,843.35 

370,510.34 

5,887.89 

71.41 

43.63 

9,459,233.73 

569, 778.50* 



$176,908,689.68 
3,115,889.26 



"Decreas 



224 



]Sr. C. Corporation Commission 



DURHAM GAS COMPANY 

Incorporated January 4, 1928, under Laws of Maryland. 

Main office: Dvurham.N. C. 

Officers (1930-31): President, A. E. Peirce, Chicago; Vice-President, Wm. H. Wildes, Chicago; Treas- 
urer, W. S. McCuIIough, Chicago; Secretary, W. M. McFarland, Chicago. 

1930: Gas plant operated at Durham, N. C. 

1931: Gas plants operated at Durham and Chapel Hill, N. C. 





OPERATING 


REVENUE 


AND 


EXPENSES 








1930 


1931 


Operating Revenue: 
Gas - - . 


$ 173,546.09 


$ 


181,543.22 


Merchandise (net) -_..- 


567.45* 


Miscellaneous - - - 




8.74 
















$ 173,546.09 
92,196.60 


$ 


180,984.51 
103,835.04 







"Deficit. 



STATISTICS 



1930 



1931 



Coal Gas Benches: 

Number... 

Capacity (M.C.F.) 

Water Gas Sets: 

Number 

Capacity (M.C.F.) 

Holder capacity (M.C.F.)... 

Coal gas produced 

Water gas produced 

Total—. 

Used by company. 

Unaccounted for 

Sold 

Coal carbonized, tons... 

Coal cost, average, per ton 

Oil used, gallons 

Oil cost, average, per gallon (cents) — 

Coke produced, tons 

Coke, average value, per ton 

Tar produced, gallons 

Tar, average value, per gallon (cents). 

Mains, miles 

Customers, number 



5 
300 

1 

1.000 

240 

104,416 

20.720 

125.136 

427 

16,358 

108,351 

8,206 

$5.35 

60.718 

6.67 

5.333 



104,544 



63.458 
3,013 



5 

350 

1 

700 

240 

123.378.9 

15.122.5 

138,501.4 

365 

20,236.7 

117,899.7 

9.948.48 

$5.01 

44,157 

6.2 

6,194.68 

$5.15 

119.381 

3.8 

71.76 

2.874 



Durham Gas Company 

BAIiANCE SHEET — 1930 



225 



Assets 


Balance 

December 31, 

1930 


Liabilities 


Balance 

December 31, 

1930 


Fixed Capital.. . 


$1,054,961.08 
164,703.72 

4,002.92 
14,821.13* 
79,399.08 
1,666.94 
1,223.00 
1,148.00 

16,080.60 

972.06* 
4,971.52 
1,055.89 


Capital Stock -_ -. .-- - 


$ 80,000.00 










Long Term Debt . 


800,000.00 








Cash 


Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 










75,000.00 






75,000.00 






15,080.67 






9,423.17 






10,835.40 


Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 




1,256.58 


penses: 


Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued--- 






4,506.62 


Prepayments 


Change 


500 68 


Change 


Interest Accrued 


2 055 13 




Change .... - .- - - . 


35,676.80* 


Change .. ..-_-. 




Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities 
Change - _ 


791.17 




82,243.08 

82,243.08 

75.00 

75.00 


791.17 


Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 


Advances to Affiliated Companies 


234,521.26 
178 ,'521. 26 


panies 


Reserves: 
Retirement Reserve 




Change . . 




Special Deposits 


13,481.86 
7,561.60 
11,163.50 


Change 


Change 










138.04 






4,479.32 






3,065.36 




Total 




Total 


$ 1,242,956.29 


$ 1 242 956 29 


Change .... 


Change 


2.34 450 34 











'Decrease. 



15 



226 



N. C. CoKPORATiON Commission 

BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



Assets 


Balance 

December 31, 

1931 


Liabilities 


Balance 

Decem,ber 31, 

1931 


Fixed Capital -.. . . .. 


$ 1,066,118.61 
11,157.53 

9,573.89 
5,570.96 
64,295.21 
15,103.87* 


Capital Stock 


$ 80,000 00 


Change .. 


Change .. 






Long Term Debt . . 


800,000.00 


Ctjbrent Assets: 


Change.. . 




Cash - — 


Current Liabilities: 
Notes payable 




Change . .-. 




Accounts Receivable 




Change 


Change . 


75,000.00* 


Interest and Dividends Receivable 


Accounts Payable 


7,843.94 




1,223.00* 

17,366.68 

1,286.08 

8,709.94 

3,738.42 

65.00 

10.00* 

68.85 

68.85 

16,634.65 

16,634.65 




7,236.73 




Consumers' Deposits 


11,592.05 


Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 


Change 


758.65 


penses: 
Material and Supplies .-- 


Accrued Liabilities: 
Taxes accrued 




Change .. 




Prepayments .. 


Change . . - 


4,506.62* 


Change ... . . 


Interest Accrued . . . 


6,475.33 


Special Deposits 


Change 


4,420.20 


Change .. 


Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities 


120.00 




671.17* 


Suspense: 


Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change 


261.453.45 
26,932.19 




Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 








Work in Progress 


84,157.91 


Change 


Change 


70,676.05 






14,418.69 






3,255.19 






83,228.54* 






78,749.22 




Total 




Total - - 


$ 1,182,832.83 


$ 1,182,832.83 


Change 


Change . 


60,123.46* 











*Decrease. 



Durham Public Service Company 



227 



DURHAM PUKLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

Incorporated February 1, 1901, under the Laws of North Carolina. 

Main office: Durham, N. C. 

Officers, 1930-31: Henry L. Doherty, President, New York; R. L. Lindsay, Vic3-President and Gen- 
eral Manager, Durham; A. W. Grady, Secretary and Treasurer, Durham. 

Towns and Cities served with electricity: Durham . 

Street railway operated : Durham. 



OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 
Electric Department 



Operating revenues.. 
•Operating expenses. 



1930 



715,466.23 
427,564.33 



1931 



723,727.44 
409,374.65 





Street Railway Department 






Operating revenues . . . . 


$ 221,537.76 
202,603.30 


$ 


206,320.23 


•Operating expenses _ - . . .. 


163,979.90 







STATISTICS— ELECTRIC 





1930 


1931 


Plants, Capacity: 
Steam (K.W.) . . . 


3,100 

13,580 

20,036,000 

1,696,117 

2,471,145 

15,882,318 

8,848 


3,100 


Current: 
Generated (K.W.H.) 


330 




20,128,000 


Used by the company (K.W.H.) 

Unaccounted for (K.W.H.) .._.-- . ... 


1,382,403 
2,273,149 


Sold (K.W.H.) 


16,472,778 
9,107 







STATISTICS— STREET RAILWAY 






1930 


1931 


Rotary converters . .. . 


2 

600 

6,566 

2,553,429 

5 

1,033,603 

12 


2 


Rotary converters capacity . . .. .. 


600 


Hours operated . ._ 
















Cars owned, passenger 


4 


Cars owned, freight and express 




Cars owned, total 


12 
3.89 
3.89 


4 


Track, miles, route . 


3.89 


Track, miles, total .. . 


3.89 


Average fare 





228 



'N. C. Corporation Commission 



1930 



Busses (operated in connection with Street Railway) 

Owned 

Seating capacity 

Operated, average number 

Operated average daily seating capacity 

Length of route, miles 

Car miles operated 

Passengers carried, number 

Fare, average 



20 

75 

18 

414 

31.77 

1,017,355 

2,864,943 

.083 



23 

591 

18 

450 

31.77 

983,940 

,297,266 

.083 



BALANCE SHEET— 1930 



Assets 



Balance 
December 31, 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1930 



Fixed Capital. 

Change 

Current Assets: 

Cash... 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change... 

Interest and Dividends Receivable 
Change 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Prepayments 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Assets 

Change. 

Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Change 

Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Change 



Total.... 
Change. 



$ 3,343,465.93 
142,583.62 



17,227.48 

909.32 

19,917.52 

415.21 

278,065.04 

5,044.30* 

962.74 

608.04 



81,244.65 

14,374.73* 

19,343.30 

7,892.44* 

846.75 

90.00 



1.00 
1,251.00 



164,509.19 
9,014.04* 



$ 3,926,854.59 
108,280.68 



Capital Stock 

Change. 

Long Term Debt. 
Change... 



Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Liabilities. 
Change 



Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued.. 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities 

Change 

Advances to AffiUated Companies 
Change 



Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Casualty Special Surplus 

Change 

Contributions to Extensions. 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Profit and Loss — Surplus 

Change 



1,000,000.00 
1,900,000.00 



108,257.85 
2,155.34 

46,702.60 
1,167.49* 

10,142.25 
1,848.04* 



26,874.45 
9,350.95 

33,053.27 
34.74* 
32.70 
16.78 

98,316.92 

17,530.69 



169,685.81 
208,354.83* 
215,000.00 
215,000.00 

20,361.60 
3,612.00 

72,412.16 

21,234.45 
226,014.98 

50,785.57 



TotaL... 
Change. 



$3,926,854.59 
108,280.68 



*Decrease. 



Durham Public Service Company 
balance sheet— 1981 



229 



Assets 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Liabilities 



Balance, 

December 31 

1931 



Fixed Capital. 
Change 



Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change 

Interest and Dividends Receivable 
Change 



Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Prepayments --. 

Change 



Miscellaneous Assets: 

Miscellaneous Investments 

Change 

Bad Debt Accounts Receivable. 
Change 



Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense- 
Change 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Change 



Adjustment Accounts: 
Contra Accounts — Stock.. 
Change 



Total... 
Change. 



$ 3,252,635.63 
90,830.30* 



21,791.29 

4,563.81 

40,157.35 

26,413.39 

600,432.15 

366,144.68 

1,455.06 

472.32 



56,940.99 

24,303.65* 

9,089.74 

4,107.69* 



1,406.00 

154.00 

37,290.42 

6,487.15* 



264,224.33 
99,715.14 
145,368.67 
139,222.80 



3,755.00 
3,265.31" 



$ 4,434,546.63 
507,692.04 



Capital Stock 

Long Term Debt. 
Change 



Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Change 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Liabilities. 
Change 



Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change , 



Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Contributions to extensions- 
Special Surplus Reserve 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Contra Accounts 

Change 

Profit and Loss— Surplus 

Change 



Total.... 
Change. 



$ 1,000,000.00 

2,410,800.00 

510,800.00 



25,000.00 
25,000.00 
87,863.59 
20,426.96* 
47,531.22 

828.62 
2,862.09 

259.85* 



8,183.93 
18,690.52* 
45,808.96 
12,755.69 



98,316.92* 



186,690.93 

17,005.12 

22,603.30 

215,000.00 

70,655.78 

1,756.38* 

3,755.00 

3,265.31* 

307,791.83 

81,776.85 



$ 4,434,546.63 



"Decrease. 



230 "N. C. Corporation Commission 



EAST TENNESSEE LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY 

Incorporated March 9, 1927, under the Laws of Virginia. 

Main office: Bristol, Tenn . 

Officers (1931): President, Henry L. Doherty, New York; Vice-President, W. A. Jones, New York; 
Secretary, J. C. York, Bristol, Tenn.; Treasurer, J. C. York, Bristol, Tenn. 

TOWNS AND CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTRICITT— 1931 

Bristol, Va., Bristol, Tenn., Bluff City, Tenn ., Elizabethton, Tenn., Newland, N. C, Elk Park, N. C. , 
Blountville, Tenn., Mendota, Va., Benhams, Va., Erwin, Tenn., Montezuma, N. C, Mountain City, 
Tenn., Butler, Tenn., Linville, N. C, Pineola, N. C, Heaton, N. C, Cranberry, N. C, Minneapolis, 
N. C, Frank, N. C, Senia, N. C, Unicoi, Tenn., Neva, Tenn., Shouns, Tenn., Wallace, Va. 

OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— 1931 

Electric Division 

Operating reyenue $644,679.13 

Operating expenses* 277,723.79 

Gas Division 

Operating revenue $102,349.05 

Operating expenses 70,474.85 



STATISTICS— 1931 

Plants, Capacity: 

Hydro 3,875 

Steam 

Cureent: 
Generated: 

Hydro (K.W.H.) 12,953,368 

Purchased (K.W.H.) 7.539,340 

Used by company (K.W.H.) 492,635 

Unaccounted for (K.W.H.) 3,670,172 

Sold (K.W.H.) 16,329,901 

Customers, number 8,941 



♦Exclusive of taxes, etc. 



Tennessee Light and Power Company 
balance sheet — 1931 



Assets 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Fixed Capital — 

Change _ 

Current Assets: 

Cash - 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change — 

Accounts Receivable 

Change _. 

Interest and Dividends Receivable 
Change 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses : 

Material and Supplies 

Change. 

Prepayments 

Change 

Advances to AflBliated Companies- 
Change 

Miscellaneous Assets: 

Miscellaneous Investments 

Change 

Sinking Funds 

Change 

Earnings Receivable from Sub- 
sidiaries 

Change.. 

Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Change 

Clearing and Apportionment Ac- 
counts 

Change 

Adjustment Accounts: 

Earnings Receivable reserve 

Change 

Treasury-Securities 

Total 

Change.. 



$ 5.763,470.38 
80,602.77 



22,664.16 

93,940.46* 

20,368.34 

1,683.96 

366,073.47 

23,906.87* 

1,902.99 

478.94 



76,843.23 
14,129.85* 
1,672.44=* 
4,564.62 
782,181.18 
17,721. gi^* 



9,511.00 

1,125.08* 

78,963.35 

6,762.51 

232,196.90 
66,743.51 



4,648.43 

255.22'' 



9,309.42 
5,689.58 



435,515.56 
21,719.67* 
61,000.00 



$ 7,862,975.97 
17,652.33* 



Capital Stock 

Change 

Long Term Debt. 
Change 



$ 1,973,875.00 



2,792,000.00 



Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Change 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Dividends Declared and not Paid 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change... 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities 

Change 

Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change 



45,500.00 
8,168.67* 
14,539.71 
11,528.63* 
19,644.48 
1,645.48 
3,952.50 



59,973.23 

16,108.32 

612.09* 

259.47* 

10,437.50 



Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Unamortized Debt Expense.. 

Change. 

Contributions to Extensions. 

Change. 

Contingency Reserve 

Change... 

Special Surplus Reserve 

Change 

Profit and Loss — Surplus 

Change. 



1.206,863.61 
66,842.70 



341,087.14 

19,813.19 

435,515.58 

21,719.67* 

12,036.24 

2,610.42 

48,263.26 

3.313.93 

100,000.00 



799,899.83 
47,373.49 



TotaL... 
Change. 



$ 7,862,975.97 
17,652.33* 



"Decrease. 



232 



^. C. Corporation Commission 



ELIZABETH AND SUBURBAN GAS COMPANY 

Incorporated May 23, 1927. 

Main office: Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Officers: President, N. H. Gellert, Philadelphia; Secretary, M, McKenhar, Philadelphia; Treasurer, 
A. R. Fritz, Philadelphia. 
Gas plant operated at Elizabeth City. 



OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 



Operating revenue . 
Operating expenses" 



1931 
$24,579.09 
22,245.38 



STATISTICS 

1931 

Water gas manufactured (M.C.F.) 16,289 

Gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 12,681.7 

Gas used by company (M.C.F.) 184.7 

Gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 3,402.7 

Mains, miles 15.85 

Customers, number 601 



BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



Assets 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Fixed Capital 

Change 

Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change.. 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex 
penses: 

Material and SuppUes 

Change 

Prepayments 

Change 

Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com 

panies 

Change. 

Total 

Change 



$ 180,068. 



262.50 
1,331.56 
6,785.97 
1.283.55 



1,598.94 
305. 68 t 
922.47 
381.42 



78.96 
78.96 



$ 189,717.03 
470.50 



Capital Stock. 

Long Term Debt 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves. 

Change . 

Profit and Loss — Surplus ., 

Change 

Total... 

Change 



i 68,000.00 
104,000.00 



909.10 

l,715.43t 

450.66 

32.56 



826.28 

45.92t 

433.35 

19,189.42 

8,209.44 



23,959.78 

256. 40t 
1,143.62 
192.25 
29.195.18t 
5,946.00t 



189.717.03 
470.50 



•Exclusive of taxes, etc. 
tin red. 



Gastonia a^^d Suburban Gas Company 



233 



GASTONIA AND SUBURBAN GAS COMPANY 

Incorporated in 1917, under Laws of North Carolina. 

Main office: Gastonia, N. C. 

Officers (1930-31): President, A. E. Peirce, Chicago; Secretary, W. M. McFarland, Chicago; Treasurer, 
W. S. McCullough, Chicago. 

Towns and cities served with gas: Gastonia, Dallas. 

OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 



1930 



1931 



Operating revenue- 
Operating expenses* 



58,411.51 
33,194.37 



52,516.93 
37,116.48 



'Deficit. 



STATISTICS 





1930 


1931 


Water gas sets 


2 
. 400 
75 
32,069 
172 
3,753 
28,144 


2 


Water capacity (M.C.F.) 


700 


Holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Water gas produced (M.C.F.) 

Used by company 


75 

29,478.2 

171.5 


Unaccounted for 


3,613.7 


Sold . 


25,693 


Coal carbonized, tons 




Oil used, gallons 


92,240 
.0653 
9,221 
.02 
40.22 
1,013 


83,279 


Average cost oil -.. -. . 


.0599 


Tar produced, gallons 


7,900 


Average value tar 


.02 


Mains, miles 


40.3 


Customers, number .. 


953 







234 



iN". C. Corporation Commission 

BALANCE SHEET— 1930 



Assets 



Balance 
December 31, 



Liabilities 



Balance 
December 31, 



Fixed Capital. 
Change 



Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Accounts Receivable. 
Change 



Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Prepajrments - 

Change -.- 



MiscELLANEOtrs AssETs: 
Investments in AflSliated Com- 
panies 

Change 

Special Deposits, — . 

Change 



Sxjspense: 

Miscellaneoxis Suspense. 
Change. 



Total.... 
Change. 



215,412.87 
3,495.62 



3,531.89 

1,204.42* 

15,480.19 

1,167.67 



5,076.23 
1,248.83* 
818.96 
468.75 



10,699.18 
10,475.86 
500.00 
500.00* 



133.10 
133.10 



251,652.42 
12,787.75 



Capital Stock 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Advances to AflBliated Companies 
Change 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserve 

Change 

Profit and Loss — Surplus 

Change 



$ 100,000.00 



886.92 
2,700.30* 
2,658.17 

1.62.79* 



1,051.43 

529.24 

16,094.36 

3,460.45* 



33,109.32 
2,047.60* 
771.42 
166.51 
97,080.80 
20,463.14 



Total-... 
Change. 



$ 251,652.42 
12,787.75 



^Decrease 



Henderson and Oxford Gas Company 
balance sheet— 1931 



235 



Assets 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Fixed Capital. 
Change 



Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Accounts Receivable- 
Change ..- 



Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies. 

Change 

Prepayments 

Change 



$ 218,503.82 
3,090.95 



1,125.96 
2,405.93* 
14,608.09 
872.10* 



5,116.99 

40.76 

1,740.83 

921.87 



Capital Stock $ 100,000.00 



Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 



Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued. 

Change 

Advances to AflSliated Companies 
Change 



Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Change 



Suspense: 

Work in Progress 

Change 

Miscellaneous Suspense- 
Change 



6,192.96 
4,506.22 



1,723.55 

1,723.55 

25.60 

107.50* 



Reserves: 

Retirem ent Reserve 

Change 

Casualty and Insurance Reserves 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserve 

Change 

Profit and Loss — Surplus 

Change... 



Total—. 
Change- 



$ 249,037.80 
2,614.62^ 



Total— 
Change. 



780.05 

106.87* 

2,458.69 

199.48* 



378.32 
673.11* 
818.94 
15,275.42* 



34,751.70 

1,642.38 

26.84 

26.84 

990.84 

219.42 

108,832.42 

11,751.62 



S 249,037.80 
2,614.62* 



* Decrease. 



HENDERSON AND OXFORD GAS COMPANY 

Incorporated May 19, 1927. 

Main office: Henderson, N. C. 

Officers: President, N. H. Gellert, Philadelphia; Secretary, G. L. Haynes, Chicago; Treasurer, W. J. 
Rose, Chicago. 



Gas properties operated in Henderson and Oxford. 



OPER.A.TING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 



Operating revenue--. 
Operating expenses* . 



1931 
$21,365.70 
25,957.13 



♦Exclusive of taxes, etc. 



236 



^N". C. Corporation Com^mission 



STATISTICS 

1931 

Water gas sets, number 1 

Water gas sets, capacity (M.CF.) 100 

Holder capacity (M.CF.) 50 

Water gas mjanufactured (M.CF.)... 16,061.5 

Gas sales to consumers (M.CF.) 11,420 

Gas used by company (M.CF.) 

Gas unaccounted for (M.CF.) 4,641.5 

Coal carbonized, tons 330 

Coal, average cost $5.00 

Oil used, gallons 46,000 

Oil, average cost, gallon ' .06 

Mains, miles 22 

Customers, number.. 500 



BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



Assets 


Balance 

Dtecember 31, 

1931 


Liabilities 


Balance 

December 31, 

1931 


Fixed Capital 


$ 220,908.49 
97.59* 

637.46 
536.22 
10,986.09 
535.08* 

3,863.02 
1,519.23* 
252.82 
416.58* 

365.00 
365.00 


Capital Stock 


$ 63,000.00 


Change... .. 


Long Term Debt 


142,000.00 


CuERENT Assets: 

Cash 


Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable . 


525.32 


Change _ 




525.32 


Accounts Receivable 




1,732.37 


Change 




3,890.47* 






683.80 




Change 


148.80 


PBNSES: 

Material and Supplies 


Accrued Liabilities: 






1,092.85 






223.11* 


Change 


Advances to Affiliated Companies 


52,620.58 




20,421.13 


Suspense: 

Miscellaneous Suspense 


Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 




Change.- . . 


21,796.50 




Change 


653.13* 






3,052.33 






257.81 






49,490.87* 






18,253.61* 




Total 




Total 


$ 237,012.88 
1,667.26 


$ 237,012.88 


Change 


Change . 


1,667.26* 









*In red. 



]N'ational Utilities Company of [N'orth Carolina 



237 



NATIONAL UTILITIES COMPANY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Incorporated February 23, 1928, under the Laws of North Carolina. 

Main office: Benton Harbor, Mich . 

Officers (1930): President, H. A. Sebold, Battle Creek, Mich.; Secretary and Assistant Treasurer, 
D. H. Frazer, Jr., Battle Creek, Mich. 

Officers (1931): President, Paul R. Taylor, Benton Harbor, Mich.; Vice President, F. W. Seymore, 
Battle Creek, Mich.; Secretary and Assistant Treasurer, P. H. Frazer, Jr., Battle Creek, Mich.; Treas- 
urer and Assistant Secretary, M. D. Read, Benton Harbor, Mich. 

City served with electricity; Marion, N. C. 

City served with gas: Statesville, N. C. 



OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 



1930 



1931 



Electric: 

Operating revenue. 
Operating expenses 

Gas: 
Operating revenue.. 
Operating expenses. 



33,865.79 
32,499.50 


$ 


32,116.22 
33,981.95 


39,836.41 
32,933.22 


$ 


35,459.17 
31,255.87 



STATISTICS— ELECTRIC 



1930 



1931 



Plants, capacity: 

Hydro (K.W.) 

Oil (K.W.) 

Ci; brent: 
Generated: 

Hydro (K.W.H.) 

Oil(K.W.H.) 

Total (K.W.H.) 

Purchased (K.W.H.) 

Used by company (K.W.H.) 
Unaccounted for (K.W.H.).. 
Sold (K.W.H.) 



75 


75 


649 


649 


30,040 


230,400 


44,360 


664,210 


74,400 


894,610 


35,100 


368,100 


384 


5,455 


26,549 


276,456 


82,567 


980,799 



238 



]^. C. Corporation Commission 

STATISTICS— GAS 





1930 


1931 


Water gas sets, number... .... . . . ._ 


2 

480 

42 


2 


Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.) 


480 


Holder capacity (M.C.F.) 


42 


Water gas produced (M.C.F.) ... 


21,965 4 


Used by company (M.C.F.) 




166 7 


Unaccounted for . . . . 




3,229.3 


Sold 


20,406 


18,569.4 


Coal carbonized, tons . . ... . ... 


535.41 


Average cost coal . . . . . ._ .. . . 




15.27 


Coke used, tonS.. 




36 87 


Average cost coke . 




S7 24 


Oil used, gallons 




93,672 


Average cost oil.. ----- .. 




.0604 


Tar produced, gallons. . .. ._- .. - .. 




219.64 


Average value tar . . .....---.--.-- 




.02 


Mains, miles 


17.63 
672 


17 4 


Customers, number ... _.--.....-- _ - 


742 







BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



Assets 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Fixed Capital 

Change.- 

Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex 

PENSES: 

Material and Supplies 

Change.. 

Prepayments 

Change 

Miscellaneous Assets: 

Miscellaneous Special Funds 

Change 

Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Change 

Work in Progress 

Change 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Change 

Total- 

Change 



$ 518,469.57 
29,729.84 

2,321.67 

2,494.76* 

861.32 

861.32 

21,419.40 

3,482.83* 



9,098.84 
1,049.23 
2,765.85 
1,848.05 



674.43 
86.12 



626.75 
30.00* 
64.22 
9,754.64* 
8.10 
8.10 



$ 556,310.15 
15,721.97 



Capital Stock 

Long Term Debt 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities 

Change 

Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Contingency Reserve 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserve 

Change 

Miscellaneous Unadjusted Credits 

Change 

Profit and Loss— Surplus 

Change 

Total 

Change 



$ 179,207.43 
248,000.00 



4,225.46 

10,375.33* 

1,304.. 34 

140.84 

6,767.21 

19.40 

1,030.58 

251.64 

102,348.72 

50,935.96 



60,039.08 

635.37 

7,599.15 

6,766.95 

144.28 

144.28 

181.66 

181.66 

54,537.76* 

32, 475. ,52* 



$ 556,310.15 
15,721.97 



"Decrease. 



InToeth Carolina Public Service Company 



239 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

Incorporated February 28, 1924, under the Laws of North Carolina . 
Main office: Charlotte, N. C . 

Officers (1930-31): President, E. C. Marshall, Charlotte; Vice-Presidents, J. Paul Lucas, R. L. Peter 
man, Charlotte; Treasurer, D. G. Calder, Charlotte; Secretary, W. C. Parker, New York. 

TOWNS AND CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTRICITY, WHOLESALE — 19S0-S1 

High Point. 

TOWNS AND CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTRICITY, RETAIL — 19S0 

Burlington, Greensboro, Salisbury, High Point (Power only) . 

TOWNS AND CITIES IN WHICH GAS PROPERTIES ARE OPERATED — 1930-81 

Burlington, Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High Point, Salisbury. 

TOWNS AND CITIES IN WHICH STREET RAILWAY PROPERTIES ARE 
OPERATED — 1930-31 
Greensboro, Salisbury, High Point. 

TOWNS AND CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTRICITY, RETAIL— 1931 

Greensboro, Burlington, Salisbury, Spencer, E. Spencer, Graham, Gibsonville, Elon College, Randle- 
man, Stokesdale, Archdale, Trinity, Hamilton Lakes, Haw River, Jamestown, Summerfield, Guilford 
College, Pleasant Garden, Oakdale, Sumner, Sedgefield, Alamance, Efland, Whitsett, Brown Summit, 
Monticello, CUmax, Julian, Guilford Battleground, Brightwood, Glenwood, Edgeville, Hamilton, 
White Oak Heights, Hillsdale, Groomtown, Jessuptown, Guilquarry, McLeansville, Friendship, Po- 
mona, Terra Cotta, Guilford, Bessemer, Sedalia. 



OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— ALL DEPARTMENTS 




1930 


1931 




S 3,059,432.63 
1,927,044.72 


S 3,021,517.40 




1,986,727.94 







OPERATING 


REVENUE 


AND EXPENSES — DEPARTMENTS 






Greensboro 


High Point 


Burlington 


Salisbury 


^Yinston- 
Salem 


Electric: 

1930 Operating revenue 

1930 Operating expenses* .. 


81,041,638.09 

576,576.47 

1,051,535.85 

585,116.46 

290,849.35 
144,156.56 
261,433.68 
151,641.79 

99,166.97 
107,755.71 
175,380.52 
180,539.00 


-S 519,064.15 
386,642.14 
528,425.16 
406,888.65 

94,324.46 
41,322.58 
88,207.77 
43,358.34 

1,096.00 

1,072.36 

42,775.76 

40,496.10 


S 398,147.01 
251,835.73 
415,604.83 
257,260.06 

30,836.83 
16,636.49 
30,952.09 
18,759.58 


S 136,983.04 
102,985.15 
136,690.98 
107,712.56 

73,400.08 
43,907.43 
71,472.88 
46,466.99 

24,363.88 
31,542.79 
22,471.67 
32,206.93 




1931 Operating revenue 




1931 Operating expenses* 




Gas: 

1930 Operating revenue 

1930 Operating expenses* 

1931 Operating revenue.. 

1931 Operating expenses* 

Street Railway: 

1930 Operating revenue 


$ 212,847.95 
110,451.04 
196,566.21 
116,281.48 


1930 Operating expenses* 






1931 Operating revenue .. ... 






1931 Operating expenses* 













•Exclusive of taxes, etc. 



240 



N. C. Corporation Commission- 



electric STATISTICS 





Greensboro 


High Point 


Burlington 


Salisbury 


1930 Kwhrs received .-. . 


31,746,843 
26,593,471 
32,418,700 
26,788,000 


28,182,133 
26,519,009 
29,106,625 
26,820,186 


14,771,800 
12,647,472 
14,622,700 
12,805,439 


3,516,720 
2,769,249 
3,662,000 
3,093.179 




1931 Kwhrs received 


Kwhrs sold 





GAS STATISTICS— GREENSBOEO 



1930 



1931 



Coal gas benches, number 

Coal gas benches, capacity (M.C.F.) . 

Water gas sets, number 

Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.) 

Holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Coal gas produced (M.C.F.) 

Water gas produced (M.C.F.) 

Total gas produced (M.C.F.) 

Gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Gas sales (M.C.F.) 

Coal carbonized , tons 

Coal, average cost, per ton 

Oil used, gallons 

Oil, average cost 

Coke produced, tons 

Coke, average value 

Tar produced, gallons 

Tar, average value 

Mains, miles 

Customers, number. .: 



7 
420 

1 



223,513 

978 

50,245 

172,290 

12,795 

$5.28 

177,446 

.067 

8,604 



154,210 



99.03 
4,672 



7 

420 

1 

660 

302 

165,797 

26,564 

192,361 

917 

40,890 

150,554 

13,331 

$5,081 

77.450 

.063 

8.887 

$5.00 

159.960 

.015 

99.21 

4,570 



GAS STATISTICS— HIGH POINT 



1930 



1931 



Coal gas benches, number 

Coal gas benches, capacity (M.C.F.) . 

Water gas sets, number 

Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.) 

Holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Coal gas production (M.C.F.) 

Water gas production 

Total gas production (M.C.F.) 

Gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Gas sold (M.C.F.) 

Coal carbonized, tons 

Coal, average cost 

Oil used, gallons 

Oil, average cost 

Coke produced, tons 

Coke, average value 

Tar produced, gallons 

Tar, average value 

Mains, miles 

Customers, number 



1 
50 
125 



60,655 

746 

10,971 

48,9.38 

4,814 

$5.10 

530 



3,310 
57,603 



31.32 
1,468 



1 
50 

125 



57.' 



57,988 

769 

10,067 

47,152 

4,726 

S4.848 

450 

.079 

3,181 

$5.00 

58,603 

.015 

31.32 

1.416 



^sToKTH Carolina Public Service Compaxy 



241 



GAS STATISTICS— BURLINGTON 



Water gas sets, number 

Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.) 

Holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Gas produced, total 

Gas used by company (M.C.F. ).. 

Gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Gas sold (M.C.F.) 

Oil used, gallons 

Oil, average cost 

Mains, miles 

Customers, number 



1930 



1 


50 


90 


16,884 


404 


1,593 


14,887 


43.566 


18.20 


453 



1931 



1 
50 
90 

17,854 

447 

1,488 

15,919 

53,605 

.062 

26.20 

531 



GAS STATISTICS — SALISBURY 






1930 


1931 


Coal gas benches, number 


4 

240 

180 

47,083 

542 

9,207 

37,334 

3,783 

$5.15 

2,582 


4 




240 


Holder capacity (M.C.F.).. 

Coal gas produced (M.C.F.) 


180 
46,230 


Gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 


43 
8,853 


Gas sold (M.C.F.) 

Coal carbonized, tons. 


36,944 
3,731 


Coal, average cost 


$4,919 


Coke produced, tons 


2,500 


Coke, average value.. .. 


$5.00 


Tar produced, gallons . . ._ . . 


58,036 


37,310 


Tar, average value . 


.015 


Mains, miles .. . .. .. .. .. _. 


38.67 
1,468 


38.35 


Customers, number. .. . . . . .. 


1,426 







GAS STATISTICS— WINSTON-SALEM 





1930 


1931 


Coal gas benches, number 


6 
360 

1 
100 

275 


6 


Coal gas benches, capacity (M.C.F.) 


360 


Water gas sets, number 


1 


Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.) 


100 


Holder capacity (M.C.F.). 


275 


Coal gas produced (M.C.F.) 


138,242 

5,363 

143,605 


Water gas produced (M.C.F.) 




Total gas produced (M.C.F.) 


145,876 

73 

25,547 

120,256 

111,639 

$5.32 

25,782 

.0658 

7,592 


Gas used by company (M.C.F.).. 


53 


Gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 


28,808 


Gas sold (M.CF.) 


114,744 


Coal carbonized, tons 


11,424 
$5.04 


Coal, average cost 


Oil used, gallons 


18,756 
064 


Oil, average cost . _ .. 


Coke produced, tons 


7,615 
$5.00 


Coke, average value 


Tar produced, gallons 


139,536 


136 881 


Tar, average value 


.015 


Mains, miles „ 


96.16 
3,132 


96 38 


Customers, niunber _ 


3,057 



16 



242 



iST. C. Corporation Commission 



STREET RAILWAY STATISTICS— GREENSBORO 



1930 



1931 



Rotary converters, number 

Rotary converters, capacity, (K.W.). 

Kwhrs energy received 

Passengers carried 

Fare , average 

Cars operated, average 

Car hours operated 

Cars owned: 

Passenger 

Total 

Track, route miles 

Track, total miles 



Busses operated in connection with street railway: 

Busses owned 

Seating capacity .' 

Operated daily, number 

Seating capacity 

Length of route, miles 

Car miles operated 

Passengers carried 

Fare, average 



1 
1,000 
1,618.900 
1,725,444 



11 

552,095.88 



1,000 

1,514,300 

1,619,871 

.56 

11 

555,420.33 



11.90 


11.90 


12.65 


12.65 


12 


12 


272 


272 


11 


8 


242 


184 


20.9 


21.3 


535,226 


538,089 


,655,846 


1,603,695 


.07 


.05 



STREET RAILWAY STATISTICS— HIGH POINT 





1930 


1931 




1 
1,000 
6.64 
6.84 

7 

151 

6 

132 

6.8 

303,024 

668,676 

.07 


1 


Rotary converters, capacity (K.W.) 


1,000 
6.64 




6.84 


No railway cars operated. 

Busses Operated: 
Busses: 
Owned, number. _ . . ._ . 


7 


Owned, seating capacity 


151 




5 




111 




6.8 




33,645 




582,226 


Fare average 


.07 







STREET RAILWAY 


STATISTICS— SALISBURY 






1930 


1931 




1 

1,000 

356,290 

369,363 

3 

19,983 

157,310.93 

8 

8 

6.86 

7.16 


1 




1,000 


Kwhrs received 


352,200 


Passengers carried 


285,447 


Cars operated, average number . . 


3 


Car hours operated .-. .. 


18,522 


Car miles operated . . . . _..._ . 


156,987.26 




8 




8 




6.86 


Track, total miles..- .. ... 


7.16 


Fare, average 


.07 



JS'oRTH Carolina Public Service Company 

BALANCE SHEET— 1930 



243 



Balance 

December 31, 

1930 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1930 



Fixed Capital 

Change 

Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Prepayments 

Change 

Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Miscellaneous Investments 

Change 

Miscellaneous Special Funds 

Change 

Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Change 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Adjustment Accounts: 

Treasiiry Securities — Bonds 

Change 

Total 

Change 



$12,456,175.96 
245,286.74 



53,652.09 
21,032.87* 
125.00 
810.00* 
422,484.48 
38,466.10* 



167,097.75 
16,256.03* 
15,503.32 
6,265.21 



2,604.00 
544.45 
525.27* 

9,085.00 
50.00* 



440,265.44 
17,158.87* 
2,891.19 



1,580,300.00 
4,400.00 



$15,150,728.68 
161.652.81 



Capital Stock 

Long Term Debt 

Change 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change. 

Dividends Declared 

Miscellaneous Current Liabilities. 
Change 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities. 
Change 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Contributions to Extensions 

Change 

Contingency Reserve 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Profit and Loss— Surplus .-. 

Change... 

Total 

Change 



$ 565,083.03 

8,016,900.00 

121,700.00* 



127,738.36 

23,041.88 

80,676.40 

314.27 

2,939.11 

,238,479.46 

208,375.06 



106,833.71 
12,703.11 
31,995.00 

1,576.25* 
13,135.31 

5,090.89* 



590 

131 

11 

2 

193 

48 

,123 
375 



441.78 
403.50 
009.96 
072.52 
197.86 
19.70 
607.48 
936.56 
686.22 
860.35 



$15,150,728.68 
161,652.81 



*Decrease. 



244 



X. C. Corporation Commission 

BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



Assets 



Fixed Capital. 
Change. 



Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable. 
Change 



Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Prepayments 

Change 



Miscellaneous Assets: 
Miscellaneous Investments.. - 

Change 

Sinking Funds 

Miscellaneous Special Funds. 
Change 



Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense. 

Change 

Jobbing Accounts 

Change... 



Adjustment Accounts: 

Treasury Securities 

Change... 



Total... 
Change. 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



$12,703,820.34 
247,644.38 



1.87 
).22* 



125.00* 

519,553.27 

97,068.79 



153,026.64 
14,071.11* 

8,775.96 
6,727.36* 



3,661.00 
1,057.00 

544.45 
8,465.28 

619.72* 



422,996.97 
17,268.47* 
597.00 
597.00 



1,605,900.00 
25,600.00 



$15,466,332.78 
315,604.10 



Liabilities 



Capital Stock 

Long Term Debt - 

Change 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Dividends Declared 

Miscellaneous Current Liabilities. 
Change 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities 

Change 

Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change.. 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve. 

Change... 

Contributions to Extensions 

Change 

Contingency Reserve 

Change — 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Profit and Loss — Surplus 

Change 

Total 

Change 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



$ 565,088.03 
7,895,800.00 
121,100.00* 



141,354.70 

13,616.34 

82,517.64 

1,841.24 

2,939,11 

144,976.73 

28,502.73* 



41,479.45 

65,354.26* 

30,173.75 

1,821.25* 

7,296.01 

5,839.30* 

4,137,500.00 

72,500.00 



780, 

190, 

19, 

8, 

195, 

1, 

49, 

1,371, 
248, 



650.38 
208.60 
483.88 
473.92 
180.39 
982.53 
981.63 
374.15 
911.08 
224.86 



115,466,332.78 
315,604.10 



*Decrease. 



Piedmont Utilities Company 



245 



PIEDMONT UTILITIES COMPANY 

Organized November 20, 1928. 

Main office: Hickory, N. C. 

Officers: President, J. V. Nichols, Purcivile, Va.; Secretary-Treasurer, 1930, S. F. Abernethy, Hick 
ory; Secretary, 1931, John McGill, Jr., Washington, D. C; Treasurer, 1931, W. R. Weaver, Hickory. 

Gas plant operated at Hickory. 

OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 





1930 


1931 




$ 


39,586.63 
34,980.16 


$ 


36,928.08 




68,006.30 






STATISTICS 



Water gas sets, number 

Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.). 

Holder capacity (M.C.F,) 

Gas manufactured (M.C.F.) 

Gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.).. 
Gas used by company (M.C.F.)... 

Gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Oil used, gallons 

Oil, cost 

Tar produced, gallons 

Tar, average value, gallon 

Mains, miles 

Customers, number 



25,712 

382 

3,360 

44,355 

.065 




28,231 

22,937 

560 

4,734 

51,166 

.06 

6,000 

.03 

59 

573 



BALANCE SHEET— 1930 



Assets 


Balance 

December 31, 

1930 


Liabilities 


Balance 

December 31, 

1930 


Fixed Capital 


$ 278,233.99 

492.62* 
24,175.79 

11,823.98 
2.000.00 

3,830.00 
287.50 


Capital Stock 


$ 165,650.00 




Long Term Debt 


38,500.00 


CuRKENT Assets: 

Cash 


Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable. 




Accounts Receivable _. 


88,155.36 






28,282.14 


Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 
Material and Supplies 


Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued ... 


2,818,78 


Sinking Funds 


Interest Accrued . 


2,624.93* 


Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 


Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities. 

Reserves : 

Casualty and Insvirance Reserves- 


733.63* 
356.01* 




166.93 




Total 




Total . .. 


$ 319,858.64 


$ 319,858 64 









*Decrease. 



246 



]^. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSIOI^ 
BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



Assets 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Fixed Capital. 
Change 



CuEEENT Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Accounts Receivable. 
Change 



$ 277,884.34 
349.65* 



794.85 
1,287.47 
15,287.86 
8,887.93* 



Capital Stock 

Change 

Long Term Debt- 
Change 



Inventoeies and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Sinking Funds... 

Change... 



7,115.06 
4,708.92* 



Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense. 

Change 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Change 



2,000.00* 



3,807.50 
22.50* 



Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Change 

Accounts Payable 

Change. _. 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Notes Payable to Stockholders- 
Change 

Loans from Stockholders 

Change 



$ 173,650.00 
8,000.00 
60,000.00 
21,500.00 



49,012.68 

39,142.68* 

6,671.55 

21,610.59* 

32.00 

32.00 

33,802.60 

33,802.60 

15,900.00 

15,900.00 



Adjustment Accounts : 

Prepaid Insurance 

Change 



287.50* 



402.82 
402.82 



Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change.. 

Interest Accrued ... 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities. 
Change. 



2,818.78* 



,624.93 
507.35 
,240.98 



Reserves: 

Casualty and Insurance Reserves 

Change. 

Profit and Loss— Surplus 

Change 



34 



356.01* 
,283.75* 
,450.68* 



TotaL-.. 
Change. 



$ 305,292.43 
14,566.21* 



Total.... 
Change- 



$ 305,292.43 
14,566.21* 



*In red. 



RALEIGH GAS COMPANY 



Incorporated October 12, 1929, under the Laws of North Carolina. 

Main oflBce: Raleigh. 

Officers (1930-31): President, A. E. Peirce, Chicago; Vice President, W. H. Wildes, Chicago; Secre- 
tary, W. M. McFarland, Chicago; Treasurer, W. S. McCuUough, Chicago. 

City in which gas plant is operated: Raleigh. 





OPERATING REVENUE AND 


EXPENSES 








1930 


1931 


Operating revenue _. ... - -.- . -.- ..... 


$ 279,125.08 
161,342.98 


$ 


263,999.36 


Operating expenses* .... .. 


142,480.98 







*Excluding uncoUectibles, taxes, etc. 



Raleigh Gas Company 



247 



GAS STATISTICS— RALEIGH 



1930 



1931 



I 



Coal gas benches, number 

Coal gas benches, capacity (M.C.F.) 

Water gas sets, number 

Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.) 

Holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Coal gas produced (M.C.F.) 

Water gas produced (M.C.F.) 

Gas produced, total (M.C.F.) 

Gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Gas sales (M.C.F.) 

Coal carbonized, tons 

Coal, average cost 

Oil used, gallons 

Oil, average cost 

Coke produced, tons 

Coke, average value 

Tar produced, gallons 

Tar, average value 

Mains, miles 

Customers, number 



8 

800 

1 

200 

1,000 



214,469.3 

329.3 

47,167.5 

163,457.1 

16,692.2 

$5.35 

59,450 

.066 

10,049.85 



227,125 



79.404 
4,232 



720 

1 

400 

1,000 

195,122.2 

9,082.5 

204,204.7 

526.4 

45,645 

158,033.3 

16,395.64 

$5.04 

36,093 

.062 

9,379.10 

84.56 

231,461 

.04 

94.047 

3,994 



BALANCE SHEET— 1930 



Assets 


Balance 

December 31, 

1930 


Liabilities 


Balance 

December 31, 

1930 


Fixed Capital . 


$ 2,271,732.05 
140,299.29 

4,344.55 

3,041.25* 

61,808.90 

80,969.72* 


Capital Stock 


$ 2,232 500 00 


Change 

CuKBENT Assets: 
Cash 


Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 


100,000.00 




Change 


100,000.00 




Accounts Payable 


26,720.26 




Change. 


23,086.48* 


Interest and Dividends Receivable 


Consumers' Deposits 


27,164.03 




487.50* 

34,134.69 
3,521.51 
10,516.42 
536.56* 

196,984.44 
196,984.44 


Change . 


141.59 


Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 


Accrued Liabilities: 
Taxes Accrued _ . 


2,965 91 


Material and Supplies 


Change . . . 


2,965 91 


Change . . 


Interest Accrued. .— . . 






1,124 90 




Change ______ _. 






1,124.90 




Advances to Affiliated Companies 




Miscellaneous Assets: 


162,355.84 
162,355 84 


Investments in AflBliated Corn- 


Reserves: 




Change _. 


5,165.24 
5,165.24 


Suspense: 


Change 


Clearing and Apportionment Ac- 


Miscellaneous Reserves 


7,392.05 


counts 


Change 


1,099.61 
14,157 82 


Change 


4.439.17* 
25.00 
144.48* 




Miscellaneous Suspense 




4,376.93 


Change 


Total 








Total 


$ 2,579,546.05 
244,143.54 


$ 2,579,546.05 
244,143.54 


Change 









^Decrease. 



248 



I^. C. Corporation Commission 

BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



Assets 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Fixed Capital. 
Change 



CxJERENT Assets: 

Cash - 

Change 

Accounts Receivable. 
Change.. 



Inventories anb Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies. 

Change 

Prepayments 

Change. 

Miscellaneous Current Assets 

Change 



Com- 



MlSCELLANEOUS AsSETS: 

Investments in Affiliatec 
panics 

Change 

Clearing and Apportionment Ac- 
counts. 

Change 

Work in Progress 

Change 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Change 



$ 1,276,887.39 
994,844.66* 



11,217.17 
6,872.62 

65,309.86 
3,500.96 



27,593.55 

6,541.14* 

7,919.60 

2,596.82* 

54.33 

54.33 



30,455.36 
166,529.08* 

555.08 

555.08 

16,528.55 

16,528.55 



25.00* 



Total.-.. 
Change. 



$ 1,436,520.89 
1,143,025.16* 



Capital Stock. 
Change. 



$ 1,063,095.00 
1,169,405.00* 



Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Change. 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits... 
Change 



Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 



Advances to AflSIiated Companies 
Change... 



Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Profit and Loss— Surplus. 
Change 



100,000.00 

5,163.87 

21,556.39* 

28,090.02 

925.99 



17,313.55 

14,347.64 

1,290.67 

165.77 

65,672.86 
96,682.98* 



168,608.71 

163,443.47 

8,828.85 

1,436.80 

78,457.36 

64,299.54 



Total.-., 
Change. 



$ 1,436,520.89 
1,143,025.16* 



"Decrease. 



SOUTHERN PUBLIC UTILITIES COMPANY 

Incorporated March, 1913, under the Laws of Maine. 
Main oflBce: Charlotte, N. C. 
OflEcers (1930-31): President, E. C. Marshall, Charlotte; Vice-Presidents, A. V. Harrill, R. L. Peter 
Iran, J. P. Lucas, Charlotte; Secretary, W. C. Parker, New York; Treasurer, D. G. Calder, Charlotte 

TOWNS AND CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTRICITY, RETAIL 

1930: Charlotte, Winston-Salem, Thomasville, Belmont, Mount Holly, China Grove, Bessemer City 
Hickory, Reidsville, Matthews, Salisbury, Rockwell, Icard, Hildebran, Connelly Springs, Rutherford 
College, Grover, Mount Airy, Elkin, Norwood, Spencer, East Spencer, Kernersville, Marshville, Cleve- 
land, Cooleemee, Indian Trail, Wingate, Taylorsville, King, Pinnacle, Rural Hall, North Wilkesboro, 
Wilkesboro, Denton, Hiddenite, New London, Madison, Stoneville, Troutman, Conover, Ronda, 
Hendersonville, Tuxedo, Saluda, Tryon, Columbus, Mill Springs, Midway, Mount Pleasant, Walnut 
Cove, Waxhaw, Stanley, Goodsonville, Gastonia, Mooresville,Claremont, Pilot Mountain, Mocksville, 
Valdese, Catawba, Ellenboro, Brevard, Mooresboro, Lattimore, Harmony, Boiling Springs, Marion, 
Old Fort, Yadkin County, Welcome, Hillsboro, Oakboro. 

1931: Additions: Spindale, Rutherfordton, Shelby, Leaksville-Spray. Eliminations: Reidsville, 
Catawba. 



SouTHEEN Public Utilities Company 



249 



CITIES SERVED WITH GAS 

1930: Charlotte, Mount Airy, N. C. 

1931: Charlotte, Mount Airy, N. C; Chester, Greenville, Spartanburg, S. C. 

CITIES IN WHICH STREET RAILWAYS OPERATED 

1930: Charlotte, Winston-Salem . 

1931: Charlotte, Winston-Salem, N. C; Greenville, Anderson, Spartanburg, S. C. 



OPERATING REVENUE AND 


EXPENSES 






1930 


1931 


All Divisions: 
Operating revenue 


$ 9,811,698.17 
7,221,375.19 

7,886,013.67 
5,374,767.07 

5,096,454.25 
3,449,348.75 

549,605.21 
2,290.62 


$ 10,112,314.52 


Operating expenses* 


7,325,799.82 


Electric Division: 
Operating revenue.. 


8,213,134.82 


Operating expenses* 


4,781,735.93 


Electric Division — North Carolina only. 


5,321,493.97 




3,572,476.69 


Gas Division: 
Charlotte: Operating revenue .._ . 


525,788.19 




4,437.08 






Total-... 


$ 551,895.83 

310,627.16 

3,292.46 


S 530,225.27 


Charlotte: Operating expenses 


287,851.81 


Mount Airy: Operating expenses* . . ... 


10,390.14 






TotaL 


« 313,919.62 


$ 298,241 95 


South Carolina cities: Spartanburg, Greenville, Anderson: 
Operating revenue . . 


338,969.28 


Operating expenses* 




294,837.07 


Street Railways: 


495,603.23 
134,851.14 


432,055.86 


Winston-Salem: Operating revenue 


200,311.10 






Total 


$ 630,454.37 
465,003.01 
187,343.05 


$ 632,366.96 


Charlotte: Operating expenses* . 


441,612.17 


Winston-Salem: Operating expenses* 


271,619.33 






Total 


$ 652,346.06 


$ 713,231.50 
255,905 11 


South Carolina Cities: 
Operating revenue ... 


Operating expenses* . . 




327 171 54 


Water Division: 
Entire operating revenue 




141,713.08 


Entire operating expenses* 




84,761.64 


North Carolina: 
Operating revenue . 




26,040.99 


Operating expenses* 




17,477.38 









"Exclusive of taxes, etc. 



250 



E". C. Corporation Commission 

BALANCE SHEET — 1930 



Assets 



Balance 
December 31, 



Liabilities 



Balance 
December 31, 



Fixed Capital... 

Change 

CuRHENT Assets: 

Cash 

Change _. 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change- 

Interest and Dividends Receivable 
Change. 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change... 

Prepayments 

Change.. 

Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Miscellaneous Investments 

Change. 

Sinking Funds 

Change 

Replacement Funds 

Change 

Miscellaneous Special Funds 

Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Change 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Change 

Adjustment Acxjgunts: 

Reacquired Securities— Bonds 

Change 

Total 

Change 

*Decrease. 



$38,289,191.16 
1,605,795.46 



2,483,593.09 

1,636,054.59 

1,223.86 

6,050.00* 

5,684,933.97 

160,442.19* 

212.00 

14,114. §2* 



610,813.49 

22,565.87* 

18,504.41 

2,739.88* 



2,276,846.70 
61,422.06 
1,031,412.86 
22,794.82 
13,085.19 
32,798,53 
1,792.85 
3,478.88 



510,315.47 
40.825.20* 
246,862.50 
127,686.65* 



26,817.50 
4,160.90* 



$50,269,808.44 
1,820,559.84 



Capital Stock 

Long Term Debt- 
Change 



Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Change 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Dividends Declared 

Miscellaneous Current Liabilities. 
Change 



Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change. 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities. 
Change 



Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change... 

Casualty and Insurance Reserves 

Change 

Profit and Loss — Surplus 

Change 



$21,000,000.00 

17,569,000.00 

11,000.00* 



44,000.00 

500.00* 

560,2.32.26 

47,932.82 
319,223.76 

23,929.06 
315,000.00 

54,842.23 

19,479.33* 



374.977.26 
16,032.82* 
133,465.82 
122,014.84 
23,649.27 
23,649.27 



7,182,495.91 
1,136,300.67 

965,457.36 

99,238.55 

1,727,464.57 

414,506.78 



Total..-. 
Change. 



$50,269,808.44 
1,820,559.84 



SouTHEEN Public Utilities Company 

BALANCE SHEET — 1931 



251 



Assets 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Liabilities 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



Fixed Capital 

Change 

CuKRENT Assets: 

Cash 

Change.. 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Acco unts Receivable 

Change 

Interest and Dividends Receivable 

Change 

Marketable Securities 

Change 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Prepayments. 

Change 

Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies -..-- 

Change... 

Miscellaneous Investments 

Change. 

Sinking Funds 

Change 

Miscellaneous Special Funds 

Change .. 

Special Deposits 

Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Change 

Clearing and Apportionment Ac- 
counts. 

Change 

Work in Progress 

Change. 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Change 

Adjustment Accounts: 
Reacquired Securities— Bonds 

TotaL.. 

Change 

*Decrease. 



$40,242,515.85 
1,953,324.69 



1,622,291.86 

861,301.23* 

5,557.24 

4,333.38 

1,727,817.13 

160,333.81 

6,134.59 

5,922.59 

771,893.24 

771,893.24 

554,282.12 

56,531.37* 

26,664.06 

8,159.65 



,467,553.98 

73,256.63 

10,711.00 

50,711.06* 

7,627.94 

15,166.88* 

35,044.64 

2,246.11 

3,478.88 



469,490.27 
40,825.20* 

11.65* 

11.65* 

95,815.43 

129,333.94* 

10,771.96 

10,941.17* 



26,817.50 



$52,084,456.04 
1,814,647.60 



Capital Stock 

Long Term Debt - 

Change 

CuRKENT Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Change 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Dividends Declared 

Miscellaneous Current Liabilities- 
Change 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change. 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Advances to Affiliated Companies 
Change.. 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Casualty and Insurance Reserves. 

Change 

Contributions to Extensions 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Profit and Loss— Surplus 

Change 



$21,000,000.00 
17,541,000.00 
28,000.00* 



400,000.00 
356,000.00 
367,187.51 

59,644.75* 
345,539.96 

26,316.20 
315,000.00 

59,420.01 
4,577.78 



321,414.57 
53,562.69 

146,274.86 
12,809.04 

140,000.00 
54,000.00 



8,407,941.44 

1,225,445.53 

1,040,353.48 

80,896.12 

44,466.09 

20,816.82 

47,400.00 

1,902,4.58.12 

174,993.-55 



Total..-. 
Change. 



$52,084,456.04 
1,814,647.60 



252 



JN". C. Corporation Commission 

STATISTICS— STREET RAILWAY— CHARLOTTE 



1930 



1931 



Rotary converters, number 

Rotary converters, capacity (K.W. 

Kwhrs received. 

Passengers carried, number 

Cars operated, average number... 

Car miles operated 

Cars owned: 



Freight and express. 

Total.. 

Track, route miles 

Track, total miles 

Fare, average 



4 


4 


1,850 


1,900 


5,481,697 


5,538,555 


7,649,106 


6,641,622 


36 


36 


2,005,005 


2,060,523 


47 


51 


5 


5 


52 


56 


39.10 


25.188 


48.90 


35.288 




.06467 



No busses operated in connection with railway. 

STATISTICS— STREET RAILWAY— WINSTON-SALEM 



1930 



1931 



Rotary converters, number 

Rotary converters, capacity (K.W.), 

Passengers carried, number 

Cars operated, average number 

Car miles operated 

Cars owned: 

Passenger 

Freight and express 

Total 

Track, route miles 

Track, total miles 

Fare, average 



2 

1,000 

2,062,243 

18 

722,445 


31 
3 

34 

9.114 

10.049 



Busses operated in connection with railway: 

Busses, owned 

Busses, seating capacity 

Busses, operated, number 

Busses operated, seating capacity 

Length of route, miles 

Car miles operated 

Passengers carried 

Fare, average 




2 

1,000 

1,892,133 

16 

729,189 

31 
3 

34 

9.114 

10.049 

.065 



18 

366 

13 

276 

22 

470,250 

1,221,234 

.06233 



STATISTICS- 


-GAS--CHARLOTTE 






1930 


1931 




8 

800 

3 

1,300 

940 

187,153 

163,390 


8 


Coal gas benches, capacity (M.C.F.) 


800 


Water gas sets, number _ 


3 


Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.) . . .. . 


1,660 




940 


Coal gas produced (M.C F.) 


211,199 


Water gas produced (M.C.F.) 


126,011 



Southern Public Utilities Compa:s'Y 



253 





1930 


1931 


Total gas produced (M.C.F.) 

Gas used by the company 


350,543 


337,210 
455 


Gas unaccounted for 


23,443 

327,100 

13,642 


28,213 


Gas sold 


308,542 


Coal carbonized, tons 


17,810 


Coal, average cost 


$4.75 


Oil used, gallons . - - . . 


509,633 


378,353 


Oil, average cost ._ - .. .. .. -.---. 


.0556 


Coke produced, tons. . ... . . .. .. 


8,791 


12,072 




$4.00 






207,223 






.02 




90.75 
7,187 


92.47 




7,000 







STATISTICS— GAS — MOUNT AIRY 





1930 


1931 


Butane vapor 






Gas produced . . 


770.7 

54.4 

496 

220.3 

5,545 

7.5 

54 


3,271.1 


Gas used by company. 


262 


Gas unaccounted for . 


442 


Gas sold. 


2,567 


Butane used, gallons 




Mains, miles. 


7.5 


Custom.ers, number 


106 







STATISTICS— GAS— SOUTH CAROLINA CITIES COMBINED— 1931 



Coal gas benches, number ■ 15 

Coal gas benches, capacity (M.C.F.) 1,060 

Water gas sets, number 2 

Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.) 838 

Holder capacity (M.C.F.) 605 

Coal gas produced (M.C.F.) 1 272,785 

Water gas produced (M.C.F.) 1,886 

Butane gas produced (M.C.F.) ' 1,247 

Total gas produced (M.C.F.) 275,918 

Used by company (M.C.F.) 294 

Gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 85,197 

Gas sold (M.C.F.) 190,427 

Coal carbonized, tons 19,615 

Coal, average cost $4.36 

Oil used, gallons 16,715 

Oil, average cost .0644 

Coke produced, tons 15,165 

Coke, average value $4.00 

Tar produced, gallons 252,416 

Tar, average value ,02 

Mains, miles 122.72 

Customers, number 5, 460 



254 ^v". C. Corporation Commission 



TIDE WATER POWER COMPANY 

Incorporated February 26, 1907, under the Laws of North Carolina. 

Main office: Wilmington, N. C. 

Officers (1930-31): President, A. W. Higgins, Alexandria, Va.; Vice-President, F. A. Maathes, Wil- 
mington; Secretary- Treasurer, L. D. Latta, Wilmington. 

CITIES AND TOWNS SERVED WITH ELECTRICITY— WHOLESALE 

1931: Hookerton, Newport. 

CITIES AND TOWNS SERVED WITH ELECTRICITY — RETAIL 

1930: Abbottsburg, Acme, Alliance, Arapahoe, Ashton, Atkinson, Audubon, Bayboro, Belgrade, 
Beulaville, Bolton, Bowdens, Bridgeton, Brunswick, Burgaw, Calypso, Carolina Beach, Cash Corner, 
Castle Hayne, Catherine I>ake, Cerro Gordo, Chadbourn, Charity Crossing, Chinquapin, Cove, Clark- 
ton, Currie, Deep Run, Delco, Delgado, Dover, Dublin, Eagle Island, East Wilmington, Elizabethtown , 
Evergreen, FairbluiT, Faison, Forest Hills, Freeman, Garden City, Garland, Graingers, Grantsboro , 
Grifton, Hallsboro, Hallsville, Ingold, Jacksonville, James City, Jason, Kellum, Kenansville, Lake 
Waccamaw, Leland, Long Creek, Maco, Magnolia, Masonboro, Maysville, Mount Tabor, Navassa, 
Oleander, Oriental, Pink Hill, Pollocksville, Red Bug, Reelsboro, Richlands, Rocky Point, Rooks , 
Rose Hill, St. Helena, Seagate, Seven Springs, Shore Acres, Stonewall, Sunset Park, Swanboro, Teach- 
eys, Trenton, Turkey, Vandemere, Vineland, Wallace, Wananish, Warsaw, Watha, White Lake, White- 
ville, Willard, Wilmington, Wilmington Beach, Winter Park, Winter Park Gardens, Woodburn, Wrights- 
boro, Wrightsville, Wrightsville Beach. 

1931: Additions: Armour, Beaufort, Caswell, Claybrick, Harbor Island, Hubert Institute, More- 
head City, Silverdale, Snow Hill, Wildwood. Eliminations: Forest Hills, Shore Acres. 



CITIES SERVED WITH GAS 

1930: Wilmington, Wrightsville Beach, 

1931: Wilmington, Wrightsville Beach, Fayetteville, Goldsboro, Washington, New Bern, Kinston. 
(Greenville part of year. Sold to Greenville.) 

STREET RAILWAYS 

Wilmington, Wrightsville Beach. 

CITIES AND TOWNS SERVED WITH WATER — 1931 

Snow Hill, Beaufort, Morehead City. 



Tide Water Power Company 



255 



OPERATING REVENUE AND 


EXPENSES 






1930 


1931 


All Divisions: 
Operating revenue 


1 1,382,757.78 
674,017.19 

979,949.50 
427,590.75 

220,258.18 


$ 1,499,705.81 




752,169.84 


Electric Division: 


985,862.10 


Operating expenses*-. 


438,833.39 


Gas Division: 
Operating revenue: 
Wilmington -. . 


215,225.65 


Fayetteville. ... 


28,961.61 


Goldsboro .. 




29,885.30 


Kinston . 




26,745.16 


Greenville . 




8,744.03 


Washington 




22,220.77 


New Bern. 




20,344.65 


Total .- - 


220,258.18 
107,087.66 


352,127.17 


Operating expenses:* 
Wilmington . . .. . . 


106,919.75 


Fayetteville .. _ .. .. 


17,153.41 


Goldsboro . . 




21,004.69 






16,024.91 


Greenville . 




7,625.91 






14,493.32 


New Bern 




14,370.25 


Total 


107,087.66 

178,749.98 
134,785.85 


197,592.24 


Street Railway Division: 
Operating revenue 


155,962.10 


Operating expenses* ... . . .- 


112,236.90 


Water Division: 
Operating revenue. 


5,754.44 


Operating expenses* .. 




3,580.84 









*Exclusive of taxes, etc. 



STATISTICS— ELECTRIC 





1930 


1931 


Plants, capacity: 
Hydro 



11,500 





Steam 


13,080 


Current: 
Generated: 
Hydro 




Steam 


21,897,100 

21,897,100 
9,047,550 

30,944,650 
2,247,620 
6,486,077 

22,210,953 
12,572 


21,869,970 


Total 


21,869,970 


Purchased — 


10,745,062 
32 615,032 


Total - 


Used by company _ 


3,503,306 


Unaccounted for . . 


5,927,940 


Sold 


23,183,786 


Ciistomers , number 


14,392 







256 



X. C. Corporation Commission- 
statistics— gas— Wilmington 



1930 



1931 



Coal gas benches, number 

Coal gas benches, capacity (M.C.F.). 

Water gas sets, number 

Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.) 

Holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Coal gas produced (M.C.F.) 

Water gas produced (M.C.F.) 

Total gas produced (M.C.F.) 

Used by company (M.C.F.) 

Gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

G as sales 

Coal carbonized, tons 

Coal, average cost 

Oil used, gallons 

Oil, average cost 

Coke produced, tons 

Coke, average value 

Tar produced, gallons 

Tar, average value 

Mains, miles 

Customers, number 



18 

200 

2 

1,500 

270 

70,302 

66,888 

137,190 

2,580.8 

12,926.4 

121,682.8 

5,898.2 



226,354 
3,910.3 



65,734 



72.69 
3,522 



3 

200 

2 

800 

270 

78,309 

54,530 

132,839 

2,729.2 

9,928.5 

120,181.3 

6,491.7 

15.50 

187,530 

.058 

4,293.8 

$5.50 

72,759 

.02 

72.52 

3.578 



STATISTICS — GAS — 1931 





Fayetteville 


Goldsboro 


Kinston 


Water gas sets, number 


2 

400 

70 

16,054.4 

52.2 

2,022.7 

13,970.5 

44,460 

.058 

3,498 

.02 

23.57 

689 


2 

400 

130 

21,066.1 

74.7 

5,680.6 

15,310.8 

61,033 

.058 

2,148 

.02 

9.68 

794 


1 


Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.)- . 


400 


Holder capacity (M.C.F.) - 


115 


Water gas produced (M.C.F.) - 


19,641.3 
98.2 




4,110.7 


Gas sales (M C.F.) 


15,432.4 




56,696 


Oil, average cost 


.057 


Tar produced, gallons 


4,955 


Tar, average value 


.02 


Mains, miles - - 


15.50 


Customers, number . . .. . 


686 








Washington 


New Bern 


Greenville 




2 

300 

57 

14,181.3 

98.8 

3,237 

10,845.5 

41,064 

.056 

3,570 

.02 

13.85 

610 


2 

300 

45 

11.709.3 

77.7 

1,972 

9,659.6 

34,599 

.058 

2,685 

.02 

14.99 

598 


1 


Water gas sets, capacity (M.C.F.) 


300 


Holder capacity (M.C.F.) 


50 


Water gas produced (M.C.F.). 


7,259 
65.9 




2,556.4 


Gas sales (M.C.F. )_ 


4,636.7 




20,519 


Oil, average cost 


.058 


Tar produced, gallons 


1,266 


Tar, average value _ 


.02 






Customers number 









Tide Water Power Company 
statistics — street railway 



257 



Rotary converters, number 

Rotary converters, capacity (K.W.) 

Kwhrs received 

Passengers carried, number 

Cars, average number operated - 

Car miles operated -. 

Cars owned: 

Passenger 

Freight and express 

Total 

Track, route miles 

Track total 

Busses operated in connection with railway 

Number owned 

Seating capacity 

Number operated, average daily 

Seating capacity 

Car miles operated 

Passengers carried, number 

Fare, average 



1930 



1931 



4 


4 


1,600 


1,600 


818,136 


1.639.900 


076,374 


1,508,686 


21 


18 


786. 168 


711,797 


33 


33 


14 


6 


47 


39 


21.40 


21.40 


32.53 


32.53 


2 


2 


36 


. 36 


1 


1 


18 


18 


43.973 


42,630 


42,954 


39,645 



STATISTICS— WATER — 1931 



Supply: Deep wells: 

Wells, number.. 

Storage capacity ,. 

Electric energy used (K.W.H.). 

Water sold, gallons 

Customers, number 



280,000 

36,652 

7.471,300 

1.250 



258 



N. C. GoKPORATioN Commission 

BALANCE SHEET— 1930 



Balance 

December 31, 

1930 



Liabilities 



Balance 
December 31, 



Fixed Capital 

Change 

CuBRENT Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable. 

Change 

Interest and Dividends Receivable 
Change 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Prepayments 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Assets 

Change 

Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Change 

Miscellaneous Investments - . 

Change — 

Sppcial Deposits 

Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Change 

Jobbing Accounts 

Change 

Clearing and Apportionment Ac- 
counts - 

Change 

Work in Progress 

Change 

Miscell aneous Suspense 

Change 

Adjustment Accounts: 

Treasury Securities 

Change 

Total 

Change , 



$8 



924,908.61 
266,964.50 



46,696.58 
12,290.34* 
8,078.35 
4,929.82 
204,610.13 
30,585.36 
73.97 
10,911.04* 



157,364.62 
18,046.97 
9,728.20 
9,033.12 
18,702.25 
18,113.89 



13,732.64 

923,790.29* 

136,387.39 

3,932.64 

25.00 



535,810.12 
10,701.18 
7,695.48 
3,032.80 

173.14* 
173.14* 
12,760.07 
14,390.90 
12,977.93 
13,772.75 



930,000.00 
930,000.00 



Capital Stock 

Change 

Capital Stock Subscribed- 

Change 

Long Term Debt 



Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Change 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Liabilities. 
Change 



Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities. 

Change 

Advances to AflBliated Companies 
Change 



Reserves: 

Retirement Reservel 

Change 

Casualty and Insurance Reserves. 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Miscellaneous Unadjusted Credits 

Change 

Profit and Loss— Surplus 

Change 



$4,103,996.76 

68, 383.12 

24,087.00 

24,087.00 

5,300,000.00 



21,530.00 
3,300.00 
91,622.92 
2,925.57 
57,513.91 

659.04* 
5,751.27 
20. J7* 



72,447.94 

35,881.93 

111,147.84 

18.99 

7,000.00 

5,000.00* 

231,937.50 

231,937.50 



809,590.44 

25,908.76 

14,218.65 

8,777.65* 

27,920.27 

1,340.25* 

3,449.82 

3,441.05 

137,163.88 

31,356.63 



$11,019,378.20 
353,109.90 



TotaL... 
Change. 



$11,D19,378.20 
355,109.90 



^Decrease. 



itT)iE Wategr Power Company 

BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



259 



Assets 



Fi*ed Capital- 
Change 



Current Assets: 

Cash-— 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change -- 

Interest and Dividends Receivable 
Change 



Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies ..- 

Change 

Prepayments 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Assets 

Change. - 



MlSCELLuVNEOUS AsSETs: 

Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Change - 

Miscellaneous Investments 

Change 

Special Deposits 



Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Change 

Jobbing Accounts 

Change - - 

Clearing and Apportionment Ac- 
counts 

Change 

Work in Progress 

Change -.. 

Miscellaneous Suspense. 

Change - 



Adjustment Accounts: 
Reacquired Securities. -. 
Chahgd 



Total—. 
Chafige. 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



$11,120,544.05 
2,195,635.44 



93,813.29 

47,116.71 

616,379.44 

608,301.09 

255,561.26 

50,951.13 

17,282.63 

17,208.66 



119,168.49 
38,196.13* 
7,583.22 
2,144.98* 
170,711.24 
152,008.95 



19,982.64 

6,250.00 

140,115.20 

3,727.81 

25.00 



658,593.94 
129,446.07 
545.53 
7,149.95* 

1,653.62* 
1,493.92* 
23,413.99 
10,653.92 
14,299.81 
5,326.93* 



930,000.00* 



S13, 256,366. 11 
2,236,987.91 



Liabilities 



Capital Stock 

Capital Stock Subscribed. 

Change 

Long Term Debt- 

Change.-. 

Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Change 

Accounts Payable 

Change.. 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Dividends Declared 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Liabilities. 
Change. _ _ 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change. 

Casualty and Insurance Reserves. 

Change. 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change.. 

Miscellaneous Unadjusted Credits 

Change „ . 

Profit and Loss— Surplus 

Change. 

Capital Surplus 

Change 



Total... 
Change. 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



$4,103,996.7t> 

142,568.00 

118,481.00 

6,300,000.00 

1.000,000.00 



130.00 
595.77 
686.99 
953.18* 
978.18 
464.27 
015.96 
015.96 
499.62 
167.67* 



135,128.20 
62,680.26 

132,126.93 
20,979.09 



1,055, 

245, 

10, 

3. 



197.53 
607.09 
612.10 
606.55* 
,792.19 
871.92 
,231.34 
,781.52 
,333.09 
,169.21 
,069.22 
,069.22 



$13,256,366.11 
2,236,987.91 



* Deer ease. 



260 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



VIRGINIA ELECTRIC AND POWER COMPANY 

Incorporated June 29, 1909, under the Laws of Virginia. 

Main office: Richmond, Va. 

Officers (19CC-31): President, J. G. Holtzclaw, Richmond; Vice-Presidents, W. E. Wood, New York; 
Joseph Bowes, T. Norman Jones, Jr., T. Justin Moore, Richmond, R. J, Throckmorton. Norfolk, Va.; 
C. W. Kellogg, New York; Donald C. Barnes, New York; Jos. T. Chase. Itoanoke Rapids, N. C; Secre- . 
tary, W. T. Crawford, New York; Treasurer, G. B. Williams, Richmond, Va. 

CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTRICITY, WHOLESALE— NORTH CAROLINA 

1930-31: Elizabeth City, Hertford, Edenton, Scotland Neck. 

CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTRICITY, RETAIL— NORTH CAROLINA 

1930: Roanoke Rapids, Weldon, Rosemary, Murfreesboro, Winton, Ahoskie, Williamston, Plymouth, 
Columba, etc. t 

1931: Ahoskie, Aulander, Battleboro, Bethel, Columbia, Conetoe, Creswell, Everetts, Garyeburg, 
GntPsvilJe, Halifax, Jackson, Jamesville, Kelford. Lewisfon, Margaretsville, Milwaukee, Murfreesboro, 
Plyirouth, Rich Square, Roanoke Rapids, Roper, Roxobel, Seaboard, Severn, South Mills, Speed, 
Weldon, Whitakers, Williamston, Winfall, Winton, Woodland, W'oodville, 



OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 



All Divisioxs: 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses* 

Electric Division: 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses* _. 

Electric Division — North Carolina 

Operating revenue — 

Operating expenses* 



$ 16,416,360.54 
7,703,669.78 

10,297,985.06 
4,017,522.82 

862,207.45 
417,578.12 



1931 



$ 16,801,144.36 
7,543,786.78 

10,595,068.16 
3,731,329.46 

845,519.39 
416,315.79 



STATISTICS — ELECTRIC— ENTIRE 



1930 



1931 



Plants, capacity: 

Hydro 

Steam i 

Oil - 

Total - 

Current: 
Generated: 

Hydro 

Steam 

Total -- 

Purchased 

Total 

Used by company. 
Unaccounted for. . 

Sold 

Customers, number . 



28,750 


28,050 


132,860 


132,700 


92 


92 


161,702 


160,842 


83,760,260 


97,103,846 


389,162,646 


310,301,519 


472,922,906 


407.405,365 


1 54, 582, 432 


127,223^618 


527,505,338 


534,628,983 


40,016,772 


38,319,335 


84,088,473 


70,071,828 


403,400,093 


426,237.820 


114,473 


116,901 



Virginia Electric and PowEaR Company 

STATISTICS— ELECTRIC— NORTH CAROLINA 



261 



1930 



1931 



Plants, capaci'tt: 

Hydro 

Steam 

Oil.. 

Total-. 

CURRE NT: 

Gene'^ated: 

Hydro 

Steam -^ 

Total.. 

Purchased 

Total 

Used by company 
Unaccounted for . 

.Exported 

Customers 



5,600 


5,600 


3,500 


3,500 


92 


92 


9,192 


9,192 


28,349,060 


29,888,380 


66,800 


4.850 


28,415,860 


29,893,230 


48,175,732 


113,198,318 


76,591,592 


143,091,548 


84,937 


319,382 


6,886,929 


12,082,072 


18,063,211 


76,044,445 


5,441 


5,728 



262 



N. C. CoRPOKATioN Commission 

BALANCE SHEET — 1930 



Assets 



Balance 

December 31, 

1930 



Liabilities 



Balance 
December 31, 



Fixed Capital 

Change 

Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change 

Interest and Dividends Receivable 
Change - 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Prepayments -- 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Assets 

Change 

Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies - 

Change.. 

Miscellaneous Investments 

Change. 

Sinking Funds - 

Change 

Special Deposits 

Change 

Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Change... 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Change 

Adjustment Accounts: 

Reacquired Securities— Bonds 

Change . 

Treasury Securities— Bonds 

Total --. 

Change .-. 



$78,224,112.84 
7,441,324.12 



1,108,674.77 

183,470.85* 

42,718.35 

4,538.54 

1,470,575.36 

182,235.70 

2,129.62 

393.07* 



824,545.02 

89,105.35 

202,864.53 

55,576.38 

7,506.10 

7,506.10 



1,292,654.91 

1,042,079.25* 

12,662.00 

2.00 

6,254,179.86 

515,893.20 

421,465.62 

22,642.46* 



1,083,928.31 
106,358.50 
130,390.36 
98,826.46 



155,000.00 

26,000.00 

351,000.00 



Capital Stock 

Change 

Premium on Capital Stock- 
Change 

Long Term Debt 

Change 



$34,286,974.26 
4,386,114.26 



Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Change 

Accounts Payable 

Change. 

Consumers' Deposit 

Change -.. 

Preferred Stock Subscribed for... 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Liabilities. 
Change 



Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities. 

Change 

Advances from Affiliated Com- 
panies 



26,269.00* 
39,168,075.33 
39,899.35* 



1,800,000.00 

800,000.00 

360,586.23 

4,814.81 

262,288.85 

49,096.40 

47,799.00 

47,799.00 

48,145.03 

10,442.13* 



421,732.27 

86,475.96 

265,664.67 

12,587.89 

6,200.10 

412.22 



Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change _ 

Contributions to Extensions— , 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves— , 

Change 

Miscellaneous Unadjusted Credits 

Change 

Profit and Loss— Surplus 

Change 



18,000.00 



10,037,382.14 

1,344,440.34 

75,383.93 

15,717.81 

116,177.23 

27,834.34* 

149,698.97 

68,889.80* 

4.520,299.64 

439,939.65 



$91,584,407.65 
7,014.063.72 



Total... 
Change. 



$91,584,407.65 
7,014,063.72 



* Deer ease. 



Virginia Electkic; and Power Company 

BALANCE SHEET— 1931 



Assets 



Fixed Capital - 

Change 

Current Assets: 

Cash 

Change 

Notes Receivable 

Change 

Accounts Receivable 

Change 

Interest and Dividends Receivable 
Change 

Inventories and Prepaid Ex- 
penses: 

Material and Supplies 

Change 

Prepayments. 

Change _ 

Subscribed to Capital Stock 

Change 

Miscellaneous Assets: 
Investments in Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Change... 

Miscellaneous Investments 

Change 

Sinking Funds 

Change 

Special Deposits 

Change 

Suspense: 

Unamortized Debt Expense 

Change 

Miscellaneous Suspense 

Change 

Adjustment Accounts: 

Reacquired Securities 

Change 

Treasury Securities 

Total 

Change 



Balance 

December 31, 

J 931 



$79,770,429.39 
1,546,316.55 



909,454.42 

199,220.35^ 

86,567.70 

43,849.35 

1,660,007.89 

189,432.53 

9,583.15 

7,453.53 



735,294.36 
89,250.66* 
74,082.68 
128,781.85* 
1,875.99 
5,630.11* 



982,173.06 

310,481.85* 

48,543.00 

35,881.00 

6,789,848.93 

535,669.07 

416,170.12 

5,295.50* 



981,490.43 
102,437.88* 
256,951.82 
126,561.46 



117,000.00 

38,000.00* 

351,000.00 



193,190,472.94 
1,606,065.29 



Liabilities 



Capital Stock 

Change 

Capital Stock Subscribed 

Change 

Long Term Debt 

Change 

Current Liabilities: 

Notes Payable 

Change 

Accounts Payable 

Change 

Consumers' Deposits 

Change 

Miscellaneous Current Liabilities. 
Change 

Accrued Liabilities: 

Taxes Accrued 

Change 

Interest Accrued 

Change 

Miscellaneous Accrued Liabilities. 

Change 

Advances from Affiliated Com- 
panies 

Reserves: 

Retirement Reserve 

Change 

Contributions to Extensions 

Change 

Miscellaneous Reserves 

Change 

Miscellaneous Unadjusted Credits 

Change 

Profit and Loss— Surplus 

Change. 



Total.... 
Change. 



Balance 

December 31, 

1931 



$34,354,728.76 

67,754.50 

3,222.00 

44,577.00* 

39,155,000.00 

13,075.33* 



3,840,000.00 

2,040,000.00 

318,541.07 

42,045.16* 

258,728.22 

3,560.63* 

41,231.65 

6,913.38* 



476,770.87 
55,038.60 

273,807.32 
8,142.65 
7,394.95 
1,194.85 

18,000.00 



,686,053.66 

351,328.48 

80,866.26 

5,482.33 

62,738.91 

53,438.32 

204,027.47 

54,328.50 

,409,361.80 

110,937.84* 



$93,190,472.94 
1,606,065.29 



'Decrease. 



264 



N. C' Corporation Commission 



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276 



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GENERAL INDEX 

Claims and Complaints — page 

Banks 63 

Bus Companies 64-77 

Claims 60 

Electric Light, Gas and Power Companies 85-112 

Express Companies 117 

Pullman Company 119 

Railroad Companies 1-53 

Telegraph Companies 119 

Telephone Companies 120-130 

Water Company Ill 

CoBPORATioN Commission, Personnel (ii) 

Freight Traffic — Rates — Commodities: (Circulars) 

Bagging, Cotton 136 

Bark, tan 134 

Barrels 134 

Brick 137-140 

Chert 143 

Cinders 143 

Charcoal, Wood 136 

Cotton and Knitting Factory Products 134 

Cotton ties and buckles 136 

Fruit, fresh 152 

Furniture, and furniture parts 135 

General rules governing N. C. intrastate Traffic 136 

Granite 156 

Gravel, washed 143 

Group designation 148 

Ice 157 

Iron or Steel articles 154 

Knitting Factory Products 134 

Limestone, ground 134-144 

Loam Soil 163 

Limestone or marble 144 

Live stock 140 

Marble 156 

Maximum Class Rates 150 

Molasses and Syrup 136 

Paper 137 

Petroleum and Petroleum Products 145 

Road Building Materials 143 

Sand 143 

Slag 143 

Steel articles 154 

Stone, marble, granite 156 



288 North Carolina Corporation Commission 

Stone Screenings 143 

Syrup 136 

Oedebs : 
Banks : 

Raleigh. Raleigh Banking & Trust Company 64 

Windsor. Citizens Bank 63 

Blue Sky: 

Franklin Title and Mortgage Company 64 

Bus Companies: 

List of 77 

Carolina Coach Company 65 

Franchise Certificate Cancellation: 

Dixie Motor Express 66 

Franchise No. 289 67 

Hawkins Motor Express 68 

Hendersonville Bus Company 69 

LaFayette Transit Company 70 

Lenoir-Blowing Rock Line, Inc 72 

Miller Motor Express 73 

Mitchell, J. E., Kinston 73 

Morris Plan Bank of Virginia , 69 

Pierce and Formy Duval 73 

Privette, A. A., Wilson 74 

Smith-Best Transportation Co 75 

Southern Transportation Co 75 

Ward-Perry Motor Express, Inc 76 

Franchise Certificate Denied : 

Barnard, Lee M 65 

Hope Valley Stages, Inc 70 

Franchise Certificate Granted: 

Anderson, Coy H 64 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Receivers 74 

Franchise Transfer: 

East Coast Stages 66 

Golden Belt Bus Line 67 

Safety Transit Co 66 

Electric Light, Gas, Power and Street Railway Companies: 

Carolina Power & Light Company (Depreciation Reserve) 96 

Classification of Accounts - 93 

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity: 

Carolina Mountain Power Corporation 97 

Davidson, Rolland A. (Almond Light & Power Co.) 95 

Ives, Arthur S. (Almond Light & Power Co.) 95 

South East Public Service Company 95 

Southern Public Utilities Company 102 

Tide Water Power Company 105 



General Index 289 

Conference on utility rates and service xvii 

Holding Company Relationship xviii 

Rates : 

Northwest Carolina Utilities 103 

Piedmont Utilities Company 103 

Tide Water Power Company 106 

Virginia Electric and Power Company 110 

Rules regulating operation 85 

Service: 

Carolina Power & Light Company (Discontinuance part of track).... 97 

Southern Public Utilities Company (Consolidation) 105 

Express Companies .' 117 

Pullman Company 119 

Railroads: 

Agency, Discontinued: 

Center Hill (Telegraph service) 17 

Cherryfield 24 

Elmwood 25 

Jackson Springs (Telegraph service) 16 

Kipling (Telegraph service) 16 

Linden (Telegraph service) 16 

Middlesex (Telegraph service) 17 

Penrose 24 

Common Carriers: 

Goldsboro Lumber Company 12 

Ocona Lufty Railroad Company 19 

Rates : 

Application of common carriers to make effective on intrastate 

traffic freight rates and charges 27 

Application of rail carriers for authority to revive intrastate rate 

on petroleum and petroleum products 47 

Atlantic and Marble Tile Company 6 

Earnhardt Manufacturing Company 8 

Cape Pear Railways, Inc 8 

Cotton and Knitting Factory Products 46 

Equitable Freight Adjustment Bureau 11 

Knitting Factory Products 46 

Poe Brick Company 19 

Raleigh Granite Company 20 

Roger Moore's Sons and Company 13 

Seaboard Shale Brick and Tile Company 21 

Turner-White Coffin Company 26 

Wilmington Traffic Association 41 

Service: 

Atlantic & Yadkin (Discontinuance passenger service) 1 

Norfolk Southern Railroad (Discontinuance trains 7 and 10 be- 
tween Goldsboro and Beaufort) 14 

Norfolk Southern Railroad (Discontinuance trains 3 and 4 be- 
tween Raleigh and Norfolk) 17 



290 North Carolina Corporation Commission 

Southern Railway (Discontinuance trains 19 and 20 between Ashe- 

ville and Bryson City) 25 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway (Discontinuance all passen- 
ger service) 45 

Street Railways: 

Asheville Power and Light Company (Depreciation Reserve) 96 

Carolina Power and Light Company (Discontinuance of part of 

track) ; 97 

Telegraph Companies 119 

Telephone Companies: 

Public Convenience and Necessity: • 

Albemarle Telephone Company 127 

South East Public Service Company 128 

Rates: 

Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company: 

Aulander 124 

Columbia 120 

Conway 123 

Fountain :... 121 

Grifton 122 

Lucama 122 

Rich Square : :. 123 

Roanoke Rapids 120 

Roxobel 123 

Weldon 120 

Winton 123 

Woodland 123 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Co.: 

Lincolnton 129 

Service: 

Fremont Telephone Company 125 

Interstate Telephone & Telegraph Co 126 

Water Utility: 

Barber, James, Estate Ill 

Electric Light and Power Companies (large) : 
Reports: 

Caldwell Power Company 209 

Carolina Power and Light Company 213 

Duke Power Company 221 

Durham Public Service Company 227 

East Tennessee Power and Light Company -. 230 

National Utilities Company of North Carolina 237 

North Carolina Public Service Company 239 

Southern Public Utilities Company 248 

Tide Water Power Company - 254 

Virginia Electric and Power Company 260 



GrENERAL InDEX 291 

Electric Light, Gas and Power Companies (small) : 

Reports, listed alphabetically 207 

Statistics (Minor Companies) 264-269 

Express Companies: 
Reports : 

Railway Express Agency 198 

Southeastern Express Co 201 

Gas, Companies Furnishing: 
Reports : 

Asheville Gas Co 207 

Carolina Central Gas Co „ -. 210 

Concord and Kannapolis Gas Co 218 

Durham Gas Co 224 

East Tennessee Power & Light Co 230 

Elizabeth City and Suburban Gas Co 232 

Gastonia and Suburban Gas Co 233 

Henderson and Oxford Gas Co 235 

National Utilities Co. of N. C ,-- 237 

N. C. Public Service Co 239 

Piedmont Utilities Co. 245 

Raleigh Gas Co 246 

Southern Public Utilities Co 248 

Tide Water Power Co 254 

Pullman Company 203 

Railroads : 
Reports: 

Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad Co 174 

Appalachian Railway Co 174 

Asheville and Craggy Mt. Railway Co 166 

Asheville Southern Railway Co 167 

Atlanta and Charlotte Air Line Railway Co 167 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co 161 

Atlantic and Carolina Railroad Co 175 

Atlantic and Danville Railway Co 168 

Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad Co 164 

Atlantic and Western Railroad Co 175 

Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Co 161 

Black Mountain Railway Co 176 

Bonlee and Western Railroad Co 176 

Cape Fear Railways, Inc 177 

Carolina Railroad Co 177 

Carolina and Northeastern Railroad Co 178 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Co 163 

Carolina and Tennessee Southern Railway Co 168 

Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway 162 

Carolina Southern Railroad Co 179 

Cliffside Railroad Co 179 



'292 NoKTH Carolina Corporation Commission 

Clinchfield Railroad Co 162 

^ Danville and Western Railway Co 169 

Dover and Southbound Railroad Co 180 

Durham and South Carolina R. R. Co 164 

Durham and Southern Railway Co 180 

East Carolina Railway 181 

East Tennessee and W. North Carolina Railroad Co 182 

Graham County Railroad Co 182 

High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and Southern Railroad 169 

High Point, Thomasville and Denton Railroad Co 183 

Laurinburg and Southern Railroad Co 183 

Lawndale Railway and Industrial Co 184 

Linville River Railway Co 184 

Louisville and Nashville Railroad Co 185 

Maxton, Alma and Southbound Railroad Co 185 

Moore Central Railway Co 186 

North Carolina Railroad Co 170 

North Carolina Midland Railroad Co 171 

North and South Carolina Railroad Co 170 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Co 163 

Norfolk and Western Railway Co 165 

Piedmont and Northern Railway Co 186 

' Pigeon River Railway Co 187 

Raleigh and Charleston Railroad Co 187-188 

Rockingham Railroad Co 188 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Co 165 

Southern Railway Co 166 

Southern Railway Co. — Carolina Division 171 

State University Railroad Co 172 

Tallulah Palls Railway Co 172 

Tennessee and N. C. Railroad Co 189 

Townsville Railroad Co 189 

Tuckaseegee and Southern Railway Co 190 

Virginia and Carolina Southern Railroad Co 190 

Warrenton Railroad Qo 191 

Washington and Vandemere Railroad Co 191 

Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern Railroad Co 192 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway 173 

Yadkin Railroad Co 173 

Statistics (recapitulation) : 

Capital stock 193-198 

Equipment, cost of 193-198 

Expenses, operating 193-198 

Funded debt 193-198 

Miles road 193-198 

Revenue, operating 193-198 

Revenue, freight 193-198 

Revenue, passenger train service 193-198 



General Indkx 293 

Street Railways, Companies Operating: 

Carolina Power and Light Co 213 

Durham Public Service Co 227 

N. C. Public Service Co > 239 

Southern Public Utilities Co 248 

Tide Water Power Co 254 

Telegraph Companies: 
Report of: 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co. 203 

Western Union Telegraph Co 205 

Telephone Companies: 

Reports, listed alphabetically 270 

Reports, Minor Companies 27S-285 

Statistics: 

Value plant 270-277 

Operating revenue 270-277 

Operating expenses 270-277 

Number phones 270-277 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



3 3091 00748 4991 



HECKMAN 

BINDERY INC. 

^ OCT 92 



N. MANCHESTER, 
INDIANA 46962